May 19, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

History Courses

  
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    HI 3263 - Recent American Issues (1941-present) (3) SP


    A study of major issues beginning with World War II to the present.

    Prerequisite: HI 2223  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    HI 3313 - Historical Geography of the United States (3) SP


    A study of the geography of the United States from discovery and settlement, giving attention to the spread of population and the problems faced until the 1890s. Course is normally offered in alternate years. See academic chair for details.

  
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    HI 3323 - Cultural Geography (3) F


    An examination of the main regions of global geography with an emphasis on area studies and human-to-land relationships.

  
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    HI 4013 - Religion and American Culture (3) F, SP


    An overview American religious thought and practice from the Colonial era to the present. Course is normally offered in alternate years. See academic chair for details.

  
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    HI 4023 - History of Tennessee (3) SP


    The study of Tennessee emphasizing the political, cultural, social and religious developments. Course is normally offered in alternate years. See academic chair for details.

  
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    HI 4033 - Public History (3) F


    A course that focuses on non-teaching vocations and professionals which use historical skills outside of the classroom, including museums, archives, preservation, etc. Course is normally offered in alternate years. See academic chair for details.

    This course may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement.
  
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    HI 4053 - History and Politics of the Middle East (3) SP


    An historical survey of Middle Eastern civilizations and an analysis of their political systems. Course is normally offered in alternate years. See academic chair for details.

  
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    HI 4103 - Latin America (3) SP


    An overview of Latin America with emphasis on the political, social and economic conditions. Course is normally offered in alternate years. See academic chair for details.

  
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    HI 4113 - England Before the 17th Century (3) SP


    A study of the English history from earliest times to the death of Elizabeth I. Course is normally offered in alternate years. See academic chair for details.

  
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    HI 4123 - England Since the 17th Century (3) SP


    The political, social and cultural development of England since 1600. Course is normally offered in alternate years. See academic chair for details.

  
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    HI 4133 - History and Politics of Russia (3) F


    A study of 19th and 20th century Russia with special emphasis on the Russian Revolution. Course is normally offered in alternate years. See academic chair for details.

  
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    HI 4143 - Modern China and the Far East (3) Offered on demand


    A survey of the political, religious, intellectual and cultural developments of modern China, Japan, Korea and Southeast Asia.

  
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    HI 4153 - Urban History and Politics (3) SP


    A historical and political overview of the city in American history. See also PO 3113 . Course is normally offered in alternate years. See academic chair for details.

  
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    HI 4163 - The South in American History (3) Offered on demand


    A course that stresses ideas and attitudes that make the South a distinct region.

  
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    HI 4173 - The American Civil Rights Movement (3) F


    A survey of America’s Civil Rights history with special attention to Nashville’s role in the movement. Course is normally offered in alternate years. See academic chair for details.

  
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    HI 4193 - U.S. Military History (3) SP


    A survey of military history that focuses on American wars, military leadership, politics and the evolution of U.S. military doctrine. Course is normally offered in alternate years. See academic chair for details.

    Prerequisite: HI 2213  and HI 2223  or permission of instructor.
  
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    HI 4203 - History and Politics of Prisons and Punishment (3)


    This course will explore both the historical development of prisons, and the ongoing economic, sociological, and theological consequences of the prison industrial complex.

  
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    HI 4213 - History and Politics of Reconciliation (3)


    How do societies reconcile an offense: easy reconciliation may merely appease and encourage future crimes and injustices, yet Christians are called to be ministers of reconciliation. Utilizing international case studies (e.g., South Africa, Rwanda, Northern Ireland, the Middle East and the U.S.) this course assesses several historical policies and practices of reconciliation.

  
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    HI 4803 - History Travel (3) SU


    A group travel course with an instructor from Lipscomb. There are reading and writing requirements associated with the course.

  
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    HI 4993 - Senior Seminar (3) SP, SU


    This capstone course is required of all history and American studies majors. It is a rigorous research and writing course that will result in a senior thesis on a historical topic.

    Prerequisite: HI 3013 .

Special Topics/Independent Research in History Courses

  
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    HI 400V - Internship in Public History (1-12) F, SP


    Application process begins the semester before internship is to begin.

  
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    HI 490V - Selected Topics (1,2, 3) Offered on demand


    A diversity of topics will be made available to the student. Topics will be announced in the semester schedule. Courses offered the past include World War II, Nashville Scenes, Byzantine History, History of Germany, History of France and Lost Civilizations.


Health Courses

  
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    HL 1303 - Healthful Living (3) F, SP


    An examination and application of the facts and principles of the science of health and nutrition as they pertain to personal, family and community welfare.

  
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    HL 3302 - First Aid and Emergency Care (2) F, SP


    A course designed to provide the student with knowledge and skills to meet the needs of most situations requiring emergency first aid care, with emphasis on personal safety and accident prevention. Basic Life Support (BLS) and Standard First Aid courses completion certificate will be given.

  
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    HL 4342 - Methods of Teaching Health (2) SP Offered even-numbered years


    A course consisting of history, philosophy, current trends, basic issues and principles underlying health education. On the basis of these principles, a critical appraisal is made of the health curriculum at the various grade levels, health teaching methods and units for teaching in health.


Honors Courses

  
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    HN 1113 - Communication, Technology and Society (3)


    This course will examine the influence of new communication technologies and medical technologies on experience of human communication. In addition to covering some basic communication theory at the outset of the course, we will examine how cell phones, computers, Skype, social networking, PowerPoint, etc., have altered the landscape of interpersonal relationships, political campaigns and public speaking. We will explore how the newest developments in biomedical technologies, such as fMRI, influence the ways in which we understand and detect human intention in communication. Finally, we will discuss the ethical implications of the brave new world of communication technology. Students will make several presentations during the class so that they practice the skills necessary to advance in their majors and careers.

    This course meets the general education requirement for CO 1003 , Introduction to Communication.
  
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    HN 2103 - Honors Integrated Literature (3)


    Students will explore literature and another discipline around a particular topic. The instructors will select a topic and appropriate literature and other materials from different time periods and from Western and non-Western traditions. In addition to reading the literature, students will read at least one non-fiction work addressing the topic under consideration. Topics for the class will be suggested by students at the end of each semester, by the professor and/or by The Honors College Council.

    This course satisfies the LULT Integrated Literature general education requirement.
  
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    HN 3111 - Preparing the Senior Project (1)


    Preparing the Senior Project is required of all students finishing as Honors College Scholars. Two semesters before students plan to graduate, they must enroll in this course designed to aid them in developing and defending a proposal for a SALT III project or for a research-based thesis. Students will develop a bibliography, select an advisory committee and submit a written proposal for the project.

  
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    HN 3413 - Solving Complex Social Problems (3)


    The class will focus on one social problem, say population and sustainability, and explore it from economic, political, scientific and moral/theological perspectives. The course will be managed by one faculty member from one of these disciplines who will invite colleagues in for a week to discuss the particular perspective in which he/she has a specialty. Students will have in-class discussions about the problem from each perspective and about approaches which might address significant aspects of the problem. Students will also select a social problem which they wish to explore from these perspectives.

    This course satisfies the Engagements general education requirement.
  
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    HN 4003 - Senior Project (3)


    The Senior Project is required of all students finishing as Honors College Scholars. The project must be of sufficient scope to warrant three hours credit. As part of the requirements for this course, the student will defend the thesis before his/her committee at the end of the semester. A student may apply for an extension should he/she fail to complete the thesis during the semester of registration for this course. Once the thesis is approved, it will be copied, bound and catalogued in the library. In addition, The Honors College will retain a copy of the thesis and the student and his/her adviser will receive a copy.


Humanities Courses

  
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    HU 2003 - World Humanities I (3, 3) Offered only in semester-long


    Global Learning program These humanities courses use a multidisciplinary approach to understanding the human condition, exploring key periods, perspectives and issues central to the Global Learning site where they are offered. Insights from disciplines such as history, art, communications, politics and business shed light on the many factors that define a culture and on the interrelationships of these factors. The instructor will make extensive use of local culture and resources to facilitate experiential learning and the cultivation of an informed personal world view. Either course may substitute for integrated history LUHI 2xn3 .

  
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    HU 2013 - World Humanities II (3, 3) Offered only in semester-long


    This introduction to university-level critical thinking and cultural engagement is required during the first semester at Lipscomb for all first-year students. Discussion-oriented, the Lipscomb Experience introduces students to the intellectual endeavor of liberal arts education from a Christian perspective in small group settings designed to develop mentoring relationships, to provoke important questions, and to facilitate thoughtful discussion. While Lipscomb Experience courses engage unique topics examined from multiple perspectives, each course also introduces students to a common set of transferrable skills. The course facilitates student engagement with fellow students, the university, and the local and global community; essential college-level research and information literacy skills; and the habits of rigorous study, intellectual growth, and lifelong learning. Students may not withdraw from the course unless they are withdrawing from the university. This course is a LiGHT-designated course and may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement. Instructors may assign a grade of “NC” (no credit) to diligent student who nevertheless fail to earn a “C.” However, instructors reserve the right to assign an “F” when, in their opinion, students do not demonstrate satisfactory effort. Students who do not earn a “C” in LU 1203 must retake the course the subsequent spring semester. No AP, CLEP, or “Dual Enrollment” credit is accepted for this course.

    Either course may substitute for integrated history LUHI 2xn3 .


Igniting the Dream of Education and Access at Lipscomb Courses

  
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    IDEA 1003 - Employment Skills for IDEAL I (3) F


    This course will cover key skills in the areas of transitioning to college, living a healthy lifestyle, maintaining personal hygiene and developing self determination skills. Students will learn how to communicate with their professors and classmates and how to set goals for themselves for their college experience. They will also learn how to manage their student account and to make healthy food choices on campus.

  
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    IDEA 1013 - Technology Skills for IDEAL I (3) F


    This course will cover communication via technology (i.e., email, texting) and basic programs (i.e., Microsoft products, online banking). Students will learn the basics of these aspects of technology and practice using them to complete a variety of projects.

  
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    IDEA 1023 - Employment Skills for IDEAL II (3) F, SP


    This course will cover basic independent living skills that students need in order to be successful in college (i.e., note-taking , self-determination and interpersonal skills) as well as in their future careers (appropriate behavior toward supervisors and coworkers and work stamina). Students will acquire skills through a variety of instructional methods and will practice using them to complete a number of projects.

  
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    IDEA 1033 - Technology Skills for IDEAL II (3) F, SP


    This course will cover communication via technology (i.e., social media), basic programs (i.e., Microsoft products, internet usage), and career tools (i.e., resume building). Students will learn the basics of these aspects of technology and practice using them to complete a variety of projects.

  
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    IDEA 1043 - Employment Skills for IDEAL III


    This course will cover basic independent living skills that students need in order to be successful as an independent adult (i.e. healthy lifestyle skills, public transportation training and self-advocacy development) as well as in their future careers (i.e. increasing work speed and producing work outputs that meet supervisor expectations). Students will acquire skills through a variety of instructional methods and will practice using them to complete a number of projects.

    IDEA 1023  
  
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    IDEA 1053 - Technology Skills for IDEAL III


    This course will cover communication via technology (i.e. business letters and emails), basic programs (i.e. Microsoft PowerPoint), and career tools (i.e. online job postings and applications).

    Students will learn the basics of these aspects of technology and practice using them to complete a variety of projects

    IDEA 1033  

  
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    IDEA 1063 - Employment Skills for IDEAL IV


    This course will cover basic independent living skills that students need in order to be successful as an independent adult (i.e. food preparation and safety, anticipating consequences, understanding the housing market) as well as in their future careers (i.e. developing initiative to suggest possible tasks, learning to work without supervision). Students will acquire skills through a variety of instructional methods and will practice using them to complete a number of projects.

    IDEA 1043  
  
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    IDEA 1073 - Technology Skills for IDEAL IV


    This course will cover communication via technology (i.e. methods of saving and transferring data), basic programs (i.e. Microsoft Excel) and career tools (i.e. building an online portfolio).

    Students will learn the basics of these aspects of technology and practice using them to complete a variety of projects

    IDEA 1053  

  
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    IDEA 2006 - IDEAL Vocational Practicum (6) F, SP


    This course serves to provide collaborative and practical strategies for the development of appropriate employment skills. Attention is given to brainstorming and problem-solving common workplace problems and interpersonal challenges between employees, co-workers, and supervisors. This course includes a long-term field experience in which students will receive job training and be placed in a work site up to 20 hours a week. 


Elective Internship Courses

  
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    INTR 100V - Elective Internship (1-6) F, SP, SU


    The elective internship provides an opportunity for students to focus on career exploration and professional development without gaining credit in any particular department or academic discipline. Interns obtain academic credit for practical experience in the workplace while reflecting on professional development during the semester. 195 contact hours plus internship documentation are required for three hours of university credit. Attendance at a mandatory internship orientation will provide the intern with a description of all assignments and requirements for the course. Upon attendance, the intern will be provided an override that will permit registration in the course. Grades will be determined by the Lipscomb University internship coordinator based on completion of all assignments as well as evaluations from the on-site supervisor. Further details may be obtained from the career development center. Students may register for one to six hours of credit during any semester or summer term. A maximum of six hours of elective internship credit may be used toward graduation requirements.

  
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    IUE 390V - ASPIRE Internship Variable F, SP, SU


    The IUE internship provides students with direct experience in one or more functions of a business. The internship activities experienced should significantly match the student’s major. Interns are expected to develop and achieve workplace goals in a firm/professional work setting, create reports/reflection papers and a portfolio of materials that demonstrate the ability to see the application of classroom materials in a workplace setting, use the CoB chosen virtues and values of Jesus to evaluate the presence/absence of those values in the business at present and to recommend how adopting them or more fully implementing them would benefit the firm, and effectively critique the activities of the firm and make logical and useful observations of what the firm is doing well and where it could be doing better in its management activities.

    Repeatable for a maximum of 10 hours. 


Information Security Courses

  
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    SEC 3113 - Fundamentals of Information Security (3) SP


    An introduction to the security of digital information including: threats; regulations; risk management; attack detection and response; cryptography; forensics; and technical training and certifications.

    Prerequisites: CS 1213  with a grade of “C” or higher.
  
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    SEC 3313 - Introduction to Policy and Procedures (3) F


    Establishing information security policies and procedures for organizations. Identification of relevant contracts, laws, and regulations constraining organization, and the setting of procedures to be used in day-to-day operations.

    Prerequisite: SEC 3113  with a grade of “C” or higher.
  
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    SEC 3323 - Crytography (3) F


    Security requirements for telecommunication over the Internet and other communication networks, various conventional and public-key encryption protocols, digital encryption standard, RSA and EIGamal cryptographic systems, digital signature algorithm and analysis of its crypto-immunity, and access sharing schemes.

    Prerequisites: MA 2103  and MA 3123  with grades of “C” or higher.
  
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    SEC 3333 - Introduction to Business Continuity and Recovery Planning (3) SP


    Maintenance of information and the processes of how to continue in business in the face of data loss, and planning for the recovery in the event of such loss.

    Prerequisite: SEC 3313  with a grade of “C” or higher.
  
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    SEC 3433 - Cyber Defense Competition (3) F


    A practical application of cyber-defense and penetration testing methodologies in a fully operational corporate network environment. Skills required for cyber defense competition include implementation and evaluation of a network, risk assessment, incident response and management, as well as performing under time limitations in a team format. Students who complete this course will be equipped to participate in the SouthEastern Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition (SECCDC) and similar forums. It is expected that the best students from this course will represent Lipscomb University at the regional SECCDC, and possibly at the National Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition.

    SEC 3113, with a grade of C or better
    College
    College of Computing and TechnologyDepartment
    Information Technologies
  
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    SEC 4053 - Senior Seminar in Information Security (3) SP


    Required of all information security majors in their senior year. Assessment of degree to which information security program outcomes have been achieved; reflection on, and synthesis of, information security academic experience; preparation for transition to professional employment or graduate school.

    Prerequisites: Senior standing in information security and 15 hours of SEC courses.
  
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    SEC 4193 - Ten-Day Travel Course in Information Security (3) Optional


    The travel course is designed to give students insight into various organizations’ operations and how they handle the several aspects of information security. Students will observe the security of the physical plant, how Human Resources protects data by making informed hiring decisions, how data is secured as well as networks and communications. Note: This course is offered during Wintermester and is offered on demand at additional cost.

    Note: This course is offered during Wintermester and is offered on demand at additional cost.
    Prerequisites: Senior standing in information security and 15 hours of SEC courses. Travel, 3 hours.
  
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    SEC 4313 - Database Security (3) F


    Security challenges and threats in database systems and state-of-the-art security technologies, including multilevel security, covert channels, and security measures for relational and object-oriented database systems. In addition to the security issues, the courses addresses issues related to distributed databases and current technologies, such as service oriented architecture, cloud computing, etc.

    Prerequisites: CS 2243  and SEC 3113 , SEC 3323  with grades of “C” or higher.
  
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    SEC 4323 - Network Security (3) SP


    Advanced knowledge of network security. Topics include design and implementation of some important public key systems: RSA and Elliptic Curve algorithms; concepts of quantum cryptography; quantum computing and cryptography; wireless computing and cryptography; design, implementation and configuration of firewalls in depth; design, implementation and configuration of intrusion detection systems; prevention systems; advanced network security architectures; advanced wireless security; principles and practices; security in trusted-based computing environments; and quantum cryptography.

    Prerequisite: IT 3323  and SEC 3323  with grades of “C” or higher.

Special Topics/Independent Research in Information Security Courses

  
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    SEC 350V - Special Topics in Information Security (1-3) Offered on demand


    Selected topics from the field of information security. The course may be either lecture or laboratory oriented depending upon the topic selected. The study represents an in-depth approach to specific areas of interest to the students.

    Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.
    Repeatable for credit with director’s approval.

Information Technology Courses

  
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    IT 1123 - Future of Computing (3) F, SP


    Cutting-edge trends in computing. Introduction to programming using a scripting language. Societal and ethical use of computers.

    Lecture, 3 hours.
    Computer upgrade fee: $90.
  
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    IT 1213 - Graphic Design Studio (3) F, SP


    Basics of graphic design using appropriate applications of photo editing, drawing, and layout.

     

     

    Lecture, laboratory, 3 hours.

  
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    IT 2043 - Information Technology Applications (3) F, SP


    Emphasis on using the computer as a decision-making tool. Theory and applications of various software packages, including word processing, electronic spreadsheets, databases and presentation software.

    Prerequisites: None.
    Lecture/laboratory, 3 hours.
  
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    IT 2223 - Web Application Development I (3) F, SU


    Survey of Web development techniques. Emphasis on developing and maintaining websites with topics including basic Web site design, HTML, XHTML, and CSS coding. Use of content management systems (CMS) and integrated development environments (IDEs) for a seamless web development process.

    Prerequisites: None.
    This course may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement.
  
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    IT 2233 - User Interface Design (3) SP


    Provides an introduction to human-computer interface design and evaluation with an emphasis on graphical user interfaces for software products. Covers design principles and theory, web usability and selected basic research in the areas of human factors and human cognition.

    Prerequisite: IT 2223  with a grade of “C” or higher.
  
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    IT 3121 - Fundamentals of Database Concepts and Data Analytics (1) SU


    Leveling course for graduate students with no prior background in database systems. Model organization data and business rules, logical and physical design of relational databases, data warehousing, data mining, and data administration.

    Prerequisite: Application to a master’s program in the School of Computing and Informatics.
  
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    IT 3131 - Fundamentals of Data Communications and Network Management (1) SU


    Leveling course for graduate students with no prior background in database systems. Concepts and terminology of data communications, network design, client/server architecture, distributed information systems with focus on communications architecture and management.

    Prerequisite: Application to a master’s program in the School of Computing and Informatics.
  
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    IT 3223 - Web Application Development II (3) SP


    Advanced skills in Web application development. Topics include use of HTML5, CSS3, Javascript, jQuery, frameworks, ajax, actionscript, etc with introduction to MVC. Emphasis on using available technologies to produce a variety of website types with appreciable user interfaces.

    Prerequisite:    IT 2223   and CS 1213   with grades of “C” or higher.

     
    IT 2233 and CS 1213

  
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    IT 3233 - Web Server Technologies (3) F


    Application design using server technologies to transfer data from websites to and from databases. Topics include: scripting languages such as ASP, PHP, data structuring languages such as XML and other server technologies.

    Prerequisites: IT 3223  and IT 3313  and CS 2243   with grades of “C” or higher.

     

  
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    IT 3243 - Principles of Web Engineering (3) F


    Web Engineering proposes an agile yet disciplined framework for building industry/quality web applications. This course surveys the latest techniques and tools used in the analysis, design, implementation, and testing to ensure quality web applications throughout the web development lifecycle.

  
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    IT 3243 - Principles of Web Engineering 3 Fall


    Survey of the latest techniques and tools used in the analysis, design, implementation, and testing to ensure quality Web applications throughout the Web development lifecycle.

  
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    IT 3313 - Network Principles (3) F, SP


    Overview of current computer network theory and practice. Hardware requirements, network media and topologies, protocols and access methods, the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) and internet models.

    Prerequisites: CS 1213  with a grade of “C” or higher.
  
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    IT 3323 - Wireless Networks and Mobile Systems (3) F


    Introduction to wireless networks and link protocols, mobile networking including support for the Internet Protocol suite, mobile middleware, and mobile applications.

    Prerequisite: IT 3313  with a grade of “C” or higher.
  
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    IT 3333 - Network Administration (3) F


    Administration of peer-to-peer and client/server networks. Hands-on experience with commercial client and server software. Topics include pre-installation planning, network installation, network software architecture, server configuration, client configuration, profiles and logon scripts, user account management, policies, resource sharing and security, disk management, remote access, backup and recovery, performance monitoring and network optimization.

    Prerequisite: IT 3313  with a grade of “C” or higher.
  
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    IT 3343 - Database Administration (3) SP


    Database (e.g. Oracle) creation, including table spaces, user accounts, views, indexes, and other objects necessary to support an application. Understanding the internal structures and organization of database systems (e.g. Oracle). Account maintenance, data import and export, system backup, and performance tuning and monitoring.

    Prerequisite: CS 2243  with a grade of “C” or higher.
  
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    IT 3413 - Systems Analysis and Design (3) F


    Introduction to analysis and design techniques, project management tools, data collection tools and system documentation tools. Communication skills are emphasized. Proper input/output design techniques, database, etc. are included in selection of appropriate implementation. Evaluation of hardware/software options relating to feasibility.

    Prerequisite: CS 2243  with a grade of “C” or higher.
  
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    IT 3423 - Project Management (3) SP


    Design and implementation of realistic information system projects while working in a team environment.

    Prerequisite: IT 3413  or SENG 3223  with grades of “C” or higher.
  
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    IT 4053 - Senior Seminar in Web Development (3) SP


    Required of all web application development majors in their senior year. Assessment of degree to which web application development program outcomes have been achieved; reflection on, and synthesis of, web application development academic experience; ethical- professional-creative expectations for the practicing web developer; preparation for transition to professional practice.

    Prerequisites: Senior standing in web application development and 30 hours of IT courses.
  
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    IT 4223 - Current Trends in Web Application Development (3) S


    Study of current Web development frameworks and trends. Students will choose three technologies for exploratory study, of either front-end or back-end, and use current technologies and/or work flow tools to develop a functional project. The main aim is to present unique or experimental applications laying out new directions of development - both in terms of application (combining the existing methods in a novel way) and building new concepts.

    Prerequisite: IT 3233  with a grade of “C” or higher.

  
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    IT 4323 - Modern Telecommunications (3) SP


    Comprehensive overview, including current status and future directions. Topics include review of evolution of telecommunications; voice and data services; basics of signaling, digital transmission, network architecture, and protocols; local area, metropolitan, and wide area networks and narrow band ISDN; asynchronous transfer mode and broadband ISDN; and satellite systems, optical communications, cellular radio, personal communication systems, and multimedia services. Provides examples of real-life networks to illustrate basic concepts and gain further insight.

    Prerequisite: IT 3323  with a grade of “C” or higher.
  
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    IT 4423 - Management of Information Technology (3) F


    The role of information technology in organizations and their strategic use for providing competitive advantage through the use of real-world case studies. Use of critical thinking skills to explore methods of using information systems to increase market share in organizational settings.

    Prerequisites: Junior standing and IT 3413  with a grade of “C” or higher.

Special Topics/Independent Research in Information Technology Courses

  
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    IT 350V - Special Topics in Information Technology (1-3) Offered on demand


    Selected topics from the field of information technology. The course may be either lecture or laboratory oriented depending upon the topic selected. The study represents an in-depth approach to specific areas of interest to the students.

    Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.
    Repeatable for credit with director’s approval.

Information Technology Management Courses

  
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    ITM 4003 - Principles of Technology Management (3) SP


    This course covers the role of technology within the organization and how it can be used to make operations more efficient, save time and energy. In addition, the methods to use technology strategically are evaluated. The use of critical thinking skills to explore methods of using technology to increase productivity and, if necessary, as the competitive advantage will be a large component of this course.

    Prerequisites: Junior standing and IT 3413  with a grade of “C” or higher.
  
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    ITM 4013 - Telecommunications Network Management (3) F


    In-depth study of telecommunications network management technology systems. Architecture, functions, methods and protocols necessary to design modern telecommunications network management systems. Network management standards such as Telecommunications Management Network (TMN) and Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP). Basic network management concepts, protocols and methods with real-world examples used to address these. Management aspects of planning and controlling/decision making for telecommunication networks: human resources, financial planning and control, marketing, cost/benefit analysis. Marketing aspects of telecommunications networks.

    Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of undergraduate programs director.
  
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    ITM 4023 - Data & Knowledge Management (3) SP


    This course includes a focus on the process of data and knowledge management and associated business intelligence parameters. Data management: modeling, using, securing and sharing organizational data resources. Business intelligence: applications and technologies for gathering, storing, analyzing and providing access to help enterprise users make better business decisions. Knowledge management: effective deployment of technology, organizational practices and processes to increase an organization’s utilization of its knowledge capital.

    Prerequisites: Junior standing and IT 3413  with a grade of “C” or higher.

Special Topics/Independent Research in Information Technology Management Courses

  
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    ITM 350V - Special Topics in IT Management (1-3) Offered on demand


    Selected topics from the field of IT Management. The course may be either lecture or laboratory oriented depending upon the topic selected. The study represents an in-depth approach to specific areas of interest to the students.

    Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.
    Repeatable for credit with director’s approval.

Law, Justice and Society Courses

  
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    LJS 2103 - Society and the Law (3) F, SP


    This course introduces the central themes for the Law, Justice & Society program. Students gain an understanding of how law relates to society and how legal change relates to broader social change. Students explore the sociological and historical perspective on law and legal change. Focus is given to social and legal theory and to critically analyzing law and legal institutions in relation to equality, justice and fairness. The course blends class discussion, guest speakers, film clips and local field trips.

  
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    LJS 2203 - Introduction to American Law (3) SP


    This course is a basic introduction to the common and statutory law of the U.S. federal and state systems of law. It is designed to develop the students’ understanding of American legal concepts and issues and to broaden understanding of American law and its processes. The course will highlight selected substantive areas in American law. The class will travel to Washington, D.C., to observe and to interact with the judicial, executive and legislative branches of our government.

    A travel fee will be assessed.
  
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    LJS 3103 - Dispute Resolution (3) F


    This course examines the principles and methods of dispute resolution, including negotiation, mediation, conciliation, arbitration and formal adjudication. Students will be able to describe the advantages and disadvantages of different types of dispute resolution. Using case-study methods, students will be able to analyze and to provide resolution for a variety of disputes using numerous techniques.

  
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    LJS 3203 - Legal Research and Reasoning (3) F, SP, SU


    This course teaches students the fundamentals of legal reasoning through a series of research and writing exercises. Students learn how to use available research resources, including computer databases. Emphasis will be given on improving analytical writing about social issues and legal change.

  
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    LJS 3303 - Influencing Change through Civic Engagement (3) F, SP, SU


    This service-learning course allows students to volunteer with a not-for-profit agency, designed to assist with a societal issue such as homelessness, legal aid for the poor, teen pregnancy or domestic violence. Through class discussions and reflective journaling, students will explore how the law facilitates or inhibits significant social change.

    This course may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement.
  
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    LJS 3403 - Conflict Management (3) F


    This course provides an understanding of conflict in the context of the people involved and their relationship to each other. It draws from both the fields of psychology and sociology to provide a framework for understanding and assisting those parties to acute conflict, who often end up in the legal system. Cross-cultural conflict, communication in conflict and the psychology of conflict will be explored. Case studies, simulations and role-playing exercises will be utilized.

  
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    LJS 3413 - International Conflict Management (3) SP


    This course explores key questions and concepts in the study of international negotiations and conflict management. Students will learn how different factors and contexts can influence the negotiation process and its outcome. Students will better understand the complexity of conducting international negotiations and mediations by participating in simulations and studying actual cases involving peace and security issues, trade agreements and access to humanitarian aid.

  
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    LJS 3503 - Ethics and the Laws of Compliance (3) F, SP, SU


    This course applies ethical theories, research and practice to the law and justice system. Students will examine the moral dimensions of corporate law, ethical enforcement systems, issues in compliance and a variety of controversial issues associated with the civil and criminal justice systems applicable to business dealings.

  
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    LJS 3513 - The Social Enterprise (3) F


    This course focuses on utilizing entrepreneurial approaches to address global challenges. Socio-legal students will be challenged to think creatively about potential solutions to public challenges; entrepreneurially inclined students will be challenged to analyze rigorously the economic, social and political context that defines entrepreneurial opportunity. All students will design a social enterprise and devise approaches for assessing its impact. Skills developed in the course will enable students to act as effective leaders of change effected both through new ventures and through existing for-profit, nonprofit and government institutions.

  
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    LJS 4103 - Law in the Global Community (3) SU


    This course explores the tensions between a global economy that deliberately seeks to transcend geographic borders and the law which is historically bound by national jurisdictions. This course will analyze the structures, processes and principles of different kinds of legal systems. An international class trip to observe firsthand another country’s legal system is required.

  
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    LJS 4203 - Senior Research Project (3) F, SP, SU


    This capstone course requires students to complete a senior research project under the direction of a faculty member. The project should build upon the service work done in LJS 3303 , allowing the student to influence society through the law and legal change. Students must demonstrate the ability to design a study, conduct a scholarly literature review, review laws and legal precedents, gather and analyze data, present findings and create a law-based solution to the societal issue. Written research reports will be presented at a Law, Justice and Society Symposium open to government and community leaders.

    This course may satisfy the SALT Tier IV requirement.
  
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    LJS 4303 - Special Topics: [Insert Topic] and the Law (3) F, SP


    This course is designed to respond more quickly to the ever-changing issues in the law, justice and society area. It provides the ability to address current issues and other topics. Examples would include classes such as Immigration and the Law, Children and the Law, Women and the Law.

    This course may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement.
  
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    LJS 4403 - Mediation: Process, Skills and Theory (3) SP


    This course examines the theory, law, and practice related to third party intervention in the resolution of legal disputes. The course explores mediation as a collaborative process of resolving conflict as well as the legislative, ethical and practical constraints on its use. The course equips students with the skills needed to serve in a mediation capacity. There is an emphasis on learning through simulation and role-playing exercises.

  
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    LJS 4413 - Financial Management of the Social Enterprise (3) SP


    This course focuses primarily on the financial management of new social enterprises and established nonprofits, exploring topics such as fundraising, grant writing, revenue generation through the provision of services provided, and capital acquisition. Students, many of whom will not have a background in accounting and finance, will explore the practical business implications gained from financial statements and will learn how to manage the firm’s finances to create the best possibility for long-term success. At the end of the course, they will develop a three year financial plan for a start-up social venture and determine how to garner the resources needed to start the venture.

  
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    LJS 4503 - Evidence and Crime Scene Investigation 3 SP


    This course will help the student fully understand criminal evidence law, the basics of criminal procedure, and the science of criminal investigation.  The course covers forms of evidence, the hearsay rule and its exceptions, examination of witnesses, testimonial privileges, and the concepts of relevancy and materiality.   You will be introduced to the rules of criminal procedure, including the exclusionary rule, searches and seizures, interrogations, and the pretrial identification procedures.  The course will include crime scene investigation methods, including DNA analysis, fingerprint analysis, computer forensics, crash reconstruction, DUI enforcement, terrorism, homicide investigations, crime lab analysis and forensics.


Special Topics/Independent Research in Law, Justice and Society Courses

  
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    LJS 390V - Internship (1-3) F, SP, SU


    This applied learning course allows students to seek a greater understanding of the legal system as an intern in a law-related agency. On-site work hours, written assignments and regular meetings are required. Credit varies according to the number of hours worked during the semester.

    This course may satisfy the SALT Tier III requirement.
  
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    LJS 490V - Independent Study (1-3) Offered upon request


    This course is designed to provide the student with a major or minor from the Institute for Law, Justice and Society the opportunity to pursue independent study or research. Variable credit offered at one, two or three hours according to individual need.

    Prerequisite: permission of program director.

Lipscomb Seminar Courses

  
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    LU 1203 - Lipscomb Experience (3)


    This introduction to university-level critical thinking and cultural engagement is required during the first semester at Lipscomb for all first-year students. Discussion-oriented, the Lipscomb Experience introduces students to the intellectual endeavor of liberal arts education from a Christian perspective in small group settings designed to develop mentoring relationships, to provoke important questions, and to facilitate thoughtful discussion. While Lipscomb Experience courses engage unique topics examined from multiple perspectives, each course also introduces students to a common set of transferrable skills. The course facilitates student engagement with fellow students, the university, and the local and global community; essential college-level research and information literacy skills; and the habits of rigorous study, intellectual growth, and lifelong learning. Students may not withdraw from the course unless they are withdrawing from the university. This course is a LIGHT-designated course and may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement. Instructors may assign a grade of “NC” (no credit) to diligent student who nevertheless fail to earn a “C.” However, instructors reserve the right to assign an “F” when, in their opinion, students do not demonstrate satisfactory effort. Students who do not earn a “C” in LU 1203 must retake the course the subsequent spring semester. No AP, CLEP, or “Dual Enrollment” credit is accepted for this course./


Lipscomb Seminar: Social Science Courses

  
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    LUSS 2093 - Impact of Internet Technologies on Society (3) F, SP


    This course explores Internet technologies such as social media, streaming services, surveillance, crowd sourcing, virtual/augmented reality and global connectedness. The role of governments, corporations, and research & development entities in the spread of Internet technologies is investigated. The social aspect of the Internet is also explored, including analysis of trends in usage, dangers that have been spawned by global use, as well as ethical issues arising from democratic access to world-wide communication.


Management Courses

  
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    ENT 3453 - Principles of Social Entrepreneurship 3 On Demand


    This course will introduce students to the concepts, principles, and practices of social entrepreneurship. Students will study local and global social issues while learning how entrepreneurship and business can play a role in addressing these issues through sustainable solutions.  This class will offer both training in the classroom and hands on experience outside the classroom through the creation of small social enterprises that will be launched in teams and run during the semester by students.

    College
    BusinessDepartment
    Management, Entrepreneurship and Marketing
  
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    MG 3503 - Leading and Managing People (3) F, SP, SU


    People are considered the most important resource in every organization. In this course, students will learn to use their leadership/management skills, knowledge of organizational structures and cultures, and human resource systems to maximize talent at the individual, group, and organizational levels, thus aiding in the accomplishment of organizational success.

    Prerequisite:  Sophomore standing
 

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