May 19, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Special Topics/Independent Research/Variable Credit in Film and Creative Media Courses

  
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    FICM 3xnV - Special Topics (3)


    Topics include producing in the digital age and acting for film.

  
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    FICM 4nnV - Special Topics (1-6)


    Various topics in dramatic literature and performance. (Examples: advanced scene design, advanced playwriting, etc.)  

    Requires consent of the instructor. 
  
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    FICM 412V - Career Creativity (3)


  
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    FICM 491V - Internship Variable F, SP


  
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    FICM 499V - Independent Study (1-3)


    This course gives students the opportunity to work independently on a creative media project or research project in the area of film, television or creative media with the oversight of a full-time faculty member. Students present a proposal of the project and work with the faculty member on deadlines and delivery content for the semester. All independent study proposals must also be approved by the department chair.


Finance Courses

  
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    FI 2303 - Financial Markets & Institutions (3) SP


    A survey of the various financial markets and the financial instruments that trade in them. Markets studied include the stock, bond, currency, derivative and commodity markets. Attention is focused on the risk and return characteristics of traded securities and on the role of financial markets on the larger world economy.

    Prerequisite: EC 2403   The course is designed primarily for sophomores as they begin a major in Finance, and is not a part of the business core.
  
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    FI 2503 - Business Analysis, Techniques and Tools (3) F, SP, SU


    In this course, students will explore the sourcing and use of data in a business context.  Students will learn to collect, prepare, and analyze data, and will gain an appreciation for the challenges associated with manipulating and putting context around data. This course will include detailed instruction on the use of spreadsheet software and will finish with a basic introduction to visualization of data. Practical examples will use analytical spreadsheet tools to enhance business decision-making.

    Prerequisites: MA 2183  , MG2013 or MG3013.
  
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    FI 3012 - Corporate Finance (2) F


    This course will develop analytical skills for making corporate investment with respect to financial decisions and risk analysis. To that end, students will examine various theories including the concepts of present value, the opportunity cost of capital, discounted cash flow analysis, valuation techniques, risk and return, capital asset pricing model, capital budgeting, corporate capital structure and financing decisions, dividend policy, investment and financial decisions in the international context, including exchange rate/interest rate risk analysis, and issues of corporate governance and control.

     

    Prerequisite: FI3503 Principles of Finance

  
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    FI 3503 - Principles of Finance (3) F, SP, SU


    A study of the concepts and computations relating to financial analysis, time value of money, risk and return, and capital budgeting. 

    Prerequisites:  Sophomore standing and AC 2503  
  
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    FI 3603 - International Economics and Finance (3) F


    This course will focus on international trade as a sub-theme in the greater concert of the human struggle to survive and prosper that has continued, in essence, unchanged throughout the centuries. The emphasis will be on developing a framework for evaluating trade on a global scale.

    Prerequisites: FI 3503  
  
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    FI 3643 - Financial Planning (3) SP


    A study that covers the broad range of financial services topics, including the financial planning process, the time value of money, insurance and risk management, investment tax planning, retirement planning and estate planning.

  
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    FI 3703 - Equity Investments (3) SP


    Covers institutional facts about equity markets, modern portfolio theory and market efficiency, fundamental and technical analysis.

    Prerequisites FI 3503  with a grade of “B” or above.
  
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    FI 3803 - U.S. Business, Culture and Travel to [insert destination] (3)


    The course gives learners the opportunity to travel to major business center(s) in the United States, gaining exposure to a business environment not present in Middle Tennessee. Attention will be given to various business segments, trends, governing/advising bodies, cultural influences, political issues, marketing and service strategies, management approaches, financial institutions, money and capital centers, and other factors impacting the transaction of business in the chosen destination. Domestic trip participation is required.

  
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    FI 4032 - Investment Banking (2) F


    This course examines the primary functions of investment banking, such as mergers and acquisitions, leveraged buyouts and corporate restructuring.

    Prerequisite: FI 3012 Corporate Finance
  
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    FI 4042 - Insurance Planning (2) F


    This course analyzes the key components of life, accident and health insurance policies as well as property and casualty insurance in the context of personal financial planning.

    Prerequisites: FI3643 Financial Planning
  
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    FI 4052 - Retirement Planning (2) F


    Provide students with an understanding of both public and private retirement plans. The public plans include Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. The private plans include defined benefit and defined contribution plans and their regulatory provisions. The specifics of the various plans will be analyzed as well as non-qualified compensation plans.

    FI 3643 Financial Planning
  
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    FI 4062 - Financial Modeling (2) S


    This course utilizes spreadsheets and other software products to analyze the impacts of financial decisions related to financial statement analysis, cash budgeting, and cost of capital determination, capital budgeting, and capital structure choices. The course covers a variety of techniques, such as sensitivity and scenario analysis, optimization methods, Monte Carlo simulations and regression analysis.

    Prerequisites: FI 2503 Business Analytics and FI 3503 Principles of Finance
  
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    FI 4072 - Tax Planning for High Net Worth Individuals (2) S


    This course focuses on the practical aspects of taxing wealthy individuals. To that end, students will review general income-tax planning for wealthy individuals, passive investments, the use and limitations of qualified plans, investment planning, life, disability, and liability insurance exposures, retirement planning, and estate planning.

    Prerequisites: FI 3643 Financial Planning and AC 3573 Federal Income Taxation
  
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    FI 4343 - Fundamentals of Real Estate (3)


    An introduction to the basics of real estate: markets, law, appraisal, finance and management.

    Prerequisites: FI 3503  with a grade of “C” or above.
  
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    FI 4803 - Global Business, Culture and Travel to [insert destination] (3)


    This course gives learners international business exposure and a unique cultural experience with an opportunity to encounter first-hand a global business environment including various business segments, trends, governing/advising bodies, cultural influences, political issues, marketing and service strategies, management approaches, financial institutions, money and capital centers, and other factors impacting the transaction of business in the chosen destination. International trip participation is required.

  
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    FI 4813 - Investment Fund Management (3) F, SP, SU


    Students enrolled in this course are responsible for managing a real portfolio of Tennessee Valley Authority funds. Students also compete in the TVA Investment Challenge against investment teams from other universities in the TVA region. Participating students are responsible for security selection, portfolio balancing and other fund management decisions.

    Corequisite: FI 3703 .
    Completion of FI 3703  before taking this course is strongly recommended.
  
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    FI 4913 - Special Topics (3) SP


    This course covers material that does not fit neatly into the other courses in the finance major, either for conceptual reasons or time constraints. The course will be composed of several distinct content modules. A partial list of possible topics includes: mergers and acquisitions, private equity, hedge funds, financial forecasting, financial modeling, bankruptcy and financial distress, and the valuation of private companies.

    Prerequisites: Senior standing in one of the finance majors.

Special Topics/Independent Research in Finance Courses

  
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    FI 390V - Internship in Finance (1-10) F, SP, SU


    Prerequisite: Permission of professor in charge and department chair and junior or senior standing.
  
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    FI 401V - Independent Study in Finance (1-3) F, SP, SU


    Independent research of primary and secondary data in a selected topic; topic title to be approved by major professor and department chair; paper to be kept on file.

    Prerequisites: advanced standing, proven research ability and approval of academic chair.
    Course may be repeated.

Foreign Language Courses

  
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    FL 4514 - Introduction to Teaching Foreign and Second Languages: Theory and Practice (4) F, SU


    Study of theory, methods, and materials for teaching foreign and second languages at all levels. Course is designed for modern language teaching majors (French, German, Spanish), counting towards the major in those areas, and for education majors. For education majors, this course should be taken prior to student teaching. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor (usually involves a background of three years of university-level modern language or its equivalent, or an education major).

    Prerequisite: permission of the instructor (usually involves a background of three years of university-level foreign language or its equivalent).
  
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    ML 2103 - How Languages Work (3) F or SP


    This course introduces key concepts and research findings that explain how people learn and use languages. Students will learn to use linguistic terminology and think critically about language change through history. Topics will include relationships among modern European languages in comparison to world language systems; theories and research on how children and adults learn first and other languages; analysis of sounds/sound patterns; and socio-political implications of language use. Taught in English.


French Courses

  
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    FR 1114 - Elementary French I (4) F; Summer on demand


    An introduction to French language and culture, providing opportunities for literacy development in French through a range of creative activities to develop receptive skills through listening and comprehension activities, and then speaking and writing skills as proficiency in the language grows. Students completing French I will be able to complete basic functions in the target language (counting, describing people, talking about hobbies and activities, asking questions, etc.) and will have an elementary understanding of grammar, present and past tense construction, and syntax. This course is designed for students who have never studied French; those with previous high school study should take the language placement test before enrolling. Lab fees in French I are used to provide opportunities to build community through experiential learning, such as sampling authentic French foods, viewing films, etc.

    No previous study of French in high school or college, or appropriate score on foreign language placement exam.
    Lab fee: $20.
  
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    FR 1124 - Elementary French II (4) SP; summer on demand


    The second course in the elementary French sequence. Students continue building literacy in French by reading, listening, speaking, and writing about important daily functions (describing homes, talking about food and cultural practices, daily routines, expressing opinions, and narrating events in past and future tenses). Additionally, students will compare cultural practices in Francophone regions and the U.S. and develop an understanding of how culture shapes them as individuals. Students who place into this course via the placement test and who earn an A or B may choose to receive credit for Elementary French I (fee required). Lab fees in French II provide opportunities for experiential learning, including partnering with native speakers abroad.

    Prerequisite to French 1124: FR 1114  or equivalent with a grade of “C” or higher, or appropriate score on foreign language placement exam.
    Lab fee: $20.
  
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    FR 2114 - Intermediate French I (4) F


    Building on a basic foundation in French, acquired either in the elementary sequence or in previous language study, this course helps students develop their skills and use them more freely in listening, reading, writing, and speaking. Practice with meaningful language will include writing essays, listening to native speaker samples, and creating language spontaneously, both orally and in writing. Activities will explore French culture, with lab fees used to provide opportunities such as sampling authentic food.

    Prerequisite to FR 2124 : French 2114 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or higher.
    Lab fee: $20.
  
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    FR 2124 - Intermediate French II (4) SP


    This course, a continuation of Intermediate French I, allows students to acquire greater ease and fluency in discussing basic ideas, sharing their interests, and navigating everyday scenarios. Goals will include learning to share critical thinking, negotiating meaning of abstract concepts, and exploring multiple aspects of French culture. A focus on written and oral narrating in a variety of tenses and moods (e.g., conditionnel, plus-que-parfait, futur antérieur, subjonctif) will provide practice in listening, reading, writing, and speaking in a range of communicative contexts.

    Prerequisite to French 2124: FR 2114  or equivalent with a grade of “C” or higher.
    FR 2114  or appropriate score on foreign language placement exam.
    Lab fee: $20.
  
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    FR 2313 - French Conversation (3)


    This course helps develop the skills necessary for comprehension, communication, and discussion in French. Students will explore aspects of French and Francophone daily life as based on a variety of texts, both written (textbook chapters, dialogues, poetry, magazine and newspaper articles) and oral (podcasts, films, television programs).  The primary goal of the course is to develop spontaneous conversational fluency and awareness of specific discourse strategies (taking the floor, offering advice, expressing surprise, etc.), with accuracy in grammar and pronunciation as foundational components.

    FR 1124  or permission of instructor.

  
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    FR 3113 - Advanced Grammar and Composition (3) F


    This course provides opportunities for students to build grammar and speaking skills through discussions of authentic materials, films, articles, and stories in partner, group, and class activities. Students will work with advanced / difficult grammatical structures and topics.

    Prerequisite: FR 2114  and FR 2124 .
    Lab Fee: $20.
  
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    FR 3123 - Advanced Pronunciation and Performance (3) F or SP


    This course helps students perfect how they sound when speaking French. With an introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet and to the articulation of sounds in French, students will learn to transcribe French into the IPA and will practice individual sounds as well as rhythm and intonation patterns. The course provides opportunities to memorize and present poems or other works before an audience (class or otherwise) with increasing comfort and fluency.  

     

    Prerequisite: FR 2114  and FR 2124 .
    FR 2124  
    May be repeated for credit with prior approval.
    Lab Fee: $20.

  
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    FR 3163 - French Civilization and Culture (3) F or SP


    An introduction to French civilization from its early origins to its modern political and social systems. Students in this course will analyze how this trajectory has shaped French culture through the interplay, tensions, and conflicts among literature, art, religion, philosophy, music, and historical forces. Students will work with authentic texts, historical primary sources, and current French media to explore central figures, movements, and moments in French cultural history.

     

    FR 2124  

  
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    FR 4113 - Survey of French Literature I: From the Middle Ages to the Revolution (3) F or SP


    This course is an introduction to central works in medieval and early modern French literature. Through close study of plays, poems, chronicles, and novels, students will explore French stylistics, literary movements, and literature’s relationship to a larger intellectual and social framework, and will develop language skills for literary analysis through class discussion, writing, and presentations. Authors / works studied may include the images at Lascaux, Christine de Pisan, Rabelais, Montaigne, Corneille, Descartes, and Voltaire.

    Prerequisite: FR 2124  
    Satisfies the general education humanities literature requirement.
  
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    FR 4123 - Survey of French Literature II: From the 19th to the 21st Century (3) F or SP


    This course is an introduction to central works in modern French literature. By reading and discussing plays, poems, journalism, and novels, students will explore French stylistics, literary movements, and literature’s relationship to a larger intellectual and social framework, and develop language skills for literary analysis through class discussion, writing, and presentations. Authors studied may include Flaubert, Zola, Baudelaire, Proust, Sartre. This course does not require completion of Survey of French Literature I.

    Prerequisite: FR 2124 .
    Satisfies the general education humanities literature requirement.
  
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    FR 4153 - Francophone Literature and Culture (3) SP


    This course provides opportunities for students to reflect on the intersections of language, literature, and culture in the French-speaking world. Students will develop critical thinking skills through contrasting knowledge of their native culture(s) with ways in which other cultures express their values and beliefs. Students will consider relationships of language and identity, and language and power as they study writers from various parts of the francophone world (e.g., Senegal, Haiti, Vietnam, Québec, etc.), such as Maryse Condé, Ousmane Sembène, Gabrielle Roy, Mariama Bâ, J-B Tati-Loutard, et al. This course will develop literacy in French by connecting reading and writing with discussion and critical reflection on culture. Ample opportunities for dialog and active student participation will available through regular group discussions.

    FR 2124  

Game Development Courses

  
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    GD 1123 - Introduction to Game Design and Development (3) F


    Fundamentals of game design, games as an artistic and expressive medium, game theory, modern gaming technologies, game critique and evaluation, game development engines, emergent gameplay, the business of creating games, collaborative development, and gaming with a purpose.

  
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    GD 3253 - Game Development I (3) SP


    Introduction to the design and implementation of computer games, including real-time graphics, audio and interactive multimedia programming techniques.

    Prerequisite: CS 2233   with a grade of “C” or higher.
  
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    GD 3263 - Game Development II (3) F


    Advanced game programming techniques, including 3D graphics, 3D audio, game physics and networking for multi-player games.

    GD 3253   with a grade of “C” or higher.
  
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    GD 3273 - Collaborative Serious Games Development (3) SP


    Advanced team-based game development on applications of interactive technology for video game domains such as education, health, training, analytics, visualization, simulation and therapy.

    Prerequisite: GD 3263   with a grade of “C” or higher.

General Education Courses

  
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    LUEG 3083 - Engagements: Faith, Ethics, & Healthcare (3) F, SP


  
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    LUHP 2003 - Great Ideas in Philosophy (3) F, SP


    An interdisciplinary introduction to some of the most significant ideas and traditions that have influenced global and Western civilizations, with special emphasis on philosophical questions and issues.

  
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    LUHP 2023 - Great Ideas in Politics (3) F, SP


    An interdisciplinary introduction to some of the most significant ideas and traditions that have influenced global and Western civilizations, with special emphasis on political questions and issues.

  
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    LUHP 2033 - Great Ideas in History (3) F, SP, SU


    An interdisciplinary introduction to some of the most significant ideas and traditions that have influenced global and Western civilizations, with special emphasis on historical questions and issues.

  
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    LUMS 2xn3 - Explorations in Math/Science: (selected topic) (3) F, SP


    Topics for this course partner content in mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, astronomy, environmental sciece & sustainability with each other or with content in another academca area in order to explore the connections between the two areas.  Content will be integrated to develop the students’ skills and content knowledge in the participating academic areas as well as to provide opportunities for students to understand the relationship between the specific content and between the academic areas in general. Laboratory experiences vary depending on topic.  

    Prerequisite: Foundations course work in math and science. (Prerequisites do not apply to LUMS 2003).
  
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    LUMS 2003 - Explorations in Math/Science: Power of Science I/Biology and Chemistry (3) F, SP


    Topics for this course partner content in mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, astronomy, environmental science & sustainability with each other or with content in another academic area in order to explore the connections between the two areas. Content will be integrated to develop the students’ skills and content knowledge in the participating academic areas as well as to provide opportunities for students to understand the relationship between the specific content and between the academic areas in general. Laboratory experiences vary depending on topic.

    Prerequisite: Foundations course work in math and science.
    Lecture 2 hours
    Lab 2 hours
  
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    LUMS 2013 - Explorations in Math/Science: Power of Science II/Physics and Nutrition (3) F, SP


    Topics for this course partner content in mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, astronomy, environmental science & sustainability with each other or with content in another academic area in order to explore the connections between the two areas. Content will be integrated to develop the students’ skills and content knowledge in the participating academic areas as well as to provide opportunities for students to understand the relationship between the specific content and between the academic areas in general. Laboratory experiences vary depending on topic.

    Prerequisite: Foundations course work in math and science.
    Lecture 3 hours
  
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    LUMS 2083 - Explorations in Math/Science: Power of Science III/Physics and Meteorology (3) F, SP


    Topics for this course partner content in mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, astronomy, environmental science & sustainability with each other or with content in another academic area in order to explore the connections between the two areas. Content will be integrated to develop the students’ skills and content knowledge in the participating academic areas as well as to provide opportunities for students to understand the relationship between the specific content and between the academic areas in general. Laboratory experiences vary depending on topic.

    Prerequisite: Foundations course work in math and science.
    Lecture 3 hours

Special Topics/Independent Research in General Education Courses

  
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    LUEG 3xn3 - Engagements: (selected topic) (3) F, SP


    A multidisciplinary course, co-taught by at least one faculty member and faculty or professionals from other disciplines, that investigates a particular theme, using insights, methods and habits of thought from the liberal arts (math, sciences, humanities, and the fine arts), Bible and other academic disciplines to connect a student’s major to the theme through project-based learning. This course meets an elective Bible requirement and is a LIGHT-designated course.

    Prerequisites: minimum of 60 hours earned credit.
  
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    LUHI 2xn3 - Explorations in History: (selected topic) (3) F, SP


    Topics for this course partner periods of history with content in another academic area in order to explore the connections between the two areas. Course content will be integrated to develop the students’ skills and content knowledge in the participating academic areas as well as to provide opportunities for students to understand the relationship between the specific content and between the academic areas in general.

  
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    LULT 2xn3 - Explorations in Literature: (selected topic) (3) F, SP


    Topics for this course partner periods or genres of literature with content in another academic area in order to explore the connections between the two areas. Content will be integrated to develop the students’ skills and content knowledge in the participating areas as well as to provide opportunities for students to understand the relationship between the specific content and between the academic areas in general.

    Prerequisites: EN 1313 .
  
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    LUSS 2xn3 - Explorations in Social Science: (selected topic) (3) F


    Topics for this course partner content in psychology; sociology; economics; political science; law, justice & society with each other or with content in another academic area in order to explore the connections between the two areas. Course content is integrated to develop the students’ skills and content knowledge in the participating academic areas as well as to provide opportunities for students to understand the relationship between the specific content and between the academic areas in general.


German Courses

  
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    GE 1114 - Elementary German I (4) F, SU


    An introduction to the German language including pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, reading, writing, conversation and cultures of the Germanic world. Three hours of classwork per week supplemented by a corequisite weekly interactive culture lab session directed by the course instructor. German 1114 and GE 1124  must be taken in conjunction with the required interactive culture lab which is an integral part of the learning and grading of the course.

    Prerequisite to GE 1124 : German 1114 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or higher.
    Lab fee: $20.
  
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    GE 1124 - Elementary German II (4) SP, SU


    An introduction to the German language including pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, reading, writing, conversation and cultures of the Germanic world. Three hours of classwork per week supplemented by a corequisite weekly interactive culture lab session directed by the course instructor. GE 1114  and 1124 must be taken in conjunction with the required interactive culture lab which is an integral part of the learning and grading of the course.

    Prerequisite to German 1124: GE 1114  or equivalent with a grade of “C” or higher.
    Lab fee: $20.
  
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    GE 2114 - Intermediate German I (4) F


    A continuation of the development of German language and culture skills, including an introduction to Germanic civilization and literature. Three hours of classwork per week supplemented by a corequisite weekly interactive culture lab session directed by the course instructor. German 2114 and GE 2124  must be taken in conjunction with the required interactive culture lab which is an integral part of the learning and grading of the course.

    Prerequisite to GE 2124 : German 2114 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or higher.
    Lab fee: $20.
  
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    GE 2124 - Intermediate German II (4) SP


    A continuation of the development of German language and culture skills, including an introduction to Germanic civilization and literature. Three hours of classwork per week supplemented by a corequisite weekly interactive culture lab session directed by the course instructor. GE 2114  and 2124 must be taken in conjunction with the required interactive culture lab which is an integral part of the learning and grading of the course.

    Prerequisite to German 2124: GE 2114  or equivalent with a grade of “C” or higher.
    Lab fee: $20.
  
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    GE 3113 - Advanced Grammar and Composition (3) SP


    Study of problems in grammar and writing. May be repeated for credit with prior approval.

    Prerequisite: GE 2114  and GE 2124 .
    Lab Fee: $20.
  
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    GE 3123 - Advanced Conversation and Phonetics (3) F


    Further training in the use of contemporary German in practical situations with emphasis on phonetic accuracy and conversational fluency.

    Prerequisite: GE 2114  and GE 2124 .
    May be repeated for credit with prior approval.
    Lab Fee: $20.
  
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    GE 3133 - German Historical Culture (3) F


    A study of Germanic and German culture as reflected in mythology, literature, geography, history, art, architecture and music from the earliest times down to the beginning of the modern period. A literary emphasis will concern texts from the Germanic, Old High German, Middle High German, and Early New High German periods as well as the Barock and Enlightenment movements. Offered in alternate years

    Prerequisite: GE 2114  and GE 2124 .
    Satisfies the general education humanities literature requirement.
  
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    GE 3143 - Commercial German (3) SP


    Introduction to vocabulary, syntax, and composition, both oral and written, needed to prepare students to work in German-speaking business situations. Offered in alternate years

    Prerequisite: GE 2114  and GE 2124 .
    Lab Fee: $20.
  
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    GE 4113 - Survey of German Literature I (3) F


    German literature from 1700 to 1840. Literary and cultural survey from the Enlightenment period through 19th-century Romanticism (including Storm and Stress, Classicism, Romanticism, and das Junge Deutschland). Offered in alternate years

    Prerequisite: GE 2114  and GE 2124 .
    Satisfies the general education humanities literature requirement.
  
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    GE 4123 - Survey of German Literature II (3) SP


    German literature since 1840. Survey of post- Romantic German literary movements (Realism, Naturalism) in the 19th century and primary literary figures in the 20th century (Hauptmann, Kafka, Mann, Hesse, Brecht, Boll, Grass) with emphasis on the Novelle of Poetic Realism and on the contemporary short story. Offered in alternate years

    Prerequisite: GE 2114  and GE 2124 .
    Satisfies the general education humanities literature requirement.

Global Learning Courses

  
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    GL 110V - The Cross-Cultural Experience (1-3)


    Its aim is to place the experience of living abroad in a meaningful context so that students are provided with a sense of the historical and contemporary culture of the city and country in which they study. This course incorporates an interdisciplinary approach to the topics of identity and culture by examining Christian theology, history, cultural studies, political science, commerce, art and music to develop a snapshot of host culture. You will derive meaningful interpretations of identity and culture while comparing these perceptions to our own preconceived understandings of American identity and culture. Based upon your perceptions and growth throughout the semester, you will also reflect upon how “life abroad” has impacted your own sense of identity.

  
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    GL 1203 - City as Text (3) SU


    Provides a study of a specific location or region that will vary. The course content will focus on experiential learning and investigating the city or region as a “textbook.” Appropriate readings will be assigned to prepare students for a deeper understanding of the topic or topics included in the course. The basis for the course material and topics will be heavily based on the faculty member’s area of expertise and the location selected.


Graduation Courses

  
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    GN 999X - Graduation Course 0


    Students must be registered for this course the semester all course work will be completed for graduation. Students are responsible for logging into Blackboard and completing the course requirements. Students must register for and complete this course in order to graduate.


Greek Courses

  
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    GR 1515 - Introduction to Greek I (5) F


    A study of Greek grammar. Careful drill in forms, pronunciation and translation.

    Prerequisite to GR 1525 : Greek 1515 with a minimum grade of “C.”
  
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    GR 1525 - Introduction to Greek II (5) SP


    A study of Greek grammar. Careful drill in forms, pronunciation and translation.

    Prerequisite to 1525: GR 1515  with a minimum grade of “C.”
  
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    GR 3013 - The Greek New Testament I (3) F, SP, SU


    Readings from the Greek New Testament.

    Prerequisite: GR 1525  with a minimum grade of “C.” Greek 3013 must be taken first.
  
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    GR 3023 - The Greek New Testament II (3) F, SP, SU


    Readings from the Greek New Testament.

    Prerequisite: GR 1525  with a minimum grade of “C.” Greek 3013 must be taken first.
  
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    GR 3033 - The Greek New Testament III (3) F, SP, SU


    Readings from the Greek New Testament.

    Prerequisite: GR 1525  with a minimum grade of “C.” GR 3013  must be taken first.
  
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    GR 4013 - Advanced New Testament Greek I (3) F, SP, SU


    Advanced study of selected portions of the New Testament together with readings from Hellenistic Greek.

    Prerequisite: GR 1525  with a minimum grade of “C.”
  
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    GR 4023 - Advanced New Testament Greek II (3) F, SP, SU


    Advanced study of selected portions of the New Testament together with readings from Hellenistic Greek.

    Prerequisite: GR 1525  with a minimum grade of “C.”
  
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    GR 4033 - Advanced New Testament Greek III (3) F, SP, SU


    Advanced study of selected portions of the New Testament together with readings from Hellenistic Greek.

    Prerequisite: GR 1525  with a minimum grade of “C.”

Special Topics/Independent Research in Greek Courses

  
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    GR 450V - Independent Study in Greek (1, 2, 3) Offered on demand


    Independent study in Greek with translation, grammatical and exegetical exercises as approved by supervising professor.

    Limit: 6 hours.

Hebrew Courses

  
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    HB 1515 - Introduction to Hebrew I (5) F Offered in alternate years


    Emphasis on Hebrew vowel points, vocabulary, verb conjugation, practice in translation, syntax and other grammatical phenomena.

    Prerequisite to HB 1525 : Hebrew 1515 with a minimum grade of “C.”
  
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    HB 1525 - Introduction to Hebrew II (5) SP Offered in alternate years


    Emphasis on Hebrew vowel points, vocabulary, verb conjugation, practice in translation, syntax and other grammatical phenomena.

    Prerequisite to 1525: HB 1515  with a minimum grade of “C.”
  
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    HB 3013 - The Hebrew Old Testament I (3) F Offered in alternate years, SP Offered in alternate years, SU Offered in alternate years


    Readings in Old Testament books with emphasis on building vocabulary, reviewing verb forms and making occasional comparative studies in the Septuagint and New Testament.

    Prerequisite: HB 1525  with a minimum grade of “C.” Hebrew 3013 must be taken first.
  
  •  

    HB 3023 - The Hebrew Old Testament II (3) F Offered in alternate years, SP Offered in alternate years, SU Offered in alternate years


    Readings in Old Testament books with emphasis on building vocabulary, reviewing verb forms and making occasional comparative studies in the Septuagint and New Testament.

    Prerequisite: HB 1525  with a minimum grade of “C.” HB 3013  must be taken first.
  
  •  

    HB 3033 - The Hebrew Old Testament III (3) F Offered in alternate years, SP Offered in alternate years, SU Offered in alternate years


    Readings in Old Testament books with emphasis on building vocabulary, reviewing verb forms and making occasional comparative studies in the Septuagint and New Testament.

    Prerequisite: HB 1525  with a minimum grade of “C.” HB 3013  must be taken first.

Special Topics/Independent Research in Hebrew Courses

  
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    HB 450V - Independent Study in Hebrew (1, 2, 3) Offered on demand


    Independent study in Hebrew with translation, grammatical and exegetical exercises as approved by supervising professor.

    Limit: 6 hours.

History Courses

  
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    HI 1013 - World Civilization I (3) F


    A survey of the major civilizations of the world, emphasizing the most significant trends, personalities and events in Asian, African, European and American civilizations from 4500 B.C. to A.D. 1500.

  
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    HI 1023 - World Civilization II (3) SP


    Same as HI 1013  except begins at 1500 and continues to present.

  
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    HI 1113 - Foundations of Western Civilization to 1600 (3) F, SP, SU


    A survey of the major personalities, events and trends in the early history of Western civilization.

  
  •  

    HI 1123 - Foundations of Western Civilization Since 1600 (3) F, SP, SU


    A survey of the major personalities, events and trends in Western civilization since the Reformation.

  
  •  

    HI 2213 - History of the United States I (3) F, SP, SU


    European backgrounds to the Civil War.

  
  •  

    HI 2223 - History of the United States II (3) F, SP, SU


    Civil War to the present.

  
  •  

    HI 3013 - Historiography (3) F


    An introduction to the discipline of history that includes schools of thought, methods of research, along with historical writing and presentation.

  
  •  

    HI 3053 - Methods of Teaching History (3) F


    To be taken before the Professional Semester. The major requirement is the construction of a teaching unit.

  
  •  

    HI 3063 - History of Medicine and Related Sciences (3) F


    The study of medical research and health care since ancient times. Course is normally offered in alternate years. See academic chair for details.

  
  •  

    HI 3103 - Ancient Civilizations (3) SP


    A survey of ancient civilizations beginning with the rise of Mesopotamia and Egypt and progressing through the fall of the Roman Empire. Special attention will be given to the Classical World of Greece and Rome.

  
  •  

    HI 3113 - Medieval Europe (3) F*


    A survey of Medieval civilization from the fall of the Roman Empire to the eve of the modern world.

  
  •  

    HI 3123 - Renaissance and Reformation (3) SP


    A course emphasizing the Italian and Northern Renaissances and the Protestant and Catholic Reformation movements. Course is normally offered in alternate years. See academic chair for details.

  
  •  

    HI 3133 - Eighteenth Century Europe (3) F


    This course spans Europe from the Treaty of Westphalia to the defeat of Napoleon. Course is normally offered in alternate years. See academic chair for details.

  
  •  

    HI 3143 - Nineteenth Century Europe (1815-1914) (3) SP


    A study that begins with the fall of Napoleon and continues to the outbreak of World War I.

  
  •  

    HI 3153 - Twentieth Century Europe (1914-present) (3) F


    Beginning with World War I, this course continues to the present.

  
  •  

    HI 3203 - Colonial America (3) F


    A survey of the Colonial Americas ending with the American Revolution.

    Prerequisite: HI 2213  or permission of the instructor. Course is normally offered in alternate years. See academic chair for details.
  
  •  

    HI 3213 - National Period (1776-1850) (3) SP


    This course covers the origin of American institutions and the development of American life, politics and culture form the decision to declare independence in 1776 to the Compromise of 1850.

    Prerequisite: HI 2213  or permission of the instructor. Course is normally offered in alternate years. See academic chair for details.
  
  •  

    HI 3243 - Civil War and Reconstruction (1850-1877) (3) F


    Beginning with the Compromise of 1850, this course stresses the division of the United States to the end of the Reconstruction era.

    Prerequisite: HI 2223  or permission of the instructor. Course is normally offered in alternate years. See academic chair for details.
  
  •  

    HI 3253 - Foundations of 20th Century America (1877-1941) (3) SP


    A study emphasizing Industrialism, Populism, Progressivism, World War I, the Roaring ‘20s and the New Deal.

    Prerequisites: HI 2223  or permission of the instructor. Course is normally offered in alternate years. See academic chair for details.
 

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