Dec 03, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Special Topics/Independent Research in Data Science Courses

  
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    DS 350V - Special Topics in Data Science (1-3) Offered on demand


    Selected topics from the field of informatics and analytics. The course may be either lecture or laboratory oriented depending upon the topic selected. The study represents an in-depth approach to specific areas of interest to the students.

    Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.
    Repeatable for credit with director’s approval.

Developmental Courses

  
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    TP 0110 - Turning Point (1 non-credit hour) F, SP


    This course is designed to be offered as part of the Turning Point program. Emphasis is placed upon personal assessment, development of personal goals, accepting personal responsibility, effective self management strategies, changing self-defeating patterns of thinking and behavior and becoming life-long learners. Self examination and reflection will be encouraged through group discussions, personal journals and essay writing. Students who are required to participate in the Turning Point program may be required to enroll in TP 0110 if it is offered.


English for Academic Purposes Courses

  
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    EAP 1310 - Conversational English in Academic Settings - Intermediate F, SP, SU


    This course focuses on speaking and listening in an academic environment. The course will prepare students to listen to lectures, as well as lead and participate in discussions. Through presentation skills, structured listening activities, and working in groups on project-based assignments, students will practice pronunciation and listening comprehension exercises.

    participate 2 times maximum
    $75 textbook fee
  
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    EAP 1320 - Reading and Vocabulary - Intermediate F, SP, SU


    This intermediate course focuses on and practice academic reading in order to prepare for the collegiate environment. Additionally, students will learn specific reading strategies to aid in comprehension of nonfiction texts, as well as increase their academic language. Finally, students will regularly participate in structured discourse and produce written responses regarding a wide range of reading materials.

    participate 2 times maximum
    $75 textbook fee
  
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    EAP 1330 - Writing for Academic Purposes - Intermediate F, SP, SU


    This intermediate course focuses on the craft of writing in academic environments, as well as study grammar and the structure of the English language. Students will produce academically focused writing in the form of paragraphs.

    participate 2 times maximum
    $75 textbook fee
  
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    EAP 1340 - Studying in a University - Intermediate F, SP, SU


    This course orients students to life in an American university and instructs students to develop study habits and skills required for the academic rigor found in universities. Students will be introduced to Lipscomb University’s programs and resources, academic policies and expectations, as well as further develop technology and test-taking skills.

    participate 2 times maximum
    $75 Textbook Fee
  
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    EAP 1410 - Conversational English in Academic Settings - Pre-Advanced F, SP, SU


    This pre-advanced course prepares students for the speaking and listening demands found in academic environments. The course will prepare students to listen and respond to different types of lectures, to prepare for and deliver a variety of presentations, and lead and participate in discussions. Through structured listening and speaking activities and project-based assignments, students will improve listening comprehension and refine speaking proficiency.

    participate 2 times maximum
    $75 textbook fee
  
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    EAP 1420 - Reading and Vocabulary - Pre-Advanced F, SP, SU


    In this pre-advanced reading course, students will practice academic reading in order to prepare for the collegiate environment. Additionally, students will learn specific reading strategies to aid in comprehension of a variety of texts, as well as increase academic vocabulary. Finally, students will interact with a wide range of reading materials through structured discourse and written response.

    participate 2 times maximum
    $75 textbook fee
  
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    EAP 1430 - Writing for Academic Purposes - Pre-Advanced F, SP, SU


    This pre-advanced course focuses on the craft of writing in academic environments, as well as studying grammar and the structure of the English language. Students will produce academically focused writing pieces, such as paragraphs and essays.

    participate 2 times maximum
    $75 textbook fee
  
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    EAP 1440 - Studying in a University - Pre-Advanced F, SP, SU


    This pre-advanced course orients students to life in an American university and instructs students to solidify study habits and skills required for the academic rigor found in universities. With an emphasis on engaging with the academic community, students will learn how to access Lipscomb University’s programs and resources, understand academic policies and expectations, increase technology and test-taking skills, as well as review and apply new information and skills.

    participate 2 times maximum
    $75 textbook fee
  
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    EAP 1510 - Conversational English in Academic Settings - Advanced F, SP, SU


    This advanced oral communication course prepares students for speaking and listening demands found in academic environments. The course will prepare students for listening to different types of lectures, and preparation and delivery of speeches and presentations for different purposes and audiences. Through structured listening and speaking activities students will learn to apply skills that will be used in university settings.

    participate 2 times maximum
    $75 textbook fee
  
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    EAP 1520 - Reading and Vocabulary - Advanced F, SP, SU


    This advanced course focuses on academic reading in order to prepare for the collegiate environment. Students will learn to read for different purposes, including but not limited to reading for research and analyzing literature. Additionally, students will interact with a wide range of reading materials and further develop their vocabulary through structured discourse and written response.

    participation 2 times maximum
    $75 textbook fee
  
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    EAP 1530 - Writing for Academic Purposes - Advanced F, SP, SU


    This advanced course focuses on the craft of writing in academic environments, as well as perfecting grammar and the structure of the English language. Students will produce academically focused writing pieces, such as essays and a research paper.

    participation 2 times maximum
    $75 textbook fee
  
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    EAP 1540 - Studying in a University - Advanced F, SP, SU


    This advanced study skills course is designed specifically for students who intend to take the TOEFL or IELTS to meet entry requirements to universities. With an emphasis on formal assessment preparation, students will also apply technology and academic skills to prepare for exams and quizzes.

    participation 2 times maximum
    $75 textbook fee

Economics Courses

  
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    EC 2403 - Principles of Macroeconomics (3) F, SP, SU


    Basic economic principles in the context of modern society and government policy; national income accounting, output determination, fiscal policy, the banking system, monetary policy, and international trade.

  
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    EC 2413 - Principles of Microeconomics (3) F, SP, SU


    Basic economic principles in the context of modern society and business, including scarcity and the allocation of resources, supply and demand, the American economy, the global economy, market structures and resource markets.

  
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    EC 3603 - International Economics and Finance (3) F


    This course will focus on international trade as a sub-theme in the greater concert of the human struggle to survive and prosper that has continued, in essence unchanged, throughout the centuries. The emphasis will be on developing a framework for evaluating trade on a global basis.

    Prerequisites: FI 3503  

Education Courses

  
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    ED 2313 - Schooling in America (3) F, SP


    This course offers an orientation to the teacher education program at Lipscomb as well as to the social, historical and philosophical foundations of American education. The course is the prerequisite to all other education courses and is to be taken by the end of the sophomore year. This course must be taken at Lipscomb University. Students are required to attend a mandatory teacher education initiation retreat early in the semester. The specific days(s) will be listed when registering for the class.

  
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    ED 3323 - Planning for Learning (3) F, SP


    This course is designed to prepare 7-12 and K-12 majors for the realities of today’s classroom, with a specific focus on procedural practices for management, Common Core Curriculum standards, transforming standards into learning objectives, differentiating instructions, and writing and executing a lesson plan to teach and assess learning. Students in this course will work collaboratively with peers and with in-service teachers to create and adjust lesson plans appropriately. Technology use in instruction will be explored, as well as the importance of formative and summative assessments, collaborative team work/professional learning communities, and reflection and modification of teaching practices. A field experience is included.

     

    $25

  
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    ED 3343 - Cultural Perspectives in Education (3) F, SP, SU


    This course is to develop an appreciation of the cultural differences in classrooms; a sensitivity to the needs of students and families living in poverty; and relationships with peers, teachers and students in schools. Significant time will be spent in school settings. Journal writing, readings and reflection papers will be assigned to develop reflective practitioners. The course may be taken during Maymester as a trip into a culturally diverse environment. Travel fee will be extra for international trips.

    Prerequisite: Admission to the program.
    Travel fee will be extra.
  
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    ED 3353 - Characteristics and Assessment of Students with Disabilities (3) F, SP


    Understanding individual student needs is essential to a special educator. The primary purpose of this course is to help students learn about the various disabilities as described in the federal law, how the characteristics of each disability are manifested, as well as the impact they have on learning. Students will also learn how the disabilities are evaluated and how students are determined to be eligible for special education services. This course will also introduce assessment as it relates to determining the needs of each student in the classroom. 

  
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    ED 3363 - Teaching with Text (3) F, SP


    This course is an in-depth look into how to engage students in reading and responding to text. Candidates will explore different text genres and formats including fiction, non-fiction, digital, informational, and non-print to support inquiry and learning across the curriculum. The course will prepare candidates to engage students in close reading of text to analyze craft, structure, & rhetoric for the purpose of deeper comprehension. The course will examine text response through meaningful discussion, collaboration, and writing in a variety of formats for different audiences.  Candidates will learn to develop and support students to become lifelong readers through choice, environment, and exposure to diverse texts.

    Prerequisite: Admission to the program.
  
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    ED 3373 - Supporting Behavior of Students with Disabilities (3) SP


    Managing the learning environment is important for all educators. For special educators, specific learning differences of the students may make this skill even more essential. In this course, students will learn the importance of managing the learning environment and how to use the physical environment and community to build a safe, positive environment for all learners. Students will also learn the basics of classroom management theories and strategies while they develop their own classroom management plans. Student behavior related to disabilities will also be discussed along with research-based strategies to support behavior in the classroom. 

  
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    ED 3404 - Primary Education (4) F, SP, SU


    Focuses on designing developmentally appropriate activities that meet cognitive, socio-emotional and physical needs of primary learners. Additional topics of study are emergent literacy, learning centers and parent involvement. Students will design a back-to-school notebook with detailed procedures for the beginning of a school year. Includes a field experience in a primary classroom.  

    Prerequisite: Admission to the program.
    $15
  
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    ED 3451 - Early Childhood Practicum (1) Offered on demand


  
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    ED 3476 - Reading and Language Arts (6) F, SP


    This course is an in-depth look into research on how children become literate and the practical implications of this research for teachers. It focuses on equipping future teachers with the theoretical knowledge and pedagogical skills that will help them make appropriate instructional decisions as they teach children to become adept readers and writers. Assessment and diagnosis of the literacy strengths of a student and appropriate remediation techniques will be developed. A major field experience is required.  Should be taken later in program.

    Prerequisite: Admission to program.
    $15
  
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    ED 3533 - Math Methods (3) F, SP


    This course will create proficiency in principles of learning and teaching mathematics to diverse populations of elementary and middle school students. Candidates will learn to prepare instructional materials and create laboratory experiences that relate principles to practice.

    Prerequisite: Admission to the program.
  
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    ED 3546 - Instructional Methods for Special Education (6) SP


    Educating students with disabilities requires knowledge about the general curriculum, instructional strategies, and learning theories while balancing the special accommodations and strategies that might be needed based on a learner’s learning style. This course will introduce both general and specialized curricula that might be used with students with disabilities. Research- based instructional methods for problem solving, comprehension, memory, and other related deficits will also be discussed. This course will include a clinical practice placement in which students can observe and practice the instructional strategies they are learning. 

  
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    ED 3636 - Clinical Practice I (6) F, SP


    This course is designed to develop competencies in pre-service teachers related to lesson planning, teaching with a focus on differentiation and the exceptional child, classroom management, communication with school stakeholders, using technology in teaching and management, and becoming a reflective practitioner. This course includes a long-term field experience in which students will work in a diverse middle school.

    Prerequisites: ED 3323 , ED 3404 , ED 3476 , ED 3533  as program requires and admission to program.
    $20
  
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    ED 3649 - Clinical Practice II (9) F, SP


    Analysis of various methods and the basic factors in the teaching-learning process are considered in light of research-based teaching strategies and principles of learning in this course. The focus is on both short and long term instructional planning that incorporates formative and summative assessment and modifications to maximize student learning. Attention is given to adapting lessons for students with diverse needs, including those for whom English is a second language. This course includes a long-term field experience in which students will work in an elementary or high school, according to program.  

    Prerequisite: ED 3636 .
    $40
  
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    ED 3723 - Integrated Literacy (3) Offered on demand


    This course is an in-depth look at using a variety of strategies for integrating reading and writing across the curriculum and developing vocabulary and comprehension skills. It will help students understand how to identify and explore quality literature. It will also focus on using informational and exemplary texts to teach content, as well as evidence-based writing. Lastly, the course will address scaffolding and differentiation strategies for struggling readers.

    Prerequisite: ED 3476 .
  
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    ED 4043 - Complex Disabilities (3)


    Understanding individual student needs is essential for a special educator. The primary purpose of this course is to help students learn about the various needs of students with severe/profound and multiple disabilities as described in the federal law, including issues related to postsecondary transition.  Students will learn how to use assistive technology to meet the needs of students.  This course will also introduce alternative assessment, how to determine when to use and how to implement for appropriate students.

  
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    ED 4213 - Collaboration and Co-teaching (3) F


    The role of the special educator has changed in the last 20 years. Special Educators are now serving in a more collaborative role with general educators. They are often consulting and/or co-teaching in general education classrooms. This course will prepare students to work with other school staff, balance a caseload while supporting the needs of all students, and to effectively communicate with paraprofessionals. Specific strategies for collaboration, consultation, and co-teaching will be learned. In addition, the importance of communicating with families, as well as techniques to collaborate with families, will be discussed. 

  
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    ED 4223 - Communication, Language and Social Development (3) SP


    This course covers the development of communication, language, and social skills for typically developing children, as well as the deficits seen in these areas in children with disabilities. Students will learn the link between communication and behavior, the educational implications of communication and language impairments, and instructional strategies related to communication, language, and social skills. Research-based interventions such as social narratives, video-modeling, and augmentative communication will also be discussed. 

  
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    ED 4233 - Special Education Law and Ethics 3 F


     

     

    Special educators are responsible for knowing the federal and state law that governs the supports and services for students with disabilities. In this course, students will analyze the law and develop and understanding of communication and collaboration, preparing for and conducting meetings, accommodations and modifications, IEP writing, and transition planning. This course will also cover the ethical and professional role of special educators including confidentiality, effective communication and writing skills, and self-reflection.

    Prequisite: Admission into program

  
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    ED 4403 - Student Teaching Seminar (3) F, SP


    Taken concurrently with Clinical Practice III, this course meets multiple days throughout the semester in all-day sessions. It serves as professional development with specific segments dedicated to performance assessment preparation (edTPA), social-emotional learning, and a significant emphasis on the practice of traditional Christian virtues that includes care and concern for the poor; service to the disenfranchised; healing for the broken; development of economic opportunity for the marginalized; speech and/or action on behalf of justice in the public education system; peacemaking; etc. This emphasis allows provides a spiritual dimension to our course.  Licensure requirements include development of a final showcase portfolio for presentation, and developing and being evaluated on the C.A.R.E. framework in both placements. Students are required to attend all sessions, provide required documentation, and participate in activities related to each major objective. **Starting in Spring 2018, all student teacher candidates will be required to complete the edTPA assessment. Specific tools and preparation for edTPA will be a part of this course. The course fee ($300) attached to ED 4403 will fund a voucher to pay for the edTPA assessment. **If a student fails one or more sections of the edTPA assessment, the student must retake the course and/or remediate the failed sections as appropriate. The student is responsible for all costs related to remediation and retakes.

     

     

     

    Corequisite: ED 471C , ED 472C  ED 473C , ED 474C  or ED 475C .
    $300 edTPA fee


Special Topics/Independent Research/Clinical Practice in Education Courses

  
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    ED 4xx6 - Disability Studies Practicum (6)


    This practicum will give students the experience of working with a nonprofit organization that supports individuals with disabilities. Students will spend time observing how the organization works with individuals, family members, and community stakeholders to improve the lives of individuals with disabilities. Students will complete a reflection journal and a paper on their organization and experience.cleardot.gif

  
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    ED 46nV - Special Topics (1-3) Offered on demand


    Selected topics from the field of education are offered. The format of the course is determined by the topic. Field experiences may be required.

    Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
  
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    ED 450V - Independent Study in Education (1, 2, 3) F, SP, SU


    This course is designed to offer variable credit of one, two or three hours according to individual need. Permission of academic chair required.

    Prerequisite: Admission to program.
  
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    ED 471C - Clinical Practice III - PreK-3 (12) F, SP


    This course is the capstone experience required of all education majors - student teaching.  Observation and directed teaching for a minimum of 15 weeks in assigned P-12 schools are completed under the supervision of mentor teachers and a university supervisor.  Each student is placed in two varying classroom settings.  The student teaching application package must be submitted no later than the last day of the exams two semesters prior to student teaching.  The accompanying seminar serves to guide candidates through the student teaching experience.  Lipscomb provides an opportunity for candidates to do an international student teaching placement upon request. 

     

     

    Prerequisite: ED 3649 , application approval, interview, admission to the program, and passing scores on Praxis II Content Tests for one’s discipline. 
    Corequisite: ED 4403 .
    $400 fee.

  
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    ED 472C - Clinical Practice III - K-6 (12) F, SP


    This course is the capstone experience required of all education majors - student teaching.  Observation and directed teaching for a minimum of 15 weeks in assigned P-12 schools are completed under the supervision of mentor teachers and a university supervisor.  Each student is placed in two varying classroom settings.  The student teaching application package must be submitted no later than the last day of the exams two semesters prior to student teaching.  The accompanying seminar serves to guide candidates through the student teaching experience.  Lipscomb provides an opportunity for candidates to do an international student teaching placement upon request. 

    Prerequisite: ED 3649 , application approval, interview, admission to the program, and passing scores on Praxis II Content Tests for one’s discipline. 
    Corequisite: ED 4403 .
    $400 fee.
  
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    ED 473C - Clinical Practice III - 4-8 (12) F, SP


    This course is the capstone experience required of all education majors - student teaching.  Observation and directed teaching for a minimum of 15 weeks in assigned P-12 schools are completed under the supervision of mentor teachers and a university supervisor.  Each student is placed in two varying classroom settings.  The student teaching application package must be submitted no later than the last day of the exams two semesters prior to student teaching.  The accompanying seminar serves to guide candidates through the student teaching experience.  Lipscomb provides an opportunity for candidates to do an international student teaching placement upon request. 

    Prerequisite: ED 3649 , application approval, interview, admission to the program, and passing scores on Praxis II Content Tests for one’s discipline. 
    Corequisite: ED 4403 .
    $400 fee.
  
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    ED 474C - Clinical Practice III - 7-12 (12) F, SP


    This course is the capstone experience required of all education majors - student teaching.  Observation and directed teaching for a minimum of 15 weeks in assigned P-12 schools are completed under the supervision of mentor teachers and a university supervisor.  Each student is placed in two varying classroom settings.  The student teaching application package must be submitted no later than the last day of the exams two semesters prior to student teaching.  The accompanying seminar serves to guide candidates through the student teaching experience.  Lipscomb provides an opportunity for candidates to do an international student teaching placement upon request. 

    Prerequisite: ED 3649 , application approval, interview, admission to the program, and passing scores on Praxis II Content Tests for one’s discipline. 
    Corequisite: ED 4403 .
    $400 fee.
  
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    ED 475C - Clinical Practice III - K-12 & PreK-12 (12) F, SP


    This course is the capstone experience required of all education majors - student teaching.  Observation and directed teaching for a minimum of 15 weeks in assigned P-12 schools are completed under the supervision of mentor teachers and a university supervisor.  Each student is placed in two varying classroom settings.  The student teaching application package must be submitted no later than the last day of the exams two semesters prior to student teaching.  The accompanying seminar serves to guide candidates through the student teaching experience.  Lipscomb provides an opportunity for candidates to do an international student teaching placement upon request. 

     

    Prerequisite: ED 3649 , application approval, interview, admission to the program, and passing scores on Praxis II Content Tests for one’s discipline. 
    Corequisite: ED 4403 .
    $400 fee.


Electrical and Computer Engineering Courses

  
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    EECE 1423 - Digital Logic (3) F


    Introduction to digital logic design. Computing history, number theory, Boolean algebra, switching functions, Karnaugh maps, fundamental logic building blocks for modular combinational circuit design, memory elements, finite state machines, synchronous sequential circuit design, datapaths, counters, shifters, number representation in digital systems.

    Corequisite: ENGR 1113  with EECE lab section
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: MA 1123  or MA 1135  or MA 1314  
    Lecture, 3 hours
    Satisfies EECE 1123  
  
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    EECE 2013 - Survey of Electrical Engineering (3) SP


    A study of electric circuit DC and AC analysis, transient circuit analysis, frequency response and filters, complex power, and electromechanics.

    Prerequisite: MA 2314   and PH 2414   with a grade of “C” or higher.
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
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    EECE 2213 - Circuits I (3) SP


    A study of resistor network analysis including series-parallel, wye-delta, source transformations, node voltage and mesh current analysis. Also includes: Thevenin & Norton equivalent circuits, capacitance, inductance, mutual inductance and transformers as well as AC phasor analysis of RLC circuits, single phase power systems and application of operational amplifiers. Hands-on experience with circuit performance measurement and numerical methods.

    Prerequisite: ENGR 1113  with EECE lab section with a grade of “C” or higher and MA 1314  
    Lecture, 3 hours
  
  
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    EECE 2223 - Circuits II (3) F


    A study of transient response of RL/RC and RLC networks, Laplace and Fourier transform methods, and introduction to Z transforms. Filter design, including Butterworth filters with frequency and impedance scaling. Two-port parameters.

    Prerequisites: EECE 2213  with a grade of “C” or higher, PH 2414  
    Corequisite: EECE 2221 Circuits Lab  
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: PH 2424  
    Lecture, 3 hours
  
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    EECE 2421 - Digital Hardware Lab (1) SP


    Hands-on FPGA hardware implementation and software simulation of basic logic building blocks, mathematic circuits combined into an ALU, memory, and state machine design. Labs using MIPS instruction set architecture/assembly language. Basic operations, sorting algorithms using branch/jump instructions, function calls, stack utilization, and I/O operations.

    Prerequisite: EN 3143  
    Corequisite: EECE 2423 Principles of Computer System Design   
    Laboratory, 3 hours
  
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    EECE 2423 - Principles of Computer System Design (3) SP


    An introduction to the principles of computer system design from simple von Neumann and Turing machines to a MIPS processor. Digital number systems, hardware for mathematic operations leading to ALU design, bus design and implementation, memory and register design. Instruction set architecture and assignments in MIPS assembly language. Computer memory stack structure and I/O. Simulation and FPGA implementation of combinational logic, math circuits, and state machines using VHDL. Modular augmentation of a simple 8-bit processor using hardware components from course.

    Prerequisite: EECE 1423  with a grade of “C” or higher and CS 1213  
    Corequisite: EECE 2421 Digital Hardware Lab   
    Lecture, 3 hours
    Satisfies EECE 3813  
  
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    EECE 3234 - Semiconductor Electronics I (4) F


    A study of mathematical modeling of the p-n junction; diode circuit analysis; rectifier design; mathematical modeling of the bipolar junction transistor (BJT) and the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET); quiescent and small signal analysis of BJT and MOSFET amplifiers; basic NMOS and CMOS digital circuit blocks, including flip-flops and SRAM/ DRAM memory; A/D conversion techniques.

    Prerequisites: EECE 2223 Circuits II   with a grade of “C” or higher, EECE 2221 Circuits Lab  with a grade of “C” or higher, EN 3143  
    Lecture, 3 hours;
    Laboratory, 3 hours.
  
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    EECE 3403 - Electromagnetic Fields (3) F


    A study of electric and magnetic fields and their interactions with conductors and dielectric media and Maxwell’s equations.

    Prerequisite: PH 2424  , MA 2324  
    Lecture, 3 hours.
    Same as PH 3403 .
  
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    EECE 3624 - Microprocessors: Principles and Applications (4) F


    The theory and application of microprocessors, including architecture, hardware considerations and programming methods in both assembly- and higher-level languages. Theory and practice of analog-to-digital conversion, synchronous and asynchronous communications, timing, and real-time interrupts. In the laboratory students design, build and test electronic systems involving state-of-the-art microprocessors, sensors and output devices.

    Prerequisite: EECE 2423 Principles of Computer System Design  with a grade of “C” or higher, EN 3143  
    Lecture, 3 hours;
    Laboratory, 3 hours
    Satisfies EECE 4254 Microprocessors  
  
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    EECE 3713 - Introduction to Power System Analysis (3) F Offered on demand


    A study of basic power concepts, per unit quantities, transformers, synchronous machines and power control. Also includes transmission line impedances, current and voltage relationships, one line system diagrams, symmetrical components, symmetrical and unsymmetrical fault current calculations, circuit breakers and system protection.

    Prerequisites: EECE 2223 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
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    EECE 3833 - Signals and Systems (3) F


    Time, sequence and frequency domain analysis of linear continuous-time and discrete-time systems. Impulse response and convolution. Laplace, Fourier and Z transform methods. signal energy and power, continuous Fourier series and Fourier transforms

    Prerequisite: MA 3133  
    Lecture, 3 hours
  
  
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    EECE 3843 - Digital Signal Processing (3) SP


    Digital signal processing. Topics will include power spectrum and multi-domain representation of signals, sampling and aliasing, FIR and IIR filter analysis and design, z-transforms, and discrete-, continuous-, and fast-Fourier transforms.

    Prerequisites: EECE 3833 Signals and Systems  with a grade of “C” or higher, CS 1233  
    Corequisite: EECE 3841 Signals Lab  
    Lecture, 3 hours
    Satisfies EECE 4513  
  
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    EECE 4233 - Semiconductor Electronics II (3) SP


    A study of power amplifiers, operational amplifier applications, transistor amplifier frequency response, operational amplifier design, feedback circuit analysis, oscillators and special analog circuits.

    Prerequisite: EECE 3234 Semiconductor Electronics I  with a grade of “C” or higher.
    Lecture, 3 hours
    EECE 3243  
  
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    EECE 4263 - Embedded Systems (3) S


    Special fixed-purpose computing system design is considered using a combination of microprocessors (software) and custom digital logic (hardware). Design trade-offs focus on the selection and use of software versus hardware processors for optimized performance. Includes hardware interfacing, bus protocols, peripheral systems, digital control systems, real-time constraints and networking. Design considerations include cost, performance, power, flexibility and maintainability.

    Prerequisite: EECE 3624 Microprocessors: Principles and Applications   with a grade of “C” or higher.
    Lecture, 2 hours;
    Laboratory, 3 hours.
  
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    EECE 4273 - Embedded Networks (3) Offered on Demand


    Design-based introduction to embedded networking. Issues of data framing, error recovery, multiple-access, flow control, congestion control, routing and end-to-end reliability will be explored and developed. The concepts will be presented using a top-down approach, with an emphasis on the network-, link-, and physical layers of the networking protocol stack necessary to implement networking in an embedded computing environment.

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
    Recommended: EECE 3624 Microprocessors: Principles and Applications  and EECE 4263 Embedded Systems  
  
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    EECE 4523 - Mechatronic Systems (3) SP


    An interdisciplinary course that provides both electrical and computer engineering students as well as mechanical engineering students with the necessary knowledge to apply the use of sensors, actuators, electrical equipment and microprocessors to the design and building of intelligent mechatronic systems.

    Prerequisites: ENGR 3513  for electrical engineering track or EECE 4263  for computer engineering track.
    Lecture, 2 hours;
    Laboratory, 3 hours.
  
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    EECE 4823 - Digital Processor Design (3) F


    Provides an in-depth digital circuit design experience. Datapath and control path design concepts and practice, modeling and simulation techniques, and circuit synthesis are covered. Design analysis, verification, testing and cost issues. Single-cycle, multi-cycle and pipelined microprocessor architectures are modeled and implemented using hardware description languages and contemporary CAD tools. The course culminates in a cache-based microprocessor design project using VHDL.

    Prerequisites: EECE 2423  with a grade of “C” or higher.
    Lecture, 2 hours;
    Laboratory, 3 hours
  
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    EECE 4833 - Communication Systems (3) Offered on Demand


    The theory and design of analog and digital communications systems. Signal classification, correlation, representation, analysis and transmission methods are investigated, as are amplitude and frequency modulation, signal encoding/decoding, encryption and error detection/correction.

    Prerequisites: EECE 2423 Principles of Computer System Design  and EECE 3833 Signals and Systems  
    Lecture, 3 hours
  
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    EECE 4843 - Image Processing (3) Offered on Demand


    Digital signal processing in two spatial dimensions. Image formation and statistics, image enhancement and feature detection, 2D FFT’s. Other topics include point processing, color correction and human color perception, noise reduction, HDR imaging, and image compression. 

    Prerequisite: CS 1233  
    Lecture, 3 hours
    Recommended: EECE 3833 Signals and Systems  and/or EECE 3843 Digital Signal Processing  

Special Topics/Independent Research in Electrical and Computer Engineering Courses

  
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    EECE 395V - Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering (1, 2, 3, 4, or 5) Offered on demand


    Topics from electrical/computer engineering in either lecture or laboratory oriented format, depending on the specific topic selected. Course may be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
    Course may be repeated for credit.

English Courses

  
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    EN 0110 - Developmental Seminar


    The basic introduction to university-level reading, writing and critical thinking: required during the first semester at Lipscomb for first year students who score below 20 on the written portion of the ACT or below 480 on the written portion of the SAT in English. Developmental Seminar is intended to help students develop the university-level competencies in reading and writing that are prerequisite to the standard composition sequence. To that end, this course provides an intensive review of English grammar, mechanics and usage; an introduction to critical thinking; and frequent practice in written composition, including expository essays. This is a developmental, non-credit course. Students must pass this course with a grade of “C” or better before enrolling in EN 1113  or LU 1203 .

  
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    EN 0110 - Developmental Seminar (3 non-credit hours) F, SP


    Required for students who score below 20 on the written portion of the ACT or below 480 on the written portion of the SAT in English. Developmental Seminar is intended to help students develop the university-level competencies in reading and writing that are prerequisite to the standard composition sequence. To that end, this course provides an intensive review of English grammar, mechanics and usage; an introduction to critical thinking; and frequent practice in written composition, including expository essays. Students must pass this course with a grade of “C” or better before enrolling in EN 1113  or LU 1203 .

  
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    EN 1113 - Introduction to University Writing (3) F, SP


    A first-year composition course that focuses on recognizing and responding to different rhetorical situations and developing effective writing processes.  Students will learn rhetorical analysis and practices, the effective use of readings and source materials, and techniques for generating, revising, and editing texts produced to meet specific situations. Students will produce three to four projects totaling 3000 words. The course will emphasize successive stages of the writing process, including prewriting, drafting, and revision, and will provide feedback from classmates and the instructor. Students must complete EN 1113 with a grade of “C” or above before enrolling in EN 1313 .

    Score of 1 or 2 on English writing placement exam.
  
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    EN 1313 - University Writing (3) F, SP, SU


    A first-year composition course that develops students’ ability to read and think critically, to employ discussion and writing as a means of exploring and refining ideas, and to express those ideas in effective prose. The course is designed to help students develop transferable skills of analysis and argumentation, applicable to a variety of disciplines. Students will produce at least four projects totaling 4000 words of formal writing. At least one of the essays must be an evidence-based argumentative essay. The course will emphasize successive stages of the writing process, including prewriting, drafting, and revision, and will provide feedback from classmates and the instructor. This course meets the standards for Foundations general education credit.

    Score of 3 or higher on English writing placement test. Students who take EN 1113  must receive a C or above as a prerequisite for EN 1313.
  
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    EN 2113 - Survey of English Literature I (3) F


    A study of English literature from the beginnings through the Restoration and the 18th Century with an emphasis on literary history.

    Prerequisite: EN 1313 .
  
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    EN 2123 - Survey of English Literature II (3) SP


    A study of English literature from the Romantic Period to the present with an emphasis on literary history.

    Prerequisite: EN 1313 .
  
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    EN 2133 - Survey of American Literature I (3) F


    A study of American literature from colonial times through the Age of Romanticism with an emphasis on literary history.

    Prerequisite: EN 1313 .
  
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    EN 2143 - Survey of American Literature II (3) SP


    A study of American literature from the Age of Realism to the present with an emphasis on literary history.

    Prerequisite: EN 1313 .
  
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    EN 2153 - Survey of World Literature I (3) F, SP, SU


    A study of translated masterpieces of classical and European literature that have significantly influenced the development of Western culture, particularly English and American literature. Much attention is given to the classical tradition in Homer, Virgil, Dante and classical mythology.

    Prerequisite: EN 1313 .
  
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    EN 2163 - Survey of World Literature II (3) F, SP


    A study of translated masterpieces of world literature since the 17th century that have significantly influenced the development of Western culture, particularly English and American literature.

    Prerequisite: EN 1313 .
  
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    EN 2903 - Introduction to Literary Studies (3) F, SP


    An introduction to the discipline of English as a profession, focusing on the historical development of English studies, the foundational knowledge and skills expected of English majors (including modes of writing in the discipline, and techniques of disciplinary research and methods of interpretation and criticism). Assessment will include the preparation of a professional portfolio. EN 2000 (Orientation to the English Major) must be taken in the same semester. Required of all English majors.

    Prerequisite: EN 1313  
    Corequisite: EN 3013  EN 2000  
  
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    EN 2913 - Introduction to Creative Writing 3 F, SP


    An introduction to creative writing, taught in a workshop setting and covering the four genres: creative nonfiction, dramatic writing, fiction, and poetry. Students will practice basic techniques of craft in their own writing and will learn how to constructively critique each other’s work. They will also study the work of established writers. 

    Prerequisite: EN 1313  

  
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    EN 3013 - Advanced Composition and Rhetoric (3) F, SP


    A study of rhetorical strategies used to write about both formal and informal topics. Entails the analysis of prose styles, stresses organization and presentation of information and ideas, the presentation of a case or a formal argument, and adaptation of a stance to fit the particular audience.

    Prerequisite: EN 1313 .
    Corequisite: EN 2903  
    This course may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement.
  
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    EN 3023 - English Grammar and Linguistics (3) SP


    An eclectic introduction to important concepts in linguistics, focusing on structural and transformational grammar. More specifically, this course examines phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic patterns and their transformations; form and function in the several word classes; and the relation of dialects to grammatical and linguistic concepts. Class discussions, assigned readings, and exercises aim at discovery of principles by which we generate and analyze the structures of Standard American English, with special attention to grammatical terminology that is especially useful for teachers and writers.

    Prerequisite: EN 1313  and EN 2903 . Required of English teaching majors.
  
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    EN 3033 - History of the English Language (3) F


    A study of the development of the English language as manifested in changes in its phonology, morphology, grammar and semantics, especially as these can be understood in relation to culture and to some fundamentals of linguistics. Although some attention is given to Indo-European correspondences, the emphasis is on developments from the Old English Period to the present, including American dialects.

    Prerequisites: English 21n3 and EN 3013 .
  
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    EN 3053 - Literature for Young Adults (3) SP


    This course provides experience with and theory of literary works, typically outside the classical/traditional canon, which are suitable for young adults. The course is required for English teaching majors but can be applied to a major or minor in English. The course does not meet the general education requirement of a sophomore literature course.

    Prerequisite: English 21n3.
    On occasion, some sections of this course may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement.
  
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    EN 3143 - Technical Writing (3) SP


    This course provides practice in technical writing and correspondence while examining technical writing principles and style. Students are guided in polishing a technical research project and report from their own academic disciplines. By permission of the instructor.

    Prerequisite: EN 1313 .
    This course may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement.
  
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    EN 3203 - Literary Theory and Criticism (3) SP


    The course attempts to define and illustrate several of the principal approaches taken by critics in interpreting and evaluating literary works. Assignments include readings in influential critical texts from Plato to the present, with particular attention to major terms of criticism.

    Prerequisite: EN 2903  
  
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    EN 3603 - Creative Writing: Fiction (3) F


    An introduction to writing fiction, taught in a workshop setting.  Students will produce their own fictional pieces, constructively critique each other’s work, and study the work of established fiction writers, both classic and contemporary.  Students will also be introduced to the process of entering literary competitions, applying for grants, researching publication opportunities, and submitting work for publication. 

    Prerequisite: EN 2913  
  
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    EN 3613 - Creative Writing: Poetry (3) SP


    An introduction to writing poetry, taught in a workshop setting.  Students will write a diverse range of poems, constructively critique each other’s work, and study the work of established poets.  Students will also be introduced to the process of entering literary competitions, applying for grants, researching publication opportunities, and submitting work for publication.

    Prerequisite: EN 2913  
  
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    EN 3713 - Fiction as Genre (3) F


    An intensive study of the prose fiction genre in English and in English translation, emphasizing formal and critical analysis. Students will read novels and short stories by a range of established writers, both classics and contemporary; they may also be required to attend public readings, both on and off campus.

    Prerequisites: EN 2903  and EN 3013 .
  
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    EN 3723 - Poetry as Genre (3) SP


    An intensive introduction to poetry in English, especially the lyric, emphasizing formal and critical analysis. Students will read a wide range of poems by established poets, both classic and contemporary; they may also be required to attend public readings, both on and off campus.

    Prerequisites: EN 2903  and EN 3013 .
  
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    EN 3733 - Shakespeare (3) F, SP


    An in-depth study of William Shakespeare as a major literary figure. Students will study Shakespeare’s plays and poetry as well as his historical context and cultural significance. Required for all English majors.

    Prerequisite: EN 2113 , EN 2123 , EN 2133 , EN 2143 , EN 2153 , or EN 2163  
  
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    EN 4053 - Methods of Teaching English (3) F


    Through study and observation, this course provides the prospective teacher with information about and opportunities for research into methods of teaching literature, grammar and composition in the secondary classroom. Practice in making lesson plans is provided. Students are encouraged, though not required, to take EN 3053 : Literature for Young Adults before enrolling in this course. If possible, this course should be taken the semester immediately before student teaching.

    Prerequisite: admission to English teaching program (see requirements under “English Teaching Major.”)
    This course may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement.
  
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    EN 4263 - Creative Writing: Advanced Poetry (3)


    An advanced creative workshop for students interested in continued study in the craft and techniques of poetry writing. Students will practice poetic techniques at an advanced level, write poetry in a variety of poetic forms, explore the professional aspects of publication, and read and critique the work of their classmates.

    Prerequisite: EN 2913  and EN 3613  
  
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    EN 4273 - Creative Writing: Advanced Fiction (3)


    An advanced creative workshop for students interested in continued study in the craft and techniques of fiction writing. Students will practice narrative techniques at an advanced level, learn the fundamentals of novel writing, explore the professional aspects of publication, and read and critique the work of their classmates.

    Prerequisite: EN 2913   and EN 3603  
  
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    EN 4513 - Honors English (3) Offered on demand


    A seminar course designed for English majors who have maintained a superior record. Emphasis is placed upon individual research. A long research essay is required.

    Prerequisites: see academic chair.
  
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    EN 4623 - Creative Writing: Advanced Poetry (3)


    An advanced creative workshop for students interested in continued study in the craft and techniques of poetry writing. Students will practice poetic techniques at an advanced level, write poetry in a variety of poetic forms, explore the professional aspects of publication, and read and critique the work of their classmates.

    Prerequisite: EN 2913  ; EN 3613  
  
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    EN 4992 - Senior English Capstone (2) F, SP


    An advanced seminar designed to help students polish their disciplinary skills as researchers, writers, readers, and presenters on topics selected by the instructor. Students in this course must submit their English Major Portfolio and earn a score of 5 or better to receive credit for this course. Required of all English majors; must be taken during the student’s last regular semester of course work.

    Prerequisite or Corequisite: EN 46n3 , EN 47n3 ,or EN 48n3  

Engineering Courses

  
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    ENGR 0110 - Professional Development and Networking (0) F, SP


    This course provides opportunities for students to participate in professional societies and off-campus professional development as well as networking opportunities. All full-time engineering students in the Raymond B. Jones College of Engineering are required to be enrolled in EN 0110  every semester.

    Lecture/lab, 1 hour.
  
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    ENGR 1113 - Introduction to Engineering (3) F


    An introduction to the profession and practice of engineering. The lecture portion presents the history, role, disciplines and functions of engineering ethics and life-long learning. A series of studio/laboratory experiences exposes students to the three major disciplines in engineering-Civil, Electric/Computer, and Mechanical-combining elements of active learning, laboratory experience and lecture.

    Corequisite: MA 1123 .
    Combined lecture, 1 hour
    Studio/Laboratory two 2-hour labs.
  
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    ENGR 3122 - Appropriate Technology in Engineering Missions (2) SP


    The purpose of this course is to prepare students biblically, culturally and with engineering skills to effectively use appropriate technologies to serve those in developing countries in a Christian mission situation and to develop in each student the vision for living a missional lifestyle as Christian engineers. The student commits to being involved in at least one engineering mission trip.

    Prerequisites: PH 1013 , PH 1224  or PH 2424  and CM 1013 , CM 1113  or CM 1144 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
    This course may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement.
  
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    ENGR 3303 - Applied Mathematics (3) F


    Additional topics in mathematical concepts, intended to provide skills in practical applications specific to all engineering disciplines. Includes concepts and applications of linear algebra and statistics in engineering context

    Prerequisites: MA 3133 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
    College
    Raymond B Jones College of Engineering
  
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    ENGR 3513 - Introduction to Control Systems (3) F


    Classical feedback control systems for continuous time systems. Block diagrams and performance and stability criteria. Root locus, frequency methods and state space approach.

    Prerequisites: EECE 2013  or EECE 2214 ; ME 2013  or ME 2123 ; MA 3133 .
    Lecture, 3 hours.
 

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