Sep 26, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Social Work Courses

  
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    SW 3223 - Social Work with Aging (3) F


    An ecological, systems perspective is utilized to understand the physical, spiritual, social and psychological aspects of aging in diverse populations. The implications of aging for the family unit, as well as the political, legal and economic systems are explored. Emphasis is placed upon ethical practice, as students prepare to provide direct services to aging individuals and their families, to recognize service needs and gaps, and to become advocates for improvements in policy and services.

  
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    SW 3313 - Child Welfare (3) F


    A study of the child welfare system and how services are provided to children and their families. Emphasis is placed on home-based services, child abuse and neglect, foster care, residential care, adoption and services to maternity clients.

  
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    SW 3333 - Juvenile Justice (3) SP


    This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the development of the juvenile justice system, its structure, current issues and problems and the role of social work within this system.

  
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    SW 3533 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment I (3) F


    This course focuses on the diversity of individuals, examining the biological, social-structural, psychological and cultural sources of human behavior. Systems theory and an ecological perspective are utilized in understanding the development of individuals and families throughout the life cycle. A planned change model approach provides the framework for addressing individual and family issues within the context of the environment in which they exist.

    Prerequisites: SW 1103 , SO 1123 , PS 1113 .
  
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    SW 3543 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment II (3) SP


    This course continues to develop the framework presented in SW 3533 , examining the definition and development of families, groups, organizations and communities. Traditional and alternative perspectives are examined in defining and understanding the development and behavior of each of these groups. Utilizing systems theory and an ecological perspective as a framework for planned change, the course will focus on understanding for the purpose of intervening with and on behalf of diverse families, groups, organizations and communities.

    Prerequisites: SW 3113 , SW 3533 .
    Prerequisite or corequisite: BY 2213 .
  
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    SW 3613 - Social Work Practice I (3) SP


    This course is designed to assist the student in a critical study of generalist social work practice. Such a practice is characterized by a working knowledge of generalist methods of planned change to be used in direct services to individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. This course focuses on micro and mezzo practice and places special emphasis on broad-based knowledge and skill for intervention with families and groups. This is the second semester of work of the social work practice sequence.

    Prerequisites: SW 1103 , SW 2313 , SW 2333 , SW 3533 . Open to social work majors only.
  
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    SW 3623 - Social Work Practice II (3) F


    A continuation of SW 3613  this course focuses on the philosophy, knowledge base and methods of social work intervention, with emphasis placed on organization and community change. Utilizing experiences from SW 3632 , the student participates in self-evaluation, as well as agency analysis and evaluation. Strategies for identifying needed changes and maximizing available resources are examined.

    Prerequisite: SW 3543 , SW 3613  and PS 3513 .
    Must be taken concurrently with SW 3632 . Open to social work majors only.
  
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    SW 3632 - Social Work Practicum I (2) F


    Practice in a social work field is an important part of social work education. This course provides an opportunity for an initial planned experience in a social work agency. Requires a minimum of 8 hours per week in the agency and one hour per week in class. The student must make application for placement and be accepted by social work faculty.

    Prerequisite: SW 4513 .
    Must be taken concurrently with SW 3623 . Open to social work majors only.
  
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    SW 4513 - Research Methods (3) SP


    The research methods course is designed to acquaint the student with a practical understanding of science and its relationship to social work practice, through a review of research methods and strategies, program evaluation, scientific terminology and relevant ethical issues necessary for becoming an effective generalist social worker.

    Prerequisite: MA 1043  or a higher level course.
  
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    SW 4523 - Applied Social Work Research Methods (3) F


    The research methods course is designed to provide students the hands-on opportunity to utilize research knowledge in the design and completion of an incremental research project, working alongside and receiving feedback from peers, as well as the course instructor.

    Prerequisites: SW 2313 , SW 3613 , SW 4513  and SO 1123 . Open to social work majors only.
    This course may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement.
  
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    SW 4903 - Seminar in Social Work Practice (3) SP


    This course provides an opportunity for the students to analyze their field experiences and integrate theory with practice. Students meet for three hours each Friday to demonstrate competence in applying curricular content to the practicum setting and responsibilities therein. Students discuss and debate the practicalities and realities of delivering social welfare services-to individuals, groups or communities-with an emphasis on the student’s pursuing his or her major career interest.

    Taken concurrently with SW 491B . Open to social work majors only.

Special Topics/Independent Research/Practicum in Social Work Courses

  
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    SW 3nnV - Special Topics Course (1, 2, 3)


    This course provides an opportunity for the examination of special issues or participation in unique experiences beyond basic social work curriculum. Examples may include issues that are particularly timely and relevant to social work practice as a result of social, political or economic factors present at a given time. Course may include community service or service learning component.

  
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    SW 401V - Independent Readings and Research (1, 2, 3) Offered on demand


    Directed individual reading and study in one or more specialized areas of social work, designed to strengthen and enhance the student’s knowledge.

  
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    SW 491B - Social Work Practicum II (12) SP


    The student will be assigned to a social service agency for a total of 375 hours. The agency will provide a planned experience in social work practice with individuals, groups and communities under professional supervision. The student must complete an application and be accepted by social work faculty for placement.

    Prerequisites: SW 3623 , SW 3632 . Open to social work majors only in the Spring of the Senior year.

Theatre Courses

  
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    TH 1513 - Acting I: Realism (3) F


    Basic training in acting choices, stage technique and creating a character. Involves scene work and character analysis, includes laboratory. Laboratory graded and credited with course.

  
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    TH 1533 - Text Analysis (3) SP


    Students learn basic concepts of dramatic theory and apply them in a critical examination of plays, using five different methods to achieve a detailed understanding of a playscript in preparation for a production.

  
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    TH 2011 - Contemporary Plays (1) F


    In this course, students will study contemporary plays, particularly those written within the last 30 years.  The plays cover a wide range of topics, cultures, and themes. The overall intention is to increase theatrical literacy and awareness, as well as analytical skills regarding the intersections of content and play form. 

    Prerequisite TH 1533
  
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    TH 2021 - Contemporary Musicals (1) F, odd years


    In this course, students will study contemporary American musicals, particularly those written in the last 25 years. The musicals cover a wide range of topics, cultures, and themes. The overally intention is to increase theatrical literacy and awareness, as well as analytical skills regarding the intersections of content and musical form.

    Prerequisite TH 1533
  
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    TH 2033 - Fundamentals of Design 3 SP


    This course is a study of the design process using the fundamentals and principles of design. The student will work through a design concept from inception to market, develop drawing abilities in various drawing styles, and work with a community partner merging creativity and design with serving others. This course satisfies the SALT Tier II requirement.

  
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    TH 2043 - Visual History (3) F Offered odd-numbered years


    This course examines the history and application of architecture, furniture, decoration, and clothing styles as they relate to designing in theatre, film, and entertainment.

  
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    TH 2103 - Dance Composition (3) F, even-numbered years


    Dance Composition introduces students to the basic elements of compositional techniques: theme, symmetry and asymmetry, development of movement phrases, elements imposed by working with more than one dancer, use of space and dynamics.

  
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    TH 2113 - Beginning Directing (3) F


    Basic principles governing play structures, directorial approaches and casting are discussed. Requires student directed scenes with lab. Laboratory graded and credited with course.

    Prerequisite: TH 1533  
  
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    TH 2123 - Voice and Diction for the Stage (3) SP


    Voice and diction fundamentals, used to develop vocal resonance, projection and articulation, as well as the natural connection of voice to action playing.

    Prerequisite: TH 1513 .
  
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    TH 2131 - Dance Technique: Various styles (1) F, SP


    A practical class for developing the performer’s technique in various forms of dance for the musical theatre.

  
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    TH 2143 - Movement for the Stage (3) SP


    Theory and application of movement, combat techniques, the Alexander technique, the elements of a physical regimen in order to develop physical coordination, flexibility, strength, spontaneity and awareness of the body in presentational space.

    Prerequisite: TH 1513 .
  
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    TH 2153 - Acting II: Meisner (3) F


    An application of the Meisner approach to acting, toward producing a scene/character study based on a modern American play.

    Prerequisite: TH 1513 .
  
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    TH 2223 - Playwriting (3) SP Offered even-numbered years


    This course is designed to encourage and nurture Christian playwrights. It will introduce students to playwriting terms and strategies, while applying the process of defining and analyzing the dramatic elements in a play script. By the end of the course, students will write a one-act play.

  
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    TH 2253 - Stage Combat (3) SP Offered even-numbered years


    This course will teach students how to use safe and effective stage fighting techniques.

  
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    TH 2453 - Introduction to Technical Theatre (3) F, SP


    Analyzes technical problems of production, including construction, scene design and lighting.

  
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    TH 3013 - Makeup for the Stage (3) F, SP


    Practical application of all processes and types of stage makeup. Theatre majors only.

  
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    TH 3043 - Acting III: Improvisation (3) F


    Improvisational techniques explore the inner sources of spontaneous creation by exercising commitment and creative freedom in each moment of performance. Students will study improvisational theory and enact performance sessions designed to build spontaneous awareness.

  
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    TH 3053 - Costume Design (3) Offered on demand


    Costume designing from a production approach through design theory, figure drawing and a study of fabric. Theatre majors only or consent of instructor.

    Prerequisite: TH 2033
  
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    TH 3063 - Lighting Design (3) Offered on demand


    Teaches students the concepts of lighting design and lighting technology. Students will learn how to implement communication, technology, organization and creativity in the lighting industry.

    Prerequisite: TH 2033
  
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    TH 3073 - Scene Design (3) SP Offered even-numbered years


    This course will allow students to develop drafting, rendering, painting, model-making and communication skills. Students will study historical, as well as contemporary, design techniques.

    Prerequisite: TH 2033
  
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    TH 3083 - Musical Theatre History (3) F Offered odd-numbered years


    An online course involving watching musicals and reading about their history, this class will teach students about the evolution of the American musical.

  
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    TH 3093 - Dramaturgy (3) Offered on demand


    This course defines the role of dramaturgy as literary advisor in the process of producing plays. Various methods of research into the historical, cultural, and literary background of a play will be discussed and applied.

  
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    TH 3113 - Intermediate Directing (3) SP Offered even-numbered years


    Principles of directing musical theatre, including staging techniques techniques and working with choreographers, music directors, and accompanists are explored. 

    Prerequisite: TH 2113  
  
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    TH 3123 - Choreography (3) SP Offered odd-numbered years


    Examines strategies and techniques involved in creating dance compositions for multiple dance styles and performance types. S tudents gain experience with casting, choreographing, and teaching.  Consent of instructor required.

    Prerequisite TH 2103.
  
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    TH 3133 - Stage Management (3) SP


    Work through the Stage Management process from pre-production to post-production. Learning from area professionals and practicing on productions simultaneously; it is recommended to enroll in the Stage Management section of practicum when taking this course concurrently.

    Prerequisite: TH 2453  
  
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    TH 3143 - Dance History (3) Offered on demand


    In this course, students will the history of various dance forms, including but not limited to: ballet, jazz, tap, and modern dance. Students will study the development of dance, innovations of the craft, and key choreographers and influencers. The course will also examine critical theory and the intersections of cultural and performance. 

  
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    TH 3153 - Musical Theatre Scene Study (3) SP Offered even-numbered years


    This course is designed for advanced musical theatre students seeking to bring together acting, music, and movement techniques in order to bring characters to life onstage.  The course will focus on musicals from the 20th-21st centuries.

  
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    TH 3163 - Audition Technique (3) F


    This course serves as a practical guide for performance students seeking to audition in the post-graduate and professional world of theatre.

  
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    TH 3173 - Theatre Drafting and Rendering (3) On demand


    This course introduces technical drafting and detail rendering in theatre. The student will learn to create and use ground plans, sections, elevations, light/sound plots, and scaling. The successful student will master skills such as lineweight, linetype, proportion, perspective drawing, 3D drawing, rendering, computer drafting, image manipulation, and animation. The student will use a variety of guided activities and assignments to produce a portfolio of work presented at the end of the semester.

    Prerequisite TH 2453.
  
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    TH 3403 - Methods of Teaching Theatre (3) On demand


    This course equips the theatre education major with an introduction to curriculum development and classroom activities to teach drama classes in high school or junior high settings. Field placement opportunities.

  
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    TH 3413 - Creative Dramatics (3) SP Offered even-numbered years


    An overview of children’s theatre: understanding the literature, acting techniques, design concepts, and the production presentation. Field placement opportunities.

    This course may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement.
  
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    TH 3433 - History of Theatre I (3) F


    Theatre history from its Greek origins to 18th century European practice.

    Prerequisite: TH 1533 .
  
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    TH 3443 - History of Theatre II (3) S


    Theatre history from 19th century romanticism to modern theory and practice.

    Prerequisite: TH 1533 .
  
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    TH 3491 - Theatre Workshop: Practicum (1) F, SP


    A practical course in technical aspects of dramatic production. The course may be repeated each semester for credit up to 8 hours.

  
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    TH 4013 - Acting V: Shakespeare (3) SP Offered even-numbered years


    This course focuses on Shakespeare and is designed to help actors develop their approach to Shakespeare’s plays. Emphasis is placed on the mechanics of analyzing, interpreting, and internalizing Shakespeare’s texts with the end goal of bringing them to full emotional and creative life. Students also study Shakespeare’s canon and place as a historical figure. For theatre majors only.

    Prerequisites: TH 1513 , TH 2153 .
  
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    TH 4023 - Advanced Directing (3) SP Offered odd-numbered years


    Principles of directing various styles and periods focusing on the ability of the director to bring a creative viewpoint to bear on the work. Requires student-directed scenes with lab. Laboratory is graded and credited with course. For theatre majors only.

    Prerequisite: TH 2113 .
  
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    TH 4033 - Acting IV: Period Styles (3) SP Offered odd-numbered years


    This course introduces an approach to performing in a range of historic works through reorganization of basic acting methods. It will familiarize students with classical dramatic literature. It will also teach them how to use textual clues to understand character development, while applying various acting styles in performance. Through their study of period styles and acting, students will also find the correlation between faith and art.

    Prerequisites: TH 1513 , TH 2153 .
  
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    TH 4043 - Musical Theatre Performance Workshop (3) F Offered even-numbered years


    This course will allow students to explore all aspects of musical theatre performance. Students will work with musical theatre productions for the 18th-20th centuries. Students will also be taught the singing, acting and technical aspects of musical theatre.

  
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    TH 4102 - Senior Seminar I (2) F


    This course is designed to assist students in making the transition from college to the “real world.” Through the development and understanding of creating resumes, auditioning and creating professional goals, students will be prepared to enter the professional world with confidence.

    Prerequisites: senior standing and approval of the instructor.
  
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    TH 4112 - Senior Seminar II (2) SP


    This course is designed to assist students in making the transition from college to the “real world.” Through the development and understanding of creating resumes, auditioning and creating professional goals, students will be prepared to enter the professional world with confidence.

    Prerequisites: senior standing and the approval of the instructor.
  
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    TH 4113 - Costume Technology 1,2,3 On demand


    Examines various craft skills and materials used in costume construction including techniques such as dyeing, painting, distressing textiles, creation of patterns, construction of buckram, wire, and wool felt bases, fitting, finishing, and trimming. It is recommended to also enroll in the Costume section of practicum when taking this course concurrently.

    Prerequisite: TH 2453  
  
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    TH 4123 - Theatre Technology 1,2,3 On demand


    A study in advanced areas of interest within Theatre Technology such as the use of alternative materials, processes not as frequently used in production, advanced technology like computerized production tools, operations in productions, lighting and audio systems, show control, and hydraulic / pneumatic scenery systems.

    Prerequisite: TH 2453  
  
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    TH 4133 - Advanced Design (3) Offered on demand


    This course will build on theatrical design skills developed in first level design courses to enable students to continue to grow and explore their voices as a designer, and to gain insights into how to market themselves and their work in the professional arena.

    Prerequisite TH 2453.
  
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    TH 4143 - Design for the Screen (3) Offered on demand


    This course is a study into design areas for film, television, video or commerical projects. Areas of featured design include costume, production, lighting, sound, and art department work (including special effects, properties, and set decoration). Student projects will provide opportunities for collaboration, script analysis, managing budgets and timelines, color, storyboarding, research, design for special effects, and designing for location.

    Prerequisite: TH 2033
  
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    TH 4903 - Theatre in New York (3) W


    This capstone course requires a week-long excursion to New York City, the world’s theatre capitol. BFA students will view Broadway and Off-Broadway productions, read and discuss critical texts, and execute a specified performance or interview-focused workshop that will give them critical experience and important networking connections.


Special Topics/Independent Research in Theatre Courses

  
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    TH 4nnV - Special Topics (1-6) F, SP


    Various topics in dramatic literature and performance. (Examples: advanced scene design, advanced playwriting, etc.) Requires consent of the instructor.


University Orientation Courses

  
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    LS 0020 - Learning Skills and Reading Improvement (2 non-credit hours) F


    Intensive practice in methods of understanding and retaining textbook material and other reading material through context clues, vocabulary growth, analysis and organization of ideas, inference and critical thinking. Students in LS0020 will also be required to participate in supplemental instruction workshops and seminars if the instructor deems it necessary to do so. These workshops will cover topics relevant to academic success, such as time management and test-taking. The skills are presented in a supportive atmosphere, and every effort is made to have the students practice the skills with their current classes.

  
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    UN 1101 - Strategies of an Effective Learner (1)


    Strategies of an Effective Learner is designed to provide an orientation to the purposes of higher education, in general and to the institution. Specifically, it is intended to: 1) build self-esteem and confidence; 2) introduce study skills and habits necessary for being successful in a rigorous academic program; and 3) increase student awareness of academic resources and opportunities for involvement on the university campus.


Special Topics/Independent Research in University Orientation Courses

  
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    UN 13nV - Special Topics (1-2)


    Topics will focus on issues vital to a student’s academic and/or life success.


Professional Studies Online Course

  
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    PSAC 2103 - Accounting for Leaders (3)


    An introduction to financial and managerial accounting principles related to business leaders. This course covers financial statement preparation, financial reporting of cash, receivables, inventories, liabilities, and equity based on a user’s perspective. Various types of costing and operational budgeting will also be introduced in this course.

  
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    PSDT 1013 - Data Management Systems for Organizations (3)


    This course provides an introductory study of Data Management Systems (DMS), including systems and techniques for information acquisition, retrieval, visualization and decision making processes.  Critical examinations of the role of data management systems within public, private, and governmental organizations are explored.

  
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    PSDT 1023 - Introduction to Decision Support Systems (3)


    This course provides students with an introduction to the concepts and practices employed by systems used in the decision-making processes.  Basic techniques for information storage, query, retrieval, and visualization are explored, including a survey of modern decision support systems and how they are used to solve difficult or time-critical problems.

  
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    PSDT 2103 - Information Concepts and Design (3)


    This course provides a detailed introduction to the concepts, structure, and theories of information.  An introduction to data modeling and definitions is given, with emphasis on organizational data.  Basic concepts in design and query languages are explored.

  
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    PSDT 2113 - Database Administration for Organizational Support (3)


    This course covers basics of installation, configuration, and administration of database servers and applications.  Students are introduced to all the logical and physical components of database servers and infrastructures, as well as basic queries and query languages. Tools and strategies for access, allocation, management, queries, backup, recovery and migration are covered, with an emphasis on how these systems and operations support and enhance critical organizational functions.

  
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    PSDT 3013 - Analysis Tools for Organizational Leaders (3)


    This course examines current tools, technologies, trends and practices for data-driven analysis and the role those tools play in organizational decision-making.  This course includes a survey of modern desktop and cloud based applications for analytics.

  
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    PSDT 3023 - Enterprise Information Management and Analysis (3)


    This course takes an in-depth look at enterprise data management solutions and how data from multiple departments or organizations relate to each other.  An emphasis is placed on strategies surrounding data warehousing, extraction, transformation, and delivery.

  
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    PSDT 3113 - Networking Concepts and Applications (3)


    ​This course provides an introduction to networking concepts and networked application environments and applications. Emphasis is placed on the physical and logical design of networks, topologies, and layered applications. Topics include: the OSI model, network hardware technologies, internet protocols, wireless networks and security enhancements. Examples relevant to organizational implementations are explored.

  
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    PSDT 3123 - Information Security Management (3)


    The course introduces students to the broad realm of information security, with a focus on leadership and decision-making challenges surrounding the concepts of network security, vulnerabilities, risk management/mitigation techniques, security of physical resources, and relevant organizational policies and procedures. An overview of modern support applications, as well as certifications and professional responsibilities are included.

  
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    PSDT 3133 - Trends in Technology Management (3)


    ​This course will study current trends and modern applications in technology management and examines how those developments will impact future business processes and operations.

  
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    PSDT 4113 - Decision Support Systems Implementation (3)


    This project course focuses on implementing a Decision Support System within an organization.  Course projects are subject to instructor review.  Course emphasis includes change management, knowledge extraction and impacts on major business functions.

  
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    PSEC 2003 - Economic Concepts for Leaders (3)


    This course includes basic principles in the context of macroeconomics and microeconomics for leaders. Macroeconomic concepts studied in this course include the following: modern society and government policy, national income accounting, output determination, fiscal policy, the banking system and international trade. Microeconomic concepts introduced in this course include the following: modern society and business, scarcity and allocation of resources, supply and demand, American and global economies, and resource markets.

  
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    PSFI 2023 - Financial Acumen for Leaders (3)


    Financial planning and management techniques for leaders will be covered in this course. Topics for this course include the financial planning process, risk management, time value of money, budgeting, financial statements analysis, and working capital management.

  
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    PSMG 2013 - Management Principles for Leaders (3)


    This course consists of an introduction to basic management principles for leaders. Topics include effective management of a business which focuses on planning, organizing, coordinating, and controlling. Principles of management and leadership and their application to the development of improved managerial effectiveness will also be covered.

  
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    PSMG 3023 - Servant Leadership (3)


    This course explores principles and practices of servant leadership.  Students will demonstrate the key dimensions of servant leadership through service-learning opportunities.  Opportunities to discuss integration of faith and service in the workplace will be included in this course.  Emphasis will be placed on ethics and leadership in a dynamic and changing world.

  
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    PSMG 4013 - HR Management for Leaders (3)


    In this course, the methods and strategies of personnel management will be addressed. Proper procedures for recruitment, selection, motivation, promotion, training, performance evaluation, and compensation is covered. Legal aspects of managing people will be explored, as well as application to the development of improved effectiveness for leaders.

  
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    PSMK 2013 - Marketing Concepts for Leaders (3)


    This course consists of an introduction to basic marketing principles for leaders. Topics include an analysis of the roles, methods, costs and problems associated with any type of business. In this course, the role of marketing in society and the marketplace will be explored. Principles of marketing and leadership and their application to the development of improved effectiveness will also be covered.


Hospitality Courses

  
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    HOSP 1003 - Hospitality and Tourism 3 (F)


    This course teaches students how to identify, develop, and promote tourism and hospitality products and services. Issues such as marketing, sales, advertising, and promotion for the tourism and hospitality industry will be explored, along with basic planning and financial topics. Special emphasis will be placed on the impact of entertainment and the arts to the industry. 

  
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    HOSP 1013 - Entertainment Business 3 (SP)


    This course provides students with an overview of the entertainment business. It examines the various ways that entertainment organizations operate and generate profit from operations. Students will analyze traditional and emerging business models in various segments of the industry. Students will also explore career opportunities based on current and evolving models. 

  
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    HOSP 2013 - Hotel & Resort Management 3 (F), (SP)


    This course provides the opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge and practice in general relations, front office management, food and beverage, housekeeping and property management. Students gain hands-on experience in all aspects of day-to-day operations. 

  
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    HOSP 2023 - Food & Beverage 3 (F), (SP)


    This course will develop the skills required to work as a professional team member in a full service restaurant. Skills include service techniques, effective customer service skills, and obligation of the food and beverage industry. 

  
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    HOSP 2113 - Theme Parks and Attractions 3 (F), (SP)


    This course will give an in-depth and the detailed look at the different operational areas, management, and leadership of theme parks and attractions. 

  
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    HOSP 3003 - Revenue Management 3 (F), (SP)


    This course will provide an introduction to revenue management as a systematic process designated to increase revenue by leveraging tools designed to manage length-of-stay and apply effective pricing strategies. Students will have a range of projects to explore all current methods. 

  
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    HOSP 3013 - Entrepreneurship in Hospitality 3 (F), (SP)


    The course will provide the tools for students to create a business plan that includes the financial, human resources, and leadership components vital for the success in entrepreneurship activities of Hospitality and Tourism. 

  
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    HOSP 3113 - Catering 3 (F), (SP)


    This course will discuss the critical aspects involved in running a catering business including licenses, kitchen needs, food safety practices, party planning, cooking for a crowd, meal planning, pricing, and customer service. 

  
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    HOSP 4003 - Hospitality and Tourism Law 3 (F), (SP)


    Topics covered include: basic legal principles and procedure; the hotel-guest relationship; laws regarding food and beverage operations; legal standards of employee contracts; government regulations; management, franchise, commercial, and case law. Emphasis placed on understanding negotiations, mediation, and contract relationships between unions and management, as well as hospitality and tourism vendors, suppliers, and concessionaires. 

  
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    HOSP 4103 - Restaurant Management 3 (F), (SP)


    Students learn about administration, accounting, and human resources. They also learn the ways that managers plan, organize, and market restaurants. The courses will cover common duties of managers in food and beverage. 

  
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    HOSP 4113 - Real-Estate 3 (F), (SP)


    This course includes information and preparation needed to succeed in the Real- Estate field. This includes specialization in: deeds, titles, agency, contracts, finance, appraisal, escrow, and leases. 


Special Topics/Independent Study/Variable Length English Courses

  
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    EN 31n3 - Topics in Professional Writing (3)


    Students will develop professional writing skills by designing and producing a wide range of documents. Topics selected by the instructor may include new writing technologies for professional communication and presentation, analyzing verbal and visual rhetoric of traditional and electronic texts, and evaluating document usability.

    Prerequisite: EN 1313  with a grade of “B” or higher, or instructor permission.
  
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    EN 36n3 - Creative Writing (3) F, SP


    A focused study of creative writing targeting a single genre; genres will vary upon demand. Students will write, constructively critique each other’s work, and study the work of established writers in a workshop setting. Students will also be introduced to the process of entering literary competitions, researching publication opportunities, and submitting work for publication. Repeatable for credit.

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: EN 2913  
  
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    EN 46n3 - Seminar in American Literature (3) F, SP


    An advanced undergraduate seminar focusing intensively on a topic, theme, period, group, genre, etc., from American literature, selected by the instructor. Students will deliver class presentations, perform significant research and produce a substantial research project. Required of all English majors.

    Prerequisites: English 21n3, EN 2903 , EN 3013 , and 37n3.
  
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    EN 47n3 - Seminar in British Literature (3)


    An advanced undergraduate seminar focusing intensively on a topic, theme, period, group, genre, etc., from British literature, selected by the instructor. Students will deliver class presentations, perform significant research and produce a substantial research project.

    Prerequisites: English 21n3, EN 2903 , EN 3013 , and 37n3.
  
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    EN 48n3 - Seminar in World Literature (3)


    An advanced undergraduate seminar focusing intensively on a topic, theme, period, group, genre, etc., from world literature (in translation), selected by the instructor. Students will deliver class presentations, perform significant research, and produce a substantial research project.

    Prerequisites: English 21n3, EN 2903 , EN 3013 , and 37n3.
  
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    EN 49n3 - Seminar in Special Topics (3)


    An advanced undergraduate seminar focusing intensively on a topic, theme, period, group, genre, etc., that crosses traditional boundaries between subject areas. Students will deliver class presentations, perform significant research and produce a substantial research project.

    Prerequisites: English 21n3, EN 2903 , EN 3013 , and 37n3.
  
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    EN 219V - Studies in Literature (3) Offered on demand


    A study of a special topic in literature selected by the instructor. This course meets the general education sophomore literature requirement.

    Prerequisite: EN 1313 .
  
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    EN 300V - Practicum (1-3) Offered on demand


    A writing-related practicum for English majors, directly supervised by English department faculty. Offered on demand. Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. Assessment includes course portfolio. May be taken for SALT credit with instructor permission.

    Prerequisite: EN 3013 .
    Repeatable for up to 6 hours credit.
  
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    EN 310V - English Writing Studio Practicum 1-3 F, SP


    For those interested in the writing process, creative writing, teaching, or who expect to continue their English education at the graduate level. Students must have passed LU 1203 and EN 1313 with a ‘B’ or above. Students in the Practicum will work 4 hours/week in the Writing Studio (per credit hour) and will meet once every other week to discuss readings and tutoring experiences. 

    EN 1313 (B or above); LU 1203  (B or above)
 

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