May 19, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Biology Courses

  
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    BY 3214 - Microbiology (4) F


    This course is designed to provide a foundation in bacteriology. The first half of the course deals with structure, growth and metabolism of bacteria; the remainder of the course is spent on several aspects of applied microbiology and includes a survey of medically important bacteria.

    Prerequisite: BY 2114  with a minimum grade of “C.”
    Lecture, 3 hours;
    laboratory, 3 hours.
  
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    BY 3223 - Virology (3) SP


    This course serves to acquaint the student with fundamental aspects of viral structure and reproduction, using bacterial and animal viruses as examples. The latter part of the course includes a survey of viruses important in human disease.

    Prerequisite: BY 2114  with a minimum grade of “C.”
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
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    BY 3323 - Immunology (3) F


    This course is designed to acquaint the student with basic aspects of immunology including antigenicity, antibody structure, detection and measurement of antigen-antibody reactions, and hypersensitivity reactions.

    Prerequisite: BY 2114  with a minimum grade of “C” and junior standing or permission of instructor.
    Lecture, 3 hours.
    Recommended: BY 3114  
  
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    BY 3333 - Molecular Basis of Human Disease (3) F


    This course is designed to equip students to critically read and interact with the scientific literature using primary scientific journals that describe major findings in the molecular basis of human diseases. Effectively presenting disease-relevant scientific journal articles is also a focus of this course.

    Prerequisites: BY 2114 , BY 3114  with a minimum grade of “C.”
  
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    BY 3413 - Limnology (3) F Offered in alternate years


    This course instructs the student in the basic aspects of the physical, chemical and biotic factors of inland (fresh) waters. Both lentic and lotic systems are studied. An extensive use is made of local lakes and streams for laboratory investigation. Offered in alternate years

    Lecture, 2 hours;
    laboratory, 3 hours.
  
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    BY 3514 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4) F


    The structure and function of the human body are examined with emphasis upon control mechanisms. The nervous, integumentary, muscular and skeletal systems are studied with lecture and laboratory experiences. There is a regional approach to the anatomy of the extremities, head and neck. Open to biology majors and minors only.

    Prerequisite: BY 1134 .
    Lecture, 3 hours;
    laboratory, 2 hours.
  
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    BY 3524 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4) SP


    This course is a continuation of BY 3514 . The circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, endocrine and reproductive systems are studied with emphasis upon homeostasis. Acid balance, fluid balance and immunity are also integrated into the systematic approach.

    Prerequisite: BY 3514  or permission of the instructor.
    Lecture, 3 hours;
    laboratory, 2 hours.
  
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    BY 3612 - Nature Study (2) F, SP, SU


    An elementary introduction to the study of the natural world. The course is laboratory and field oriented with both living and non-living materials being used to introduce the student to his/her natural surroundings. Emphasis is placed upon the student’s developing the ability to identify such things as insects, birds, reptiles, trees, wild flowers, rocks and minerals. Does not count towards a biology major.

    Lecture, 2 hours;
    laboratory, 2 hours.
  
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    BY 3712 - Conservation of Natural Resources (2) F, SP, SU


    This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the extent of our natural resources and the problems associated with their conservation. Interrelationships between the biotic and abiotic elements of environment; population dynamics and the effects of population changes on biotic and abiotic resources; geological processes; and pollution of natural resources are studied to provide a factual basis on which action can be taken to properly use our resources and improve our environment. Does not count towards biology major.

    Lecture, 2 hours.
  
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    BY 3903 - Internship in Biology (3) F, SP, SU


    The internship provides the opportunity for hands-on experience by working for various agencies, companies, zoos, laboratories or other groups involved in some aspect of biology. Evaluation will be based on supervisor assessment, regular progress reports and a summary report at the end of the semester. Arrangements for the internship should be made during the semester preceding the one in which the student plans to register for the course. No student may be approved for Independent Study, Research or Internship until the Academic Chair has received the appropriate form with the general topic, hours credit and signatures of the student and directing instructor. Forms are available from the academic chair or instructor. No student may be approved for Independent Study, Research or Internship until the Academic Chair has received the appropriate form with the general topic, hours credit and signatures of the student and directing instructor. Forms are available from the academic chair or instructor.

    Prerequisites: Junior standing, completion of at least 19 hours of biology course work, and permission of the academic chair.
  
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    BY 4014 - Molecular Biology (4) SP


    This course focuses on current issues in molecular biology. Topics include DNA structure and replication, transcription, RNA processing, translation, regulation of gene expression and variability in DNA. The laboratory covers basic molecular techniques including electrophoresis of DNA, restriction endonuclease digestion and Southern blotting.

    Prerequisites: BY 2114 , BY 3114 .
    Lecture, 2 hours;
    laboratory, 3 hours.
  
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    BY 4023 - Cancer Biology (3) F Offered in alternate years


    This course is designed to give students in-depth understanding of the molecular basis of cancer, as well as an increased knowledge in clinical aspects of cancer diagnosis and treatment. Characteristics of cancer cells, oncogenes and tumor suppressors, the tumor microenvironment, tumor immunology, and novel cancer therapies are major areas covered. Offered in alternate years

    Prerequisites: BY 2114  and BY 3114 .
  
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    BY 4044 - Ecology (4) F, SP


    An overview of the science of ecology. Three levels are examined: the individual, the population and community, and the ecosystem. Some major concepts covered include abiotic environmental limitations, energy and nutrient flow, population ecology and genetics, and community and ecosystem level interactions. Ecosystems worldwide are discussed, but North American ecosystems are emphasized.

    Prerequisites: BY 1134 , BY 1144 , BY 3114 .
    Lecture, 3 hours;
    laboratory, 3 hours.
  
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    BY 4213 - Developmental Genetics (3) SP Offered in alternate years


    A course which emphasizes developmental stages as well as the mechanisms of developmental processes. The emphasis is on mechanisms rather than organisms in the class work. The laboratory work is concerned with experimental embryology and developmental stages of selected organisms. Offered in alternate years

    Prerequisite: BY 3114 .
    Lecture, 2 hours;
    laboratory, 2 hours.
  
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    BY 4323 - Histology (3) SP


    The study of microscopic anatomy of the human is undertaken with the emphasis upon visual materials. The primary tissues are reviewed in detail, followed by a survey of selected organs.

    Prerequisite: BY 2114  with a minimum grade of “C.”
    Lecture, 2 hours;
    laboratory, 2 hours.
  
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    BY 4413 - Vertebrate Zoology (3) SP Offered in alternate years


    A general survey of vertebrate animals, with special emphasis on comparative anatomy. Laboratory assignments include considerable dissection and often require independent lab work. Offered in alternate years

    Prerequisite: BY 1144  with a minimum grade of “C.”
    Lecture, 2 hours;
    laboratory, 2 hours.
  
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    BY 4802 - Capstone Course (2) F, SP, SU


    In this course the theory of evolution will be investigated in a historical, religious and scientific context. The focus of the discussion-oriented class will be on macroevolutionary theory. Arguments and evidences in various disciplines used to support the theory are presented with discussion of strengths and weaknesses. The course relies heavily on outside readings from classic and current articles, and books by both creationist and evolutionist apologists. World view and its influence on theory formation and acceptance, with emphasis on Christian and naturalistic worldviews, is discussed. Limitations of science and impacts which evolutionary theory has had on other disciplines are also included.

    Prerequisites: senior standing and a minimum grade of “C” in all major core courses.

Special Topics/Independent Research in Biology Courses

  
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    BY 450V - Independent Research (1, 2) F, SP, SU


    The student chooses an area of particular interest, and together with the instructor a research problem is selected. The emphasis may be either field or laboratory oriented. A paper is written and submitted at the end of the course. The course is designed to provide the student an opportunity to pursue independent research and provide experience in scientific writing. No student may be approved for Independent Study, Research or Internship until the Academic Chair has received the appropriate form with the general topic, hours credit and signatures of the student and directing instructor. Forms are available from the academic chair or instructor.

    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and academic chair.
  
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    BY 460V - Special Topics in Biology** (1-4) F, SP, SU


    Selected topics from the field of biology are offered. The course may be either lecture or laboratory-oriented depending upon the topic selected. The study represents an in-depth approach to a specific area of interest to the student. The following are some of the most recently offered special topics: advanced physiology, medical herbalism, arid lands ecology, conservation and biodiversity, and coastal ecology, companion animal biology, and animal nutrition.

    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Chemistry Courses

  
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    CM 1013 - Introduction to Chemistry (3) F, SP, SU


    An introduction to chemistry, intended for nonscience majors, which emphasizes the structure of matter and its chemical consequences. Some topics included are chemical change, toxic substances in the environment, consumer chemistry, applications of organic and basic structures in biochemistry.

    Lecture, 2 hours;
    laboratory, 2 hours.
  
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    CM 1023 - Introduction to Chemistry-Organic (3) SP


    A survey of the types of organic compounds and their reactions-designed to meet the needs of family and consumer science or dietetics majors. Special emphasis is given to consumer chemistry, including such topics as food and textile chemistry.

    Prerequisite: CM 1013 .
    Lecture, 2 hours;
    laboratory, 2 hours.
  
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    CM 1024 - Chemistry for Health Sciences (4) F


    An introduction to chemistry that covers the general structure of matter and types of bonding. Special emphasis is given to the different classes of organic compounds and their reactions. This course is designed to meet the needs of nursing majors. Special emphasis is given to application of organic chemistry to medically related topics.

    Lecture, 3 hours;
    laboratory, 2 hours.
  
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    CM 1034 - Introduction to Chemistry-Biochemistry (4) F


    An elementary level course dealing with the fundamental concepts of biochemistry. Special attention is given to chemical composition of the three major classes of foodstuffs-carbohydrates, lipids and proteins, and the interrelationships of the various metabolic pathways.

    Prerequisite: CM 1023  or CM 1024 .
    Lecture, 3 hours;
    laboratory, 2 hours.
  
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    CM 1113 - General Chemistry I (3) F, SP, SU


    Subjects covered include symbols, formulas, equations, stoichiometry, structure of the atom, chemical bonding, periodic law, thermodynamics, oxidation-reduction, and nuclear chemistry.  This course is designed to meet the needs of chemistry, biology, engineering, premedical, pre-dental, pre-pharmacy, and other science oriented students.

    Prerequisite: Eligibility for enrollment in or credit for MA 1113  or higher.
    Corequisite: CM 1211 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
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    CM 1123 - General Chemistry II (3) F, SP, SU


    Subjects covered include gas laws, liquid and solid states, solutions, colloids, acids, bases, salts, kinetics, equilibrium, solubility product, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and coordination compounds. This course is designed to meet the needs of chemistry, biology, engineering, premedical, pre-dental, pre-pharmacy, and other science students.

    Prerequisite: Eligibility for enrollment in or credit for MA 1113  or higher. Completion of CM 1113  with a grade of “C” or higher.
    Corequisite: CM 1221 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
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    CM 1144 - General Chemistry for Engineering Students (4) F Offered on demand


    This course is designed to meet the needs of engineering students who need one semester of general chemistry with laboratory. Subjects covered in the lecture and laboratory are developed based in part on the topics on the Fundamentals for Engineering Exam. These subjects include atomic structure, periodic table, chemical bonding, oxidation numbers, moles and molecular weight, radioactive decay, gases and ideal gas laws, colligative properties, thermochemistry, equilibrium, concentration and properties of solutions, kinetics, organic chemistry, electrochemistry and fuel cells, modern materials including polymers, and different types of reactions. Applications of these topics are emphasized in the laboratory. This course is not equivalent to CM 1113  or CM 1123  and will not substitute for either.

    Prerequisite: Eligibility for enrollment in or credit for MA 1113 .
    Lecture, 3 hours;
    laboratory, 3 hours.
  
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    CM 1211 - General Chemistry Laboratory I (1) F, SP, SU


    The laboratory experiments introduce students to such topics as:  measurements, structures and properties of atoms and molecules, chemical reactions, and thermodynamics.  This course is designed to complement content presented in general chemistry lecture, CM 1113 .

    Corequisite:  CM 1113 .
    Laboratory, 3 hours.
  
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    CM 1221 - General Chemistry Laboratory II (1) F, SP, SU


    The laboratory experiments introduce students to such topics as:  phases of matter, equilibrium, kinetics, qualitative analysis, and electrochemistry.  This course is designed to complement content presented in general chemistry lecture, CM 1123 .

    Corequisite:  CM 1123 .
    Prerequisites:  CM 1113  and CM 1211 .
    Laboratory, 3 hours.
  
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    CM 2113 - Organic Chemistry I (3) F, SU


    Presents nomenclature, structure-property relationships, bonding theory, stereochemistry, reactions, and reaction mechanisms in such a way to require understanding and application of principles and problem solving as applied to organic chemistry. Emphasizes reactions involving proton transfer, nucleophilic substitution, elimination, and electrophilic addition to nonpolar pi bonds. This course complements the organic laboratory course, CM 2211 .

    Prerequisites: CM 1123  and CM 1221 .  CM 2113 requires completion of CM 1123  with a grade of “C” or higher.
    Corequisite: CM 2211 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
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    CM 2123 - Organic Chemistry II (3) SP, SU


    Emphasizes reactions and mechanisms thereof including conjugated systems, nucleophilic addition reactions to polar pi bonds, nucleophilic addition-elimination reactions, electrophilic aromatic substitution, nucleophilic aromatic substitution, pericyclic reactions, free-radical reactions, and polymerizations as applicable to organic chemistry.  Includes structural elucidation by spectroscopic methods.  This course complements the organic chemistry laboratory course, CM 2221 .

    Prerequisites:  CM 2113  and CM 2211 .  CM 2123 requires completion of CM 2113  with a grade of “C” or higher. ​
    Corequisite: CM 2221 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
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    CM 2211 - Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (1) F, SU


    Introduces basic organic chemistry laboratory skills and techniques. Laboratory work includes separation and purification techniques as well as spectroscopic methods with applications involving qualitative analysis of organic compounds. This laboratory course is designed to complement the organic chemistry lecture course, CM 2113 .

    Prerequisites:  CM 1123  and CM 1221 .
    Corequisite:  CM 2113 .
    Laboratory, 4 hours.
  
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    CM 2221 - Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (1) SP, SU


    Applies and expands basic organic chemistry laboratory skills and techniques used to synthesize and characterize significant classes of organic compounds. Laboratory work includes single and multi-step syntheses with structural confirmation via various spectroscopic methods. This laboratory course is designed to complement the organic chemistry lecture course, CM 2123 .

    Prerequisite:  CM 2113  and CM 2211 .
    Corequisite:  CM 2123 .
    Laboratory, 4 hours.
  
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    CM 2314 - Analytical Chemistry (4) SP


    Theory and practice in elementary gravimetric and volumetric analyses are presented. Laboratory experiences include these areas: precipitation, acid-base, oxidation-reduction and complex ions. Chemical equilibrium and the treatment of analytical data are emphasized.

    Prerequisites: CM 1123  and CS 1041 .
    Lecture, 3 hours;
    laboratory, 4 hours.
  
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    CM 2401 - Clinical Laboratory Observation (1) Offered on demand


    A one-hour course designed for pre-medical and all related majors to introduce them to clinical and/or clinical laboratory work. The student spends approximately 50 hours in observing or performing assigned tasks in a clinic, hospital or clinical laboratory. Specific requirements vary depending on the field of study chosen by the student. A written report is required.

    Prerequisites: CM 1123  and CM 1221 ; CM 2123  and CM 2221  recommended.
  
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    CM 3053 - Methods of Teaching Chemistry (3) F, SP


    To be taken during the professional semester. This is a materials and methods course in the teaching of chemistry.

  
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    CM 3114 - Physical Chemistry I (4, 4) F Offered odd-numbered years


    This sequence of courses provides a general survey of chemical thermodynamics, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, phase equilibria, and the theories of gases, liquids, crystals and solutions.

    Prerequisites: CM 1123 , MA 2324 , PH 2424  and CS 1041 .
    Lecture, 3 hours;
    laboratory, 4 hours.
  
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    CM 3124 - Physical Chemistry II (4, 4) SP Offered odd-numbered years


    This sequence of courses provides a general survey of chemical thermodynamics, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, phase equilibria, and the theories of gases, liquids, crystals and solutions.

    Prerequisites: CM 1123 , MA 2324 , PH 2424  and CS 1041 .
    Lecture, 3 hours;
    laboratory, 4 hours.
  
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    CM 3214 - Environmental Chemistry (4) F Offered odd-numbered years


    A study of the chemistry of the environment, including: chemical cycles, aquatic chemistry, atmospheric chemistry, soil and geochemistry, water pollution, gaseous inorganic and organic air pollutants, hazardous wastes, and environmental chemical analysis. Laboratory experience is field oriented and makes use of HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography), GC-MS (gas chromatography and mass spectrometry), and AA (atomic absorption spectrometry) to examine common environmental pollutants.

    Prerequisites: CM 1023 , CM 1113 , and CM 1123 .
    Lecture, 3 hours;
    laboratory, 3 hours.
    This course may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement.
  
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    CM 3313 - Biochemistry (3) F, SU Offered in the summer on demand


    A study of the chemical composition of living organisms. Chemical and physical properties, molecular structure and biological functions of biomolecules are emphasized. A study of intermediary metabolism is begun.

    Prerequisites: CM 2123  and CM 2221 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
    Recommended: CM 4911 .
  
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    CM 3321 - Biochemistry Lab (1) SP


    The biochemistry laboratory course includes the determination of protein concentration, enzyme kinetics, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing and protein isolation by high speed centrifugation and various chromatographic techniques. Additionally, the manipulation of DNA including the transformation of E.coli with a plasmid containing a foreign gene, expression of that gene, isolation of the plasmid from the bacteria and restriction analysis of the plasmid on agarose gels.

  
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    CM 3333 - Green Chemistry (3) Offered on demand


    The student will understand aspects of analytical, biological, inorganic and polymer chemistry from an environmental or green perspective.  The student will understand and be able to implement the “Twelve Principles of Green Chemistry,” as developed by Anastas and Warner, to aid one assessing the sustainability of a reaction or a process is.

    Prerequisites: CM 2113  and CM 2211  or CM 3214 .
  
  •  

    CM 3341 - Green Chemistry Lab (3) Offered on demand


    A laboratory course in green chemistry required of all applied chemistry majors with the concentration in green chemistry. The lab will emphasize training in the practical implementation of the Twelve Principles of Green Chemistry with a focus on synthesis and analysis, including practical use of less hazardous substitutes, safer design, safer solvents, energy efficiency, reduced derivatization, safe and inexpensive catalysts, degradation design and study, green analytical techniques and practical monitoring. Specific projects may vary as green chemistry is a new and rapidly changing field of study.

    Prerequisites: CM 2221 .
    Corequisites: CM 3333 .
  
  •  

    CM 3414 - Instrumental Methods of Analysis (4) F


    A study of the theory and application of laboratory instrumentation. Methods studied include gas and liquid chromatography; capillary electrophoresis; visible, ultraviolet, infrared, and raman spectrophotometry; atomic emission and absorption spectroscopy; nuclear magnetic resonance; and mass spectroscopy.

    Prerequisites: CM 1123  and CM 2123  or CM 1023 .
    Lecture, 3 hours;
    laboratory, 4 hours.
    Chemistry 3414 may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement.
  
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    CM 3613 - Inorganic Chemistry (3) SP Offered on demand


    A study of the descriptive chemistry of the elements. Theories of atomic and compound structure and bonding, including molecular orbital theory are presented. Special emphasis is given to coordination compounds, including their structure, bonding, reactivity, and spectroscopic properties.

    Prerequisite: CM 1123 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
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    CM 3621 - Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (1) SP Offered on demand


    The inorganic laboratory course includes the synthesis of selected compounds, from main group inorganic compounds to transition metal based coordination compounds and organometallics; characterization of inorganic compounds by IR, UV-Vis, and NMR spectroscopy and MS; study of non-aqueous solvents, magnetochemistry, and ligand exchange; and bioinorganic chemistry, including the modeling of metalloenzymes.

    Corequisite, CM 3613 .
    Laboratory, 3 hours.
  
  •  

    CM 3713 - Introduction to Physical Chemistry (3) F


    A study of the physical properties of matter with an emphasis on problem solving from a predominantly non-calculus basis. Topics covered include properties of gases, liquids and solids, kinetic molecular theory, chemical thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, solutions of non-electrolytes, solutions of electrolytes, electrochemistry, bonding and spectroscopy.

    Prerequisites: CM 1123 , PH 1224 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
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    CM 4213 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3) F Offered on demand


    A detailed study of the theories of atomic structure and chemical bonding emphasizing VB and MO theory. The theoretical aspects of periodic trends, bonding and properties of coordination compounds and organometallic chemistry are presented. The mathematical basis of group theory with application to MO theory and spectroscopy is presented.

    Prerequisite: CM 3124  and CM 3613 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
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    CM 4221 - Advanced Integrated Laboratory (1) SP Offered on demand


    A capstone laboratory course required of professional chemistry majors in their senior year. The lab will have an emphasis on projects involving synthesis of organic and inorganic compounds, analysis and physical property determination of the products and computational chemistry applied to the products. Specific projects depend on the interest of instructor and students.

    Prerequisite: CM 3124 .
    Laboratory, 4 hours.
  
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    CM 4313 - Advanced Analytical Chemistry (3) SP Offered on demand


    A study of the principles of operation of instruments and identification, quantification of unknown compounds using methods such as AA, GC, HPLC, GC/MS, IR and NMR. In-depth interpretation of NMR, IR and mass spectra will be included.

    Prerequisites: CM 2314 , CM 3124 , CM 3414 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
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    CM 4413 - Advanced Organic Chemistry (3) Offered on demand


    A study of basic organic reactions and their mechanisms. Emphases may vary among such topics as bonding theory, molecular structure and properties, structural and electronic effects on reactivity, orbital symmetry rules, and method of determining reaction mechanism.

    Prerequisites: CM 2123 , CM 2221 , CM 3124 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
  •  

    CM 4513 - Advanced Physical Chemistry, Selected Topics (3) Offered on demand


    Selected topics based on current student and faculty interest are established prior to course offering. Suggested topics are thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, statistical thermodynamics, and chemical applications of group theory and graph theory.

    Prerequisite: CM 3124 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
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    CM 4613 - Advanced Biochemistry (3) SP


    A study of the chemical composition of living organisms. The study of intermediary metabolism is continued. Informational biomolecules are emphasized.

    Prerequisites: CM 3313 .
    Corequisite: CM 3321 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
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    CM 4911 - Chemical Literature (1) F


    An introduction to selected chemical literature with an emphasis on methods for retrieving desired information about physical and biological properties or synthetic procedures for specific compounds as well as information on broad concepts or classes or compounds. The use of electronic information retrieval systems such as SciFinder and Science Direct is emphasized.

    Prerequisite: CM 2123 .
    Lecture, 1 hour.
  
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    CM 4921 - Chemical Seminar (1) SP


    A review of the major topics in the undergraduate chemistry curriculum featuring formal class presentations by departmental faculty and culminating in the major field exam followed by an independent library research project on a topic of the student’s choice. A paper and oral presentation, featuring presentation software, will be made by each student to the class.

    Prerequisite: CM 4911  and senior standing in Chemistry.
    Lecture, 1 hour.

Special Topics/Independent Research in Chemistry Courses

  
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    CM 0xn0 - Chemistry Laboratory Safety 0 F, SP, SU


    This is a series of non-credit courses that will provide formalized safety training for students regarding hazards they may encounter in chemistry laboratories. There are recognized ways to work with chemicals that can reduce the probability of accidents, including toxic exposure, to a negligible level. Students will receive training regarding awareness and anticipation of the hazards present and how to take appropriate precautions, including the use of personal protective equipment.

  
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    CM 411V - Independent Study and Research (1, 2) F, SP, SU


    The student works closely with his/her research director in all aspects of a chemical research problem. The student is expected to make original contributions and present a paper to the chemistry faculty based on his/her findings. Acceptance of a paper by the research director is required.


Chinese Courses

  
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    CHIN 1114 - Elementary Chinese I (4, 4) 1114-F Offered on demand


    An introduction to the Chinese language including pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, reading, writing, conversation and cultures of the Chinese-speaking world. Three hours of classwork per week supplemented by a corequisite weekly interactive culture lab session directed by the course instructor. Chinese 1114 and CHIN 1124  must be taken in conjunction with the required interactive culture lab which is an integral part of the learning and grading of the course.

    Note: Only one year of Chinese is offered; this is offered only upon sufficient demand and is also dependent on scheduling availability.
    Prerequisite to CHIN 1124 : Chinese 1114 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or higher.
    Lab fee: $20.
  
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    CHIN 1124 - Elementary Chinese II (4, 4) 1124-SP Offered on demand


    An introduction to the Chinese language including pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, reading, writing, conversation and cultures of the Chinese-speaking world. Three hours of classwork per week supplemented by a corequisite weekly interactive culture lab session directed by the course instructor. CHIN 1114  and 1124 must be taken in conjunction with the required interactive culture lab which is an integral part of the learning and grading of the course.

    Note: Only one year of Chinese is offered; this is offered only upon sufficient demand and is also dependent on scheduling availability.
    Prerequisite to Chinese 1124: CHIN 1114  or equivalent with a grade of “C” or higher.
    Lab fee: $20.

Civil and Environmental Engineering Courses

  
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    CEE 1123 - Fundamentals of Engineering Design (3) SP


    Fundamentals of engineering design as it pertains to civil engineering. An introduction into computer applications for engineering designs using Microsoft Excel and engineering graphics using AutoCAD.

    Prerequisite: ENGR 1113 .
    Lecture, 2 hours;
    laboratory 3 hours.
  
  •  

    CEE 2113 - Statics (3) F, SP


    Studies in the principles of statics, force systems and equilibrium analysis of structures, friction, centroids and center of gravity, and moments of inertia.

    Prerequisite: PH 2414   with minimum grade of C.
    Corequisite: MA 2314 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
  •  

    CEE 2123 - Dynamics (3) SP


    Studies in the principles of dynamics, rectilinear translation, curvilinear translation, rotation, plane motion, work and energy, and impulse and momentum.

    Prerequisites: CEE 2113 , MA 2314 , both with a minimum grade of C.
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
  •  

    CEE 2133 - Surveying and Geomatics (3) F


    Surveying theory and practice including horizontal, vertical and angular field measurements, analysis of measurements, errors and error analysis, and graphical or digital presentation of survey data. Introduction to GIS and GPS.

    Prerequisite: ENGR 1113 .
    Lecture, 1 hour;
    Laboratory, 6 hours.
  
  •  

    CEE 3113 - Strength of Materials (3) SP


    Studies in the principles of stress, strain, torque, bending moment, Hooke’s law, torsion, shear and bending moment diagrams, beam theory, columns and shafts.

    Prerequisites: CEE 2113 , MA 2314 , both with a minimum grade of “C.”
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
  •  

    CEE 3211 - Solid Mechanics and Materials Laboratory (1) F


    A series of experiments which demonstrate the theory of mechanics of materials and the most important characteristics of engineering materials.

    Prerequisites: CEE 3113   with a minimum grade of “C.”
    Laboratory, 3 hours.
  
  •  

    CEE 3213 - Structural Analysis (3) F


    Analysis of statically determinate and indeterminate trusses, beams and frames. Stability and determinacy: shear, moment and axial force diagrams for beams and frames. Deflection calculations using double integration, moment-area theorems and virtual work. Force and displacement methods for analysis of indeterminate structures. Approximate analysis of monolithic building frames. Computer applications for structural analysis.

    Prerequisites: Civil and Environmental Engineering 3113 with a minimum grade of “C.” 
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
  •  

    CEE 3313 - Environmental Engineering (3) F


    Fundamentals of environmental engineering. Applications in water quality, water and wastewater treatment, solid waste management, air pollution and hazardous waste management. Environmental regulations.

    Prerequisites: CM 1123  with a minimum grade of “C,” and CM 1221 .
    Corequisite: CEE 3613 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
  •  

    CEE 3413 - Construction (3) F


    Fundamental concepts of construction, equipment selection, productivity, concrete and steel construction, construction contracts, economics, estimating and scheduling.

    Prerequisites: CEE 2133 .
    Corequisite:  ENGR 3943  
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
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    CEE 3443 - Civil Engineering Materials (3) SP


    The physical and mechanical properties of materials used in construction including aggregates, cements, concretes, masonry, ferrous and non-ferrous metals, and wood; the behavior of materials under load; and material testing standards.

    Prerequisites: CM 1113  and CM 1211 CEE 3113  with a minimum grade of “C.”
    Corequisite: CEE 3211 .
    Lecture, 2 hours;
    Laboratory, 3 hours.
  
  •  

    CEE 3451 - CE Construction Materials Lab (1) F


    A series of experiments which demonstrate fundamental principles of civil engineering materials including aggregates, cements, concretes, masonry, ferous and non-ferous metals, and wood.  Material testing standards are used in the experiments.  

    Corequisite: CEE 3443
    Laboratory 3 hours
  
  •  

    CEE 3513 - Transportation Engineering I (3) F


    Planning, operation and design of transportation systems with an emphasis on highway transportation. Contemporary issues in transportation policy, transportation planning models, and project evaluation and selection techniques. Fundamental principles of traffic flow theory, shockwaves, delay at intersections, queuing systems traffic control and use of the Highway Capacity Manual. Design of horizontal and vertical alignment. Introduction to transportation engineering with emphasis on highway systems, highway design and traffic flow. Applications of engineering economic analysis.

    Prerequisites: CEE 2133 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
  •  

    CEE 3613 - Fluid Mechanics (3) F


    Fundamentals of fluid flow; fluid statics, systems and control volumes; continuity, momentum and energy equations; dynamic similitude; flow in pipes and open channels; flow measurements.

    Prerequisites: MA 2324 , CEE 2123  both with a minimum grade of “C.”
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
  •  

    CEE 3621 - Hydraulics Laboratory (1) SP


    A series of experiments which demonstrate the theory of fluid mechanics in civil and environmental engineering applications. Particular emphasis is placed on pumps, pipe flow and open channel flow.

    Prerequisites: CEE 3613 .
    Laboratory, 3 hours.
  
  •  

    CEE 3713 - Geotechnical Engineering (3) SP


    Physical properties of soils, soil mechanics including phase relationship, soil classification, permeability, effective stress, time-settlement analysis, compaction, sheer strength and bearing capacity.

    Prerequisites: CEE 3113  and CEE 3613   both with a minimum grade of “C.”
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
  •  

    CEE 3721 - Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory (1) SP


    A series of experiments which demonstrate fundamental principles of geotechnical materials used in civil engineering.

    Corequisites: CEE 3443 , CEE 3713 .
    Laboratory, 3 hours.
  
  •  

    CEE 4213 - Reinforced Concrete Structural Design (3) F


    Concrete and reinforcing steel properties; analysis and design of reinforced concrete beams, slabs, columns and footings.

    Prerequisites: CEE 3213  with a minimum grade of “C,” and CEE 3443 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
  •  

    CEE 4223 - Structural Steel Design (3) SP


    Analysis and design of structural steel members and their connections according to the ASIC Manual of Steel Construction. Tension members, compression members, beams and beam columns. Bolted connections in tension, shear and bearing. Analysis of simple welded connections.

    Prerequisite: CEE 3213   with a minimum grade of “C.”
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
  •  

    CEE 4313 - Water and Wastewater (3) SP


    Potable water treatment and wastewater treatment and disposal. Treatment systems; operation/process physics, chemistry and biology; operation and maintenance issues; and regulatory requirements.

    Prerequisites: CEE 3313 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
  •  

    CEE 4413 - Construction Project Planning and Management (3)


    Planning and management of construction/engineering projects and organizations, project management techniques, skills and applications. Contracts, laws, financing and safety.

    Prerequisites: CEE 3413 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
  •  

    CEE 4513 - Transportation Engineering II (3)


    Integrating transportation engineering principles into the design of multimodal transportation systems, including an overview of transportation design tools often utilized in the industry. Analysis of geometric design and operations management strategies to improve safety and performance; including design for non-motorized and public transport, intelligent transportation systems, signal systems and simulation.

    Prerequisites: CEE 3513 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
  •  

    CEE 4613 - Urban Hydrology and Hydraulic Systems (3) F


    Hydrologic cycle, precipitation, infiltration, runoff with emphasis on small urban watersheds. Analysis and design of typical urban hydraulic systems/components, including curbs, inlet gutters, storm sewers, detention/retention ponds, sanitary sewer systems, pump stations, potable water transmission and distribution systems.

    Prerequisites: CEE 3613 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
  •  

    CEE 4713 - Foundation Engineering (3) F


    Application of soil mechanics and soil behavior in geotechnical engineering analysis and design. Slope stability, subsurface exploration, lateral earth pressure, retaining structure design, foundation bearing capacity and settlement. Principles of foundation design.

    Prerequisite: CEE 3713 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.

Special Topics/Independent Research in Civil and Environmental Engineering Courses

  
  •  

    CEE 491V - Special Topics in Civil Engineering (1-5)


    Selected topics from civil and environmental engineering will be offered as opportunities develop. Course format may be lecture, lab or project depending on the specific topic selected.

    Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

Communication Courses

  
  •  

    CO 1003 - Introduction to Communication (3) F, SP


    A course in the fundamental principles of effective oral communication. Special attention is given to the selection and organization of materials and the presentation of speeches. Three emphases of the course are: theory, practice and constructive criticism.

  
  •  

    CO 1014 - 21st Century Media (4) F, SP


    Foundation course exploring digital citizenship, media convergence and ethics. Lab required.

  
  •  

    CO 2013 - Principles of Advertising (3)


    This course deals with the role of advertising in society. It covers the past, present, and future of advertising in America. Topics covered will involve advertising management, production, planning, different media venues and advantages and disadvantages of each.

  
  •  

    CO 2133 - Persuasion and Advocacy (3) F, SP


    Study and application of seminal and current theories of persuasion for attitudinal and behavior change through advocacy communication.

  
  •  

    CO 2144 - Multimedia Storytelling (4) F, SP


    Focus on creative, character-driven writing to tell stories for all media, including the use of images, recorded video and sound. Students develop narratives for print, television, radio, podcasts or for the Web in multimedia form. Lab required.

    Prerequisite or Corequisite:  CO 1014 
  
  •  

    CO 2153 - Broadcast and New Media (3) F


    Emphasis placed on reporting, writing and producing for broadcast and new media, including fundamentals of reporting, writing and producing basic, multiple element and feature stories. Assignments will include reporting and producing for Lipscomb student media.

    Prerequisite: CO 1014 .
    This course may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement.
  
  •  

    CO 2213 - Event Planning (3) SP


    Course designed to allow students to apply administrative theories to the multidisciplinary nature of public relations and communication through event design and development, logistics, coordination, operations, budgeting, promotion and evaluation.

    Prerequisite: CO 1003  
  
  •  

    CO 2223 - Image, Motion, and Sound (3) F


    Students will learn how to convey stories, messages and ideas through the use of motion and sound. This course explores theories and the latest techniques in photography, basic motion animation, typography, design, infographics and audio production.

    Prerequisite or Corequisite IT 1213  
  
  •  

    CO 2703 - Organizational Communication (3) F


    A broad study of the flow of messages in organizations, including individual communication in presentations and interviewing, group problem-solving, negotiation and strategies for communication of leadership vision to achieve stakeholder buy-in.

    This course may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement.
  
  •  

    CO 3013 - Cross-Cultural Communication (3) F, SP


    This course is designed to offer a theoretical basis for the concept of cross-cultural communication, followed by in-class practice, community experience and reflection.

    Credit for this course may be satisfied by taking GL 110V, The Cross-Cultural Experience.
  
  •  

    CO 3083 - Negotiation (3) F


    This course will develop an understanding of the principles, strategies, and tactics of effective negotiation and professional relationship management, particularly in the fields of communication and public diplomacy.

  
  •  

    CO 3103 - Advertising Copy and Layout (3)


    This course will introduce students to the communication knowledge, skills and abilities for ad copywriting, ad design, ad layout and advertising production. Through lecture, classroom discussion, hands-on learning, creation and critique of deliverables and other learning activities students can gain an understanding of the fundamental principles of advertising copywriting and ad layout.

  
  •  

    CO 3113 - Web and Mobile Journalism (3) SP


    Students will learn how to communicate information effectively through basic web coding, interface design and visualization. Students will survey the latest techniques used in web design and coding with special focus on user experience, comprehension and design process.

    Prerequisite: CO 1014  
  
  •  

    CO 3413 - Media History (3) SP Odd Years


    Survey of the development of journalism and mass media including historiography and examinations of movements.

  
  •  

    CO 3553 - Communication Law and Ethics (3) F, SP


    The First Amendment is the philosophical foundation for freedom of speech and press in America. This course distinguishes between forms of communication that have constitutional protection and those with limitations (libel, privacy, copyright, censorship, commercial speech, broadcast licensing, access to information). Students explore the foundations of moral reasoning and apply ethical responsibilities to communications cases in journalism and new media, strategic communication, event planning and sports media.

  
  •  

    CO 3573 - Crisis Communication (3) F, SP


    A practical exploration of a growing and important field of communication. Students will learn foundational strategies of crisis communication from the perspectives of public relations and journalism. Lecture, guest speakers, case studies and crisis exercises highlight the course of study for crisis communication and its corresponding field, reputation management.

  
  •  

    CO 3593 - Innovation in Media (3) F


    This course focuses on the role of innovation for the future of journalism and on the creation of news and information enterprises and initiatives for the emerging media.

    Prerequisites: CO 2013  and CO 3962  
  
  •  

    CO 3603 - On-Camera Delivery (3) F


    Offers students the opportunity to develop and practice verbal and nonverbal delivery on-camera and effective communication of messages through broadcast media. Covers reporting, hosting and interviewing for journalism/ new media majors, interview and news conference preparation and execution for other majors.

    Prerequisite: CO 1003 , with a minimum grade of “C.”
 

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