Jul 05, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Engineering Courses

  
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    ENGR 3943 - Engineering Economy and Planning 3 SP


    Introduction to engineering economy including cash-flow diagrams, interest rates and time value of money, equivalence, present worth, future worth, rate of return,and benefit cost analysis.  Introduction to project planning including work breakdown structure, cost estimating, activity duration, precedence, resource allocation and leveling, PERT diagrams, Ghantt Charts, and critical path networks.  Students will use computer software including EXCEL and Modern Scheduling tools.

    Junior standing or approval of instructor
    3 hrs
    College
    Raymond B Jones College of Engineering
  
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    ENGR 3980 - Engineering CO-OP (0)


    Co-op work experience with an engineering employer, pre-approved by the College of Engineering. The student is required to make periodic reports during the semester to a designated engineering faculty. Grades will be awarded on a pass/fail basis.

    Prerequisites: Approval by department chair.
  
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    ENGR 4943 - Interdisciplinary Design I (3) F


    This course is intended to exercise the students understanding of project management techniques, including work breakdown structures, scheduling and resource management necessary for the capstone senior design project based on a student-developed proposal to be carried to completion during the interdisciplinary design sequence (ENGR 4943 and ENGR 4953)

    Prerequisite: ENGR 3943 and consent of instructor
    Corequisite: ENGR 0110, ME 4423 or ME 4513 or  EECE 4823 , or Civil and Environmental Engineering 4XX3 (any CEE senior level design course),  
    Lecture/lab/recitation, 3 hrs.
    College
    Raymond B Jones College of Engineering
  
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    ENGR 4953 - Interdisciplinary Design II (3) SP


    The culmination of the engineering experience in a major, realistic design experience based on the knowledge and skills acquired in prior and concurrent course work, and requiring teamwork involving more than one discipline.  As the student team carry out the design to completion, they will generate professional design documentation, including drawings and specifications.

    Prerequisite: ENGR 4943  and consent of instructor.
    ENGR 0110
    Laboratory, 9 hours.
    College
    Raymond B Jones College of Engineering

Special Topics/Independent Research in Engineering Courses

  
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    ENGR 395V - Topics in Engineering (1-5) Offered on demand


    Selected topics from an engineering discipline in either lecture- or laboratory-oriented format, depending on the specific topic selected.

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
    Course may be repeated for credit.
  
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    ENGR 481V - Engineering in the Developing World Practicum (1-3)


    Engineering mission trip project participation. Planning design and construction of engineering systems to meet the needs of people in developing nations. Credit received depends on the degree of involvement and the level of responsibility in the engineering project. This course may be used as a technical elective in engineering curricula if there is a high level of engineering design responsibility and you receive prior approval from your engineering department head.

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Entrepreneurship Courses

  
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    BA 3303 - Principles of Business as Mission 3 F


    This course will introduce students to the concepts, theology, principles, and practices of Business As Mission.  Students will learn to develop a framework, theology, and praxis for how business can be utilized to do good in the world both within the business (internally) and as the business (externally). This applies to both those who will work within a business as an employee and those who desire to lead a business at the executive level.  This course will also expound upon the virtues and values of Jesus set forth by the College of Business as the model for training business leaders.  The course will offer points of discovery for students to discover unique giftedness as it relates to vocation while learning to cast vision from those unique gifts.

  
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    ENT 2503 - An Introduction to Business (3) F, SP


    Introduction to Business is a foundational course that introduces students to business by exploring an entrepreneurial perspective to the pursuit of value-creating opportunities.  This course examines the entrepreneur’s approach including business creation and leadership, innovation and creativity, and the knowledge and skills necessary for these approaches to create value. During the course, students will develop and execute a business model in a team and will understand how that business model can apply to all business endeavors.  Students will also independently develop a business idea of their own. Business will be discussed from a Christian worldview that emphasizes exemplary ethical principles from a personal and organizational perspective.

  
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    ENT 3543 - Entrepreneur Marketing (3) F


    Focuses on introducing new products or services to the marketplace, marketing those products and services in an environment of limited resources, and developing marketing processes for growing firms. Students will be able to craft marketing strategies for all stages of enterprise development and be able to implement those strategies in the most resource efficient manner. At the end of the course, they will develop a marketing plan for a start-up venture that has limited resources.

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and ENT 2503 .
  
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    ENT 4403 - Entrepreneur Finance (3) F


    Focuses on the flow of cash through an entrepreneurial enterprise as the foundation for understanding the basics of accounting and finance. This course explores the sourcing and conservation of the financial resources the firm needs to be successful. Students, many of whom will not have a background in accounting and finance, will explore the practical business implications gained from financial statements and will learn how to manage the firm’s finances to create the best possibility for long-term success. At the end of the course, they will develop a three year financial plan for a start-up venture and determine how to garner the resources needed to start the venture.

    Prerequisite: ENT 2503  or LJS 3513 .
  
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    ENT 4503 - New Venture Creation (3) SP


    This capstone seminar provides an intensive experiential opportunity to develop a for-profit or social entrepreneurial enterprise business plan. During the seminar, faculty will work with students to identify entrepreneurial opportunities and will lead them in developing a detailed business plan to address that opportunity. At the end of the course, students will have an actionable business plan reviewed by outside advisors.

    Prerequisites: senior standing and ENT 2503  or LJS 3513 .

Special Topics/Independent Research in Entrepreneurship Courses

  
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    ENT 4Xn3 - Special Topics in [Insert Area] (3)


    This course is designed to quickly respond to ever-changing demands of business by housing one time course offering that will not likely be frequently repeated.

  
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    ENT 390V - Entrepreneur Internship (1-10) F, SP, SU


    Provides students with direct experience in an entrepreneurial environment. Students will demonstrate entrepreneurial ability by sourcing an internship that is approved. (Appropriate internships can be with established or start-up firms in either the for-profit or social sectors. In addition, legitimate student start-up businesses can be appropriate for this internship. In certain circumstances, student entrepreneurs can form teams for this internship. In a team approach, each team member must complete the work hours requirement.) At the end of this course, students will have the experience necessary to be successful in the entrepreneurship capstone course. 

    Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and ENT 2503 .
  
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    ENT 401V - Independent Study in Entrepreneurship (1-3) F, SP, SU


    Independent research of primary and secondary data in a selected topic - topic title to be approved by major professor.

    Prerequisites: Advanced standing, proven research ability, and approval of academic chair.
    Repeatable for a maximum of six hours.

Environmental and Sustainability Science Courses

  
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    ESS 1024 - The science of green living (4) F, SP


    This course takes an interdisciplinary scientific approach to addressing the issue of the sustainability of social,
    economic, and natural systems, with an emphasis on system transformation through green technologies and
    practices. The course covers a wide range of topics with an emphasis on the materials economy and fostering
    change toward sustainability. Appropriate lab activities are included. Lecture, 3 hours. Laboratory, 2 hours.

    3 hours
    2 hours
    This course may satisfy SALT Tier II credit.
  
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    ESS 2014 - Introduction to Sustainable Energy Sources (4) F offered even-numbered years


    With the growing realization that finite, non-renewable energy resources are becoming increasingly limited in supply and affordability, human prosperity and survival may depend on a continuing renewable energy supply. This course will cover fundamentals of sustainable energy technologies and their dynamic costs and benefits as these technologies evolve in science and the market place. Sustainable energy options reviewed in this course include but are not limited to solar, wind, biomass, oceanic, geothermal, hydropower, fuel cell (hydrogen) and other energy sources. The student will evaluate potential energy sources based on its quadruple bottom line of economic, equity, and environmental and eternal implications. This course meets the General Education science with laboratory requirement for all majors.

    Lecture, 3 hours
    Laboratory, 2 hours
  
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    ESS 2123 - Principles of Sustainability (3) SP Offered odd-numbered years


    This course represents a culmination of the undergraduate curriculum in Sustainability. The diverse subject areas that are relevant to sustainability will be brought together and synthesized into a cohesive body of knowledge.

    Lecture, 3 hours.
  
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    ESS 3133 - Community and Professional Service Learning (3) SP, SU


    Students provide community service and gain practical experience through mentored applications. Undergraduate students will work a minimum number of hours each week in a community “sustainability clinic” and/or in projects supervised by professional consultants and experienced graduate students in sustainability. Students may provide assistance to individuals, businesses, organizations or technical projects that identify sustainability practices, environmental management, technical options or potential natural resource management assistance needs. Topics may include any application within a major field of study, including but not limited to renewable energy, waste = food, water, technical design, food, small business, corporate, entrepreneurship, manufacturing, recreation, tourism, civic, transportation or climate. Department permission required. A minimum of 195 hours of service (during a semester) is required.

    This course may satisfy SALT Tier III credit.
  
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    ESS 3224 - Principles of Water Resources and Systems Management (4) F Offered odd-numbered years


    The course addresses the nature of fluid storage, movement and distribution in design systems and natural systems. Classroom simulations and site visits convey technical principles and methods of operation, processing and maintenance of design systems and natural treatment systems. These include surface and ground water resources, potable water and wastewater, including governing regulatory standards. Lecture: 3 hours. Lab: 2 hours.

    Lecture: 3 hours
    Lab: 2 hours
  
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    ESS 4213 - Environmental Law and Policy (3) SP Offered even-numbered years


    A course designed to familiarize the student with significant environmental legislation including: national environmental policy act (NEPA), clean water act (CWA), endangered species act, clean air act (CAA), resource conservation and recovery act (RCRA), comprehensive environmental response compensation and liability act (CERCLA), and federal insecticide, fungicide and rodenticide act (FIFRA). The course includes fact-based discussion on topics of national and global environmental topics such as: protection of the global atmosphere, international trade and the environment, and industrial development in the developing world.

  
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    ESS 4223 - Fundamentals of Environmental Management and Technology (3) SP Offered odd-numbered years


    Addresses the use of geospatial classification and measurement and map technology in the application of environmental management practices. Discussions and field reviews also address the selection, design and application of sustainability; compliance and remedial practices for air, water and land management; pollution control; animal waste; solid and hazardous waste, site characterization and cleanup; radiological control; and general pollution prevention among others.

  
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    ESS 4992 - Senior Seminar (2) F


    This course transitions the student to life-long professional learning and development. The course also builds advanced communication techniques where the student extracts and presents current “hot” topics from prominent professional, technical and scientific periodicals, journals and best-selling books, using a variety of advanced presentation tools, group discussion/consensus techniques, community seminars, web-based networking and interaction with professional role models and guest speakers. In addition, this course is designed to help students understand the application process for applying for graduate school or other professional studies.

    Prerequisite: senior status.

Special Topics/Independent Research in Environmental and Sustainability Science Courses

  
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    ESS 400V - Special Topics in Sustainability (1-3) F, SP, SU


    This course is designed to more quickly respond to the ever-changing world of sustainability by housing a number of learning options. Examples of potential course offerings include an online course which focuses on the entirety of Earth systems. LEED Certification and Green Building Design, Sustainable Development and Land Use, Sustainable Remediation and Mitigation of Natural Systems and Resources, Sustainable Management of Water Systems and Supplies and Storm Water. Some sections include international and domestic travel opportunities to various sustainability sites and conferences and will include reading and assignments pertaining to the travel experience. Additional travel fees apply.

  
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    ESS 450V - Independent Study and/or Senior Research (1-3) F


    This is a variable credit independent research or problem/solution based inquiry. This independent study course is expected to consist of a distinct question-based or problem-based, solution-oriented endeavor that engages the student in applying ecological, environmental or sustainability skills toward a real-world problem. This course is not intended to be a literature research course alone, but a problem-solving or question-answering endeavor. Students (with facilitation by the instructor or mentor) identify the area of particular interest and propose an appropriate project: a question to study, hypothesis to test or problem solve. Depending on the project type, the project will include an analytical element, for example, data collection and analysis, cost-benefit analysis, multi-criteria decision analysis, etc. Projects may be in the form of a traditional scientific hypothesis-testing or data-collecting research project (field, lab, metadata, etc.) ending in a scientific paper, a feasibility study ending in a technical paper, or a problem identification - solution proposal study ending in a white paper or other acceptable product. Independent study courses will end with the submission of an agreed upon product, most likely a formal paper and/or formal presentation. 1-3 hours.

    Prerequisite: ESS 2123 .

Exercise Science Courses

  
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    EX 2013 - Psychology and Sociology of Sport (3) Spring odd-numbered years


    This course is designed to introduce the topic of exercise psychology. Students will examine the psychological antecedents and consequences of physical activity relationships. Included are the mental health benefits of exercise as well as motivational factors involved in exercising and the many variables that influence exercise behavior, e.g., stress, emotional states, anxiety, and depression.

    PS1113 - Intro to Psychology

  
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    EX 2533 - Kinesiology (3) F


    A study of the science of human motion. Emphasis is upon anatomical analysis of body movement. This course embraces such areas as physics for mechanical and gravitational laws; anatomy for structures of bone, muscle, and nerve; and physiology for the action of muscle and nerve.

    BY 3514  OR BY 2434   OR BY 2213  recommended.
  
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    EX 3002 - Mechanics of Movement (2) SP


    A study of the practical application of muscular movement and motor patterns to exercise and sport.

  
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    EX 3363 - Biostatistics (3) SP


    This course is designed to help students learn elementary statistical methods and applications of these methods in a physical education, exercise science or physical therapy setting. The course content will cover basic descriptive and inferential statistical analyses, with an emphasis on the correct application of analyses. The course also involves measurement concepts in research for all types of human performance. Students will be introduced to statistics with computer applications.

    Prerequisites: Either MA 1043 , MA 1053 , MA 1113 , MA 1123  or MA 1314 .
  
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    EX 4113 - Exercise Physiology (3) F, SP


    A study of the physiologic adaptations during exercise and sport performance. Topics include nutrition and sports performance, metabolism and energy pathways, pulmonary, ventilatory and cardiovascular regulations during exercise, muscle function during exercise performance and the effects of exercise on body composition.

    Prerequisites: Either BY 3514  or BY 2434   or BY 2213  or permission of instructor.
  
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    EX 4123 - Exercise Physiology Lab (3) SP


    A laboratory class designed to assess the topics covered during Exercise Physiology. Lab topics include graded exercise testing (GXT), resting and exercise electrocardiography, strength and power assessment and other clinical exercise tests.

    Prerequisite: EX 4113 .
  
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    EX 4133 - Exercise Evaluation and Prescription (3) F


    A study of health and fitness evaluation and prescription objectives. This course is designed to meet the KSA’s for the ACSM Certified Exercise Physiologist certification exam.

    Prerequisite: EX 2533  

     
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: EX 4113  

  
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    EX 4153 - Strength and Conditioning Program Design (3) SP


    This course will introduce students to various methods of teaching resistance exercise in a group or individual setting. Both physical and psychological techniques for program implementation and client adherence will be addressed.

    Prerequisites: EX 2533  

     
    Prerequisite OR Corequisite: EX 4113  
    This course may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement.

  
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    EX 4163 - Applied Exercise Physiology (3) SP


    This course addresses additional subjects beyond the basic science of exercise physiology. Topics include exercise response under extreme physical stress, exercise and environmental conditions, exercise and children, exercise and the geriatric population, ergogenic aids and sports performance, and exercise in other special populations.

    EX 2533 EX 4113  
    This course satisfies the SALT Tier II requirement.
  
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    EX 4224 - Externship in Kinesiology (4) SU


    The student will select a wellness center, fitness center or clinical site for practical experience.

    Prerequisites: EX 4113 EX 4153  and senior standing.

Special Topics/Independent Research in Exercise Science Courses

  
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    EX 4Xn3 - Special Topics in Exercise Science: Exercise Psychology (3) Spring even-numbered years


    An in-depth discussion of Exercise Science related topics that are of interest to faculty and students.

  
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    EX 480V - Independent Study and/or Research in Exercise Science (1-4) F, SP, SU


    This course is designed to give students an opportunity to participate with faculty on an independent project in exercise science or physical education. Students should select an appropriate project and under the guidance of a faculty member, complete the proposed project. The project can be either laboratory or library oriented. A paper is usually required at the completion of the course.

    Prerequisite: Permission of academic chair.
    Repeatable for credit (maximum credit six hours).

Family Science Courses

  
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    FS 1011 - Professional Orientation (1) F


    A study of the family science discipline as well as career opportunities within the related areas of specialization. Required of all family science majors; to be completed prior to declaration of major in the program.

  
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    FS 2233 - Family and Intimate Relationships: Christian Perspectives 3 Fall, Spring


     

    The course aimed at equipping students with academic and applied knowledge regarding human relationships, specifically intimate relationships such as marriage and family. Family and Intimate Relationships: Christians Perspectives will be viewed through a number of lenses with substantial emphasis given to a distinctly Christian perspective. The “Model for Marital Complexity” will be used as a framework for structuring our learning.

  
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    FS 2503 - Families and Spirituality (3) F


    An exploration of relational spirituality: The influences of spiritual matters and religious practice on family life and relationship processes. 

  
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    FS 3153 - Nurturing Spiritual Development in Children (3) F


    This course unpacks current definitions of children’s spirituality, examines biblical and theological foundations of children’s spirituality, and explains and critiques current theories on children’s spiritual
    development. Most importantly, it explores a variety of ways to nurture spiritual development in children in both faith-based and secular settings. 

  
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    FS 3413 - Children in Health Care (3) F Offered on-demand


    Instruction on techniques used to help minimize the potential negative impact of the health care environment on children’s development. Includes the establishment of supportive relationships with families, assessment skills for child life specialists, psychological preparation, medical play, planning, and adaptation of therapeutic and diversionary activities, coping techniques and the use of language in communicating effectively with children and practicing family-centered care within a team of professionals.

    Prerequisite: FS 2413 .
  
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    FS 3423 - Foundation and Theory of Child Life Practice (3) SP Offered on-demand


    Basic introduction to the theory, history and scope of child life practice, including the development of the profession and the current role as a member of the multidisciplinary health care team.

  
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    FS 3433 - Family Interaction (3) SP (Odd years)


    A review of trends and research in family relationships as well as related models and programs.

  
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    FS 3443 - Principles of Effective Parenting 3 SP


    This course explores the nature of parenting and parent/child relations over the lifespan from a historical, theoretical, and developmental perspective. It examines parenting styles and practices, discipline, attachment, and the unique challenges faced by families in today’s complex society, including a diverse range of family structures. The course will also help students identify the influences that have shaped their view of parenting and explore biblical and theological principles of parenting.

  
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    FS 3463 - Introduction to Play Therapy 3 F


    This course covers an overview of child development including brain and relational development, as well as an understanding of modalities, techniques, applications, and skills involved in play therapy . It includes an experiential component to develop basic play therapy skills within the context of ethical and diversity-sensitive practice. Students are invited to pursue specific interests and professional development through individualization of assignments and course activities.

  
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    FS 3503 - Family Problems (3) SP


    A study of family difficulties and development with emphasis placed on the understanding of family dysfunction through the application of systems theory.

  
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    FS 3513 - Family Resource Management (3) SP


    Management of family resources as they relate to satisfying family and life needs.

  
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    FS 3523 - Family Life Education (3) F


    The general philosophy and broad principles of family life education in conjunction with the ability to plan, implement, and evaluate such educational programs. This class content is designed to meet competencies of the National Council on Family Relations Certified Family Life Education program.

  
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    FS 3533 - Early and Middle Childhood Development 3 F


    A basic study of early and middle childhood development from birth through the first twelve years as well as the environment that facilitates a child’s physical, social, emotional, and spiritual growth and development during this period.

  
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    FS 3563 - Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood 3 S


    Content addresses the transition from adolescence to emerging adulthood. The psychological implications of the adolescent experience and further development into adulthood pertaining to identity, family, love, sex, cohabitation, marriage, career and community (e.g. religion and politics) will be considered. Sources of resilience and vulnerabilities will be addressed as this pertains to diverse factors, including cultural variables and the role of social media. The course will consider culture, history, and research related to adolescence and emerging adulthood.

  
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    FS 4092 - Senior Seminar (2) SP


    Comprehensive survey, current trends and projects in the various areas of family science.

    Prerequisites: Declared major in Family Science (any track), completion of professional orientation and senior standing.
  
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    FS 4403 - Families in Later Adulthood (3) F


    A study of aging within the context of a family system. Addresses demographic trends; influences on families; role changes of family members; intergenerational relationships; economic, political and social policy affecting family life; and cultural variations and supportive resources for older persons and their families. Also explores career options in working with families and aging individuals.

  
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    FS 4413 - Family Law, Policy, and Ethics 3 F


    A course which focuses on current and historical perspectives on the family through the lenses of law, policy, and ethics. This course will be an exploration of how law and policy impact behaviors of individuals, couples, and families. It will also explore ethics for family life educators and marriage and family therapists. This course is designed to prepare students for futures as Certified Family Life Educators per the NCFR requirements. 


Special Topics/Independent Research in Family Science Courses

  
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    FS 37nV - Special Topics (1, 2, 3)


    Topics of special interest to students and faculty which do not fit one of the current classifications. Students may repeat this course when course numbers are different. These courses are advanced and are intended for students genuinely interested in their content. Permission of the professor may be required. Specific titles will be announced in the course schedule.

  
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    FS 400V - Travel (1, 2, 3) SP


    Offers opportunity to gain experiential knowledge about specific areas of specialization within family science.

    Repeatable up to six hours with chair approval.
  
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    FS 401V - Independent Study and Research (1, 2, 3) Offered on demand


    Advanced study or research in a specific area of family science. Prerequisites: Courses in the area in which independent study is to be done and with the approval of the academic chair. Open to juniors and seniors only.

    This course may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement.
  
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    FS 404V - Internship in Family Science (1, 2, 3) Offered on Demand


    Supervised field work in an institution or agency that has an established program or purpose to provide services to individuals or families in an area related to the student’s chosen area of concentration. The student observes, works and contributes to the typical operation of the particular setting. Prearranged and supervised experience must be completed during one term, with regularly scheduled meetings with the instructor and/or supervisor. To be taken in the junior or senior year, after completing a minimum of nine upper-division hours in the concentration. May be repeated for up to 6 hours credit.

    This course may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement.

Fashion and Design Courses

  
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    FD 1011 - Professional Orientation (1) F


    A study of the discipline as well as career opportunities within the related areas of specialization. Required of all Fashion majors (Design and Merchandising); to be completed prior to declaration of major in the department.

  
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    FD 1113 - Clothing Construction I (3) F, SP


    Student acquires skills in garment construction, fitting techniques, and use of construction equipment. Students should be able to apply intermediate apparel construction principles, techniques and skills in the production of various garments including design concepts, selecting and preparing patterns, operating sewing equipment, and completing a sewing project. Students will submit a portfolio of work to the instructor for a grade. Lecture/lab class.

    Lecture/lab class.
    $75 Lab Fee
  
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    FD 1123 - Clothing Construction II (3) SP


    Emphasis on unique and creative designs with manipulation of appropriate and more difficult fabrics. The student will focus on the planning and construction of an ensemble of intermediate complexity; and will gain more confidence and speed in their design developments, pattern making and construction

    Prerequisite: FD 1113  
    Lecture/Lab Class.
    $75 Lab Fee
  
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    FD 1323 - Basic Design (3)


    Basic principles and elements of design are studied and explored. Particular emphasis is given to examples in the areas of fashion and interior design. 

  
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    FD 2113 - Textiles (3) SP


    Natural and man-made fibers and their development into yarns and finished fabrics. Physical properties, uses and care of fabrics.

  
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    FD 2133 - Fashion Industry (3) F


    A study of contemporary design, designers and trends in the fashion industry. This course gives a comprehensive overview of all aspects of the fashion industry including women’s, men’s, accessories and home. Emphasis is placed on product development and the role of technology and globalization. Suitable for non-majors.

  
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    FD 2233 - Interior Design I (3) F


    A study of space requirements, using the systems approach, with attention given to architectural styles, construction, and the reading, judging and drawing of house plans.

    Prerequisite: FD 1323
    Lecture/Lab
    $75 Lab Fee
  
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    FD 2243 - Interior Design II (3) SP


    Study of the components of an interior including wall, floor, window treatment, lighting, furniture arranging, accessories, fabric selection and planning and designing limited and complex living spaces.

    Prerequisite: FD 2233  
    Lecture/Lab
    $75 Lab Fee
  
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    FD 3103 - History of Costume (3) F


    Survey of the development of clothing from ancient civilization through the 19th century. Specific styles, as well as social, psychological and economic aspects of clothing are covered.

  
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    FD 3113 - Fashion Buying and Merchandising I (3) F


    A fundamental study of the fiscal management and proficiency of the contemporary retail environment, this course will involve a study of the retail industry.  Examples include quantitative procedures for planning and analyzing sales, inventories, and profits. Emphasis is placed on pricing and purchasing retail inventories in this course.

  
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    FD 3123 - Display and Promotion (3) SP


    This course is a study to facilitate an understanding of the essentials of visual merchandising and its relationship to the buying, selling and marketing of retail merchandise. An understanding of design, lighting, and materials is developed in this course; and students will gain hands-on experience in both visual display and fashion show production.

  
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    FD 3133 - Flat Pattern Design (3) F, Offered odd-numbered years


    The flat pattern method of making patterns. Half-scale patterns are used for learning purposes. A full-scale sloper is made for the individual and a garment is designed.

    Prerequisite: FD 1113
    Lecture/Lab
    $75 Lab Fee
  
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    FD 3143 - 20th Century Fashion (3) SP


    This course will examine the history of fashion from the U.S., Europe, Asia and other influential countries from 1898 to the present. A comprehensive study will be explored for the social, economic and technological themes that helped shape each era.

  
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    FD 3153 - Draping (3) S, Offered odd-numbered years


    Draping examines the process of creating a three-dimensional garment from the two-dimensional fabric. The principles and processes of draping, advanced flat-pattern making, and industrial construction methods, the nature of materials, body structure, function, and fashion are studied using a variety of materials are investigated through project work. Students excelling in this course will demonstrate basic draping skills, and the ability to create pattern shapes for any design.

    Prerequisite: FD 1113  FD 1323
    Lecture/Lab
    $75 Lab Fee
    Also serves as upper level Theatre Elective / Special Topics option.
  
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    FD 3163 - Fashion Buying and Merchandising II (3) S


    This course provides an overview and analysis of current color, fiber, and fashion trends, as well as their impact on fashion product development from concept to consumer. Students will examine the merchandising process and learn to apply business strategies to achieve profitability.

    Prerequisite: FD 1323  FD 3113   
  
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    FD 3323 - Materials and Resources for Interior Design (3) SP


    The study of current products and resources available to interior designers. This course includes a supervised sponsored trip to a major market. Trip expenses are not included in tuition.

  
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    FD 4092 - Senior Seminar (2) SP


    Comprehensive survey, current trends and projects in the various areas of Fashion, Fashion Merchandising, Interior Design, and Entertainment Design. Instructor Approval Required: yes

    Prerequisite: Senior classification

Special Topics/Independent Research in Fashion and Design Courses

  
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    FD 37nV - Special Topics (1),(2), or (3)


    Topics of special interest in the areas of Fashion, Fashion Merchandising, Interior Design, and Entertainment Design. Instructor Approval Required:depending on course.

    Instructor Approval required;

     
    May also serve as upper level Theatre Elective / Special Topics option with Theatre Chair’s approval.

  
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    FD 400V - Travel (1), (2), or (3) SU


    Offers opportunity to gain experiential knowledge about specific areas of specialization within the Fashion, Fashion Merchandising, Interior Design, and Entertainment Design industries. Repeatable up to six hours with chair approval. Instructor Approval Require: yes.

    Instructor Approval required

    Chair approval required if repeating

     
    May also serve as upper level Theatre Elective / Special Topics option with Theatre Chair’s approval.

  
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    FD 401V - Independent Study and Research (1), (2), or (3) Offered on Demand


    Advanced study or research in a specific area of Fashion, Fashion Merchandising, Interior Design, or Entertainment Design. Prerequisites: Courses in the area in which independent study is to be done and with the approval of the academic chair. This course may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement.  Instructor Approval Required: yes.

    Instructor Approval required
  
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    FD 404V - Internship in Fashion and Design (1), (2), or (3) Offered on Demand


    Supervised field work in an institution or agency that has an established program or purpose related to the student’s chosen area of concentration. The student observes, works and contributes to the typical operation of the particular setting. Prearranged and supervised experience must be completed during one term, with regularly scheduled meetings with the instructor and/or supervisor. To be taken in the junior or senior year, after completing a minimum of six upper-division hours in the concentration. May be repeated for up to 6 hours credit. This course may satisfy the SALT Tier II requirement. Instructor Approval Required: yes; Also required is Internship approval from the Career Services Center.

    Instructor Approval;

    Internship Approval with Career Services Center


Film and Creative Media Courses

  
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    FICM 1013 - History of TV and Film (3)


    History of TV and Film - This survey course will give students a thorough understanding of the fascinating intersection between artistry and economics in Hollywood cinema from the beginning of film and television history to the present. 

  
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    FICM 1023 - Line Producing (3)


    This class will approach film production from prep to post from the perspective of the independent film producer. This will include introductory workshops on all the different departments, including technical areas such as grip, electric, and camera. The students will learn how to break down and budget a script, schedule a shoot, create and fill out paper-work such as deal memos, call sheets, contracts, location scouting, holding auditions, etc. 

  
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    FICM 1033 - Film Festival Class (3) FA/SP


    Film festivals are an important part of a filmmaker’s career providing opportunities for networking, employment, further education and viewing other filmmakers’ works. The Film Festival class takes students to a major North American Film Festival such as: Sundance, Tribeca, South By Southwest, etc. in order to experience an elite Film festival experience. The students with gain valuable knowledge on how to navigate and effectively use a festival to further their Film education and career.

  
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    FICM 1041 - Film Practicum (1) FA, SP


    The Film practicum enables students to practice what they have learned in the classroom and apply it to “real world settings.” Students will volunteer/intern on projects related to the TV/Film industry for 30 hours in a semester. These hours can also be achieved through attending Film/TV oriented events such as industry panels and workshops. The supervising professor must approve all practicum hours.

     

    Lab
    Repeatable

  
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    FICM 1043 - Film Practicum I (3)


    The Film practicum enables students to practice what they have learned in the classroom and apply it to “real world settings.” Students will volunteer/intern on projects related to the TV/Film industry for 30 hours in a semester. These hours can also be achieved through attending Film/TV oriented events such as industry panels and workshops. The supervising professor must approve all practicum hours.

  
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    FICM 1603 - Screenwriting (3)


    This course provides students with the tools to understand basic cinematic story structure, the creative vision to conceptualize their own story, the understanding of what it takes to complete a screenplay that is influenced by Christian values and a working knowledge of the film industry.

    Prerequisite: TH 1533 .
  
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    FICM 1703 - Film Production Workshop (3)


    A course focusing on beginning film production where skills in the five disciplines- film producing, directing, cinematography, editing, sound recording, sound editing, and sound design-are all developed. Students learn to work in collaborative teams in multiple areas to fulfill a director’s vision for a film.

    Prerequisite: TH 1533 .
  
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    FICM 1803 - Theatre Workshop: Practicum (1) F, SP


    This course teaches the craft of film directing through analysis of the work of classic and contemporary directors. The class also investigates the art and language of filmmaking through these topics: framing and composition, camera angles, camera movement, blocking of actors, visualizing action, creating a sequence, script breakdown, and techniques for establishing mood, character, and conflict. By the end of class students will create a short film of their own. There is a required lab.

    Prerequisite: TH 1533 .
  
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    FICM 2013 - Cinema Aesthetics (3)


    This class helps students unpack the significance of the “worlds” that narrative films create, offering an innovative perspective on cinema as art. Drawing on aesthetics
    and the philosophy of art in both the continental and analytic traditions, as well as classical and contemporary film theory, it pulls together multiple approaches to understanding Cinema Aesthetics. 

  
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    FICM 2023 - Editing (3)


    This class will approach nonlinear film editing from logging footage to completing a motion picture. This will include accurately logging footage, titling, proper use of transitional elements and overall storytelling in the post- production process. 

  
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    FICM 2033 - Cinematography (3)


    This course will give an overview of the art and science of cinematography. The course will concentrate on cinematic theory, use of lenses, use of focus, working with lights, thorough knowledge of how a camera works, mise en scene, properly framing shots, storytelling using a camera, and the responsibilities of a camera team on a film shoot. 

  
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    FICM 2043 - Lighting and Grip (3)


    This class will focus on film grip and lighting work. The course will cover everything from the basics of setting up a C-stand, to properly operating a dolly and setting up track. It will also introduce three point lighting and will survey different types of effective lighting for cinema and some of the common equipment that is used. 

  
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    FICM 2053 - Film & Culture (3)


    This course is an examination into the importance of film the socialization and representation of cultures.  Students will learn theories behind the study of film and culture as well as learn to engage critically with film as a text. Through the examination of the representation of culture, students will begin to recognize and make connections across various cultural practices and systems different from their own.

  
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    FICM 3013 - Audio for Film (3)


    (Production and Post) - This class will focus on film and television audio. The course will split its focus between live sound capture and post-audio production. Students will learn the nuances of audio acquisition and mixing on a Film/TV set and finishing sound for a project including: foley, sound design and multi-layer mixing. 

  
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    FICM 3023 - Screen Acting (3)


    This class provides the skills and knowledge needed to achieve professional screen acting performances for film and television. 

  
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    FICM 3033 - Directing for Film (3)


    Students will learn the basics of Film Directing. This class focuses on the skills and knowledge needed for directors to make professional decisions concerning how to approach a film project in a comprehensive way as well as working with the details of a singular scene. In addition, students will learn to work with actors to get the very best performances out of them. The course will offer hands- on opportunities for the students to practice analyzing, blocking and directing a small scene. 

  
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    FICM 3043 - Filmmaking for Change 3


    Documentary filmmaking involves research, collaboration and strong filmmaking techniques. This course introduces students to the storytelling structure and theory of non-fiction filmmaking. There will be more of a focus on nonfiction storytelling in the space of social issues, environmental issues or other stories that address communicating awareness and change. This course will also elevate the student’s camera technique, sound recording,editing and graphic design skills as they explore methods to tell stories.

  
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    FICM 3053 - TV Writing 3


    This course focuses on the format and style of writing for television entertainment, specifically the
    30min sitcom and the 1hr drama, and the Webseries. Students will practice writing and produce both a final spec script.
    Students will learn about the structure and function of the television industry writing rooms and what the responsibilities
    of the head writer and/or showrunner are.

  
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    FICM 4013 - Digital Imaging (After Effects, Color, etc.) (3)


    This class will focus on advanced elements of digital effects from titling to scrubbing, to various kinds of digital image manipulation. Additionally, the students will learn new digital imaging roles such as that of the DIT (Digital Imaging Technician), Digital Loader, and Data Manager, which are all integral to today’s motion picture production process. 

  
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    FICM 4033 - Advanced Directing for Film (Short Narrative) (3)


    This class will focus on advanced elements of film directing. The course will cover script analysis, blocking and working with actors. The course culminates in the completion of a short film. 

  
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    FICM 4603 - Screenwriting II (Feature length)


    This course will take the concepts of Screenwriting and build on them. The course will concentrate on the finer points of story and screenwriting as well as advanced script analysis. The students will have three choices as to what kind of script they will write: A feature-length screenplay, three episodes of an original sitcom or two hour-long TV dramas. 

  
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    FICM 4903 - Senior Capstone 3


    In this course, students create a film project either in Screenwriting, Film, or Creative Media that
    exemplifies the culmination of their prior years courses. Students will work independently as the professor of the course
    oversees the process and follow through on agreed goals for the project. The final project will be of high quality, based
    on strong technical, creative and storytelling benchmarks set forth in a rubric for each area of Capstone choices
    (Screenwriting, Film, Creative Media).

    Discipline
    Film Production
 

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