Sep 30, 2022  
2017-2018 Graduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences


Return to {$returnto_text} Return to: All Graduate Programs

Pharmacy and Health Sciences

  • Doctor of Pharmacy
  • Dual Degree: Doctor of Pharmacy and Master of Management (MM)
  • Dual Degree: Doctor of Pharmacy and Master of Science in Health Care Informatics (MHCI)
  • Degree-Certificate: Doctor of Pharmacy and Certificate in Health Care Informatics

Roger L. Davis, Dean, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences
Beth Breeden, Director, Graduate Studies in Health Care Informatics
Susan Morley, Director, Dual Degree Pharm.D./Master of Management

Core Faculty

Scott Akers, Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Elizabeth Breeden, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Ronda Bryant, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Abbie Tucker Burka, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Tom Campbell, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Kevin Clauson, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Zachary Cox, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice
R. Nathan Daniels, Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Roger L. Davis, Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Joseph Deweese, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Kevin Eidson, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Danielle Falconer, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Mike Fowler, Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Chad Gentry, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Ben Gross, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Klarissa Hardy Jackson, Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Randy Jerkins, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Jeff Lee, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Susan Mercer, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Lindsey Miller, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Susan Morley, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Michelle Mosley, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Whitney Narramore, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Kam Nola, Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Robin Parker, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Steve Phipps, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Jonathon Pouliot, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Allison Provine, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Julie Wilbeck Stephens, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Richard Thompson, Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Jimmy Torr, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Sarah Uroza, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Matt Vergne, Assistant Research Scientist of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Jessica Wallace, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Greg Young, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice

 

Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy is an extraordinary college steeped in the traditions of public service, focused on health care delivery to the public, and committed to the principles of Christian service. The College of Pharmacy at Lipscomb University embraces an environment that emphasizes a commitment to academic excellence and a life of Christian faith.

Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy has been granted full accreditation status by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education. The college has demonstrated to the satisfaction of ACPE that the program complies with accreditation standards, including the appropriateness of the program’s mission and goals, the adequacy of resources and organization to meet the mission and goals, outcomes which indicate that the mission and goals are being met, and the reasonable assurance of the continued compliance with standards.

The College prepared for the most recent ACPE accreditation site-visit during 2013-2014, ending with an accreditation site visit in February 2014. Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy has fulfilled the accreditation requirements set forth by ACPE for the Professional Degree Program in Pharmacy and is granted Accreditation Status through June 30, 2018.

The official ACPE statement is as follows: “Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences’ Doctor of Pharmacy program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education, 135 South LaSalle Street, Suite 4100, Chicago, IL 60503, 312/664-3575; FAX 312/664-4652. Web site www.acpe-accredit.org.”

Message from the Dean

Building a college to educate health care professionals for a life of service.

Welcome to the Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. Thank you for your interest in this opportunity for professional education. Lipscomb University has a rich history in preparing students to be leaders in multiple career fields and, most importantly, a strong history in preparing students for a life of service. Lipscomb University’s legacy and tradition of excellence extends to the field of pharmacy education and is expanding in the field of health care informatics. The location in Nashville, Tenn., is an incredible asset for our students. Nashville is the nation’s health care industry capital, growing with opportunities every day.

The pharmacy profession is growing and is in the midst of a revolution in health care delivery and the improvement of quality of life for millions of individuals. At the center of this revolution is the discovery of and appropriate use of medications. Pharmacists in a variety of practice settings will bear accountability for achieving optimum outcomes for patients. Pharmacy is a service profession built on compassion and commitment to those who have health care needs. It is critical that pharmacists, as essential members of the health care team, apply Christian principles such as compassion, understanding and caring into their practices.

Health care informatics is a growing and emerging discipline which evaluates the application of biomedical informatics methods and techniques utilized in the provision of health care services. Also included is the vital role HCI plays in enhancing the quality of care, reducing health care costs and addressing health issues. The newly offered dual degree in pharmacy and health care informatics is designed to develop health care leaders ready to meet the current and future challenges of the health care industry.

The College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences at Lipscomb University embraces an environment that emphasizes a commitment to a life of Christian mission and ideals. It is an exciting time to be in the health care industry, and Lipscomb University is an exciting place to begin that journey.

If you would like more information regarding the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, email us at pharmacy@lipscomb.edu or call 888.333.4358, ext. 7160. We also encourage you to personally visit our campus at any opportunity.

- Roger L. Davis, Pharm.D., dean and professor

Mission-College of Pharmacy

The mission for the Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences is to provide an educational environment characterized by academic excellence and Christian faith, where student pharmacists are prepared to optimize patient medication outcomes in an ethical and compassionate practice. The college will achieve its mission by improving patient care through:

  • Excellence in education
  • Excellence in scholarship
  • Clinical and professional service
  • Professional development
  • Interdisciplinary collaboration

Admission Policies and Procedures

  • Complete a minimum of 64 semester hours of preprofessional education at accredited college or university.
    • The pre-pharmacy education will require a minimum of 64 semester hours. Required pre-pharmacy courses should be completed by the end of the summer semester prior to desired enrollment; however, course work may be in progress or planned at the time of application without it negatively impacting the application. If an applicant has not completed all required pre-pharmacy course work prior to submitting the application, a proposed plan for completion is required as part of the application process. The required pre-pharmacy courses are listed in the section below titled Pharmacy Prerequisites.
    • Achievement of a grade of “C-” or higher for each required pre-pharmacy course is mandatory.
  • Attain a cumulative academic grade-point average of not less than 2.5 on a 4.0 scale for all courses.
  • Complete the Pharmacy College Admission Test.
    • Applicants must take the PCAT to be considered for admission.
    • The Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy Admissions Committee strongly advises applicants to take the PCAT in the summer or fall prior to the year of admission. This time line provides an opportunity to take the test again if it is believed that a re-examination will significantly improve your score. If the Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy receives results from multiple test dates, the highest scores across all results will be accepted.  Composite scores of at least 45% with scores of 30% in each sub-category are preferred.
    • PCAT testing is administered through:
      Pearson
      19500 Boulevard Rd.
      San Antonio, TX 78259
      1.800.622.3231 or 210.339.8710
      website: www.pcatweb.info
  • Submit online the Application for Admission and Supplemental Application.
    • Applications for the upcoming enrolling year will be submitted through the Pharmacy College Application Service. Application reviews begin in Sept. Detailed instructions for submitting the application, transcripts and letters of recommendation through PharmCAS may be found online at pharmacy.lipscomb.edu or at www.pharmcas.org in the school pages section. The deadline for application submission is approximately March 1 each year.
    • A supplemental application is also required. This application is available online.  A $50 nonrefundable fee must accompany your supplemental application.
    • Payment can be processed online at the time of supplemental application submission using a debit or credit card.
    • If online payment by debit or credit card is not an option, then a check or money order made to the Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy may be mailed to the address below. Please print and include a copy of the completed application if payment is made via mail.
           Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy
           Director of Admissions and Student Affairs
           One University Park Drive
           Nashville, TN 37204-3951
    • Applications will not be accepted via fax transmission.
  • Prepare for an admissions interview.
    An on-site interview is required for admission to Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy. Interviews are conducted by invitation only. The Office of Student Affairs at the Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy will evaluate each application for competitiveness and request an interview with those determined to be qualified applicants. Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy utilizes a rolling admissions process and candidates are accepted at the discretion of the admissions committee based upon their qualifications and interview. Applicants are interviewed and admissions decisions are made on a continual basis October through June or until the class is filled. Applicants are strongly encouraged to apply early.

College of Pharmacy International Student Admission Policies and Procedures

  • International students must follow the same admissions procedures and meet the same requirements as applicants who are U.S. citizens (see Admission Policies and Procedures) in addition to the following specific requirements. There will be no exceptions to this policy.
  • Individuals are considered international if they:
    • Are not a United States citizen; or
    • Do not have permanent resident status; or 
    • Are United States citizens but have international transcripts.
  • International applicants must have been enrolled at an accredited U.S. college or university for a minimum of two years prior to the planned enrollment date.
  • International applicants should complete all the pre-pharmacy course requirements at a U.S. institution. Any prerequisite courses taken at institutions outside of the United States must be evaluated and approved.
    • After all of the required documents are received, the Office of Student Affairs will evaluate whether the course work can be applied to the prerequisite requirements for admission. English courses taken outside of the United States will not be accepted toward meeting the English requirements unless English is the official language of the university attended and all instruction is conducted in English.
  • International students are required to be proficient in written and oral English.
    • Applicants whose native language is not English must present the results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language. The Minimum TOEFL scores are 213 for the computer exam and 550 for the paper exam. The equivalent TOEFL ibt score is 80. Lipscomb’s TOEFL code is 1161. These scores should be submitted through PharmCAS.
      [Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) www.toefl.org]
  • Submit the PharmCAS application including all academic records from colleges and universities located both inside and outside the United States.
    • Course-by-course reports from the transcript evaluation services World Education Services or Educational Credential Evaluators must accompany international transcripts. Evaluations from other services are not accepted.
      [World Education Services www.wes.org; Educational Credential Evaluators eval@ece.org]
    • The outside assessments by WES and ECE are subject to review and approval by the Office of Student Affairs. This includes, but is not limited to, decisions regarding acceptable credit, prerequisite fulfillment, GPA calculations, degree equivalencies and minimum passing grade levels, among other things. The college is not obligated to accept the conclusion of any outside evaluation service.
    • Official, final transcripts for both international and U.S. course work will be required prior to matriculation.
  • Submit the Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy Supplemental Application online. Nonrefundable fee: $50.
    Lipscomb Supplemental Application, pharmacy.lipscomb.edu
  • International applicants must provide copies of current status with the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service at the time of application; i.e., VISA, I-94 and I-20 documents.
  • For Lipscomb to provide a student visa, international applicants must provide financial statements requested from their U.S. banking institution that shows adequate funds needed for all expenses for at least one year related to enrollment in the Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy.

Documentation

Students are required to provide satisfactory documentation of personal identification for off-site learning experiences required in many programs of graduate study at Lipscomb University. Failure to provide proper credentials will result in failure to complete the desired course of study. For complete policy, see section entitled Required Documentation for Off-Site Learning Experiences  in the opening section of this catalog.

Financial Information (Pharm.D.)

Tuition and Fees for 2017-18* 

Tuition (per year) $37,938
   
Fees  
First professional year (P1) $2,891
Second professional year (P2) $2,921
Third professional year (P3) $2,816
Fourth professional year (P4) $2,273

Room and board charges per semester are available in the undergraduate catalog.

*Effective May 1, 2017

Student Pharmacist Voluntary Withdrawal Policy

Acceptance of a position in a class of the College of Pharmacy is viewed as a long-term commitment and different from registering for classes in an undergraduate program. The curriculum of the College of Pharmacy is offered in fulfillment of a professional degree where the focus of education is more narrow and the intensity of effort is more profound. Since classes are admitted only one time a year for a defined number of students, the opportunity to replace student pharmacists who choose to voluntarily withdraw is extremely limited. It is the operational policy of the Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy that no potential student pharmacist will be asked to join any class after the official fifth day of classes, unless there is agreement between the dean and the provost that it will be in the best interests of the student pharmacist and the college to permit a later start.

Therefore, the college’s policy on voluntary withdrawal and refund of tuition and fees for the College of Pharmacy is as follows.

  1. Upon acceptance by an applicant of a position in a class of the College of Pharmacy, the student pays an initial deposit to hold the position. This deposit is nonrefundable. The full deposit amount is lost if the student pharmacist then chooses to forfeit his or her position in the class.
  2. Fees, including textbooks, assessed as a part of the registration process are nonrefundable if a student pharmacist chooses to voluntarily withdraw from the College of Pharmacy.
  3. A student pharmacist is considered enrolled in the College of Pharmacy when all steps of their registration are complete including final arrangements for payment for all student pharmacist charges through one of the options offered by the university and the date for completion of registration as defined by the college is passed. At this point, the student pharmacist makes a commitment to pay all fees and tuition associated with that respective year of the college’s curriculum.
  4. If a student pharmacist chooses to voluntarily withdraw from the College of Pharmacy after being officially registered, then an official withdrawal process must take place. To withdraw from the College of Pharmacy, a student pharmacist should first contact the director of student affairs and the associate dean for academic affairs. If classes have begun, all parties should meet with the dean of the college and complete the College of Pharmacy withdrawal form and pay a withdrawal fee of $195.
  5. Refund of the tuition shall be according to the following schedule:
    From official registration completion to one week before the first official day of orientation 100%
    From one week before the first official day of orientation through the official fifth day of class 50%
    After the official fifth day of class None
    For the second or any subsequent semester of the program None
  6. By completing registration in the College of Pharmacy, each student pharmacist has agreed to meet all financial obligations to the Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy. Failure to meet these obligations may result in a variety of activities being pursued toward collection of the outstanding obligations.

Academic Policies (Pharmacy)

College of Pharmacy Guidelines for Academic Performance
 
1. The implementation of all guidelines will be in addition to that of existing policies and standards of the University as published in the current Lipscomb University Catalog. The College’s policies and procedures have been drafted in such a manner to be consistent with University policies and procedures whenever possible. However, due to differences in student bodies, faculty, and external relationships, there is a need for distinct policies.
2. The profession of pharmacy has earned the title “the most respected healthcare professional” due to years of professionalism displayed to patients, colleagues, and society in general. The goal at Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy is to continue this tradition by providing a community of scholars and learners where core values of Christlikeness, truth, excellence and service integrate our faith and ethics with the practice of academic pursuits. As citizens of this community, student pharmacists, faculty and staff share the responsibility for promoting a climate of integrity. While we accept student pharmacists from any religious background, our faculty is exclusively Christian, and as a distinctively Christian university, our culture will be based on Christian values. The pursuit of truth is a core value of the College and lays the foundation for lifelong integrity. In every facet of our work, we seek excellence in the pursuit of knowledge and the courage to make difficult choices even at personal cost. In our service to this community, our actions should reflect the second great command “to love your neighbor as yourself.” This command compels us to respect others, to treat others fairly and honestly, and to assume personal responsibility. Our life is built on the foundation of serving others and living in truth. A community built on these principles cannot accept cheating, lying, fraud, theft, and other dishonest behaviors that jeopardize the rights and welfare of the community and diminish the worth of academic integrity of the community. The Community of Faith sets out broad principles. From these broad principles flow policies and practices for members of the Lipscomb University Community. The Academic Integrity Policy identifies specific definitions of policy infractions, provides a listing of sanctions which students may face, and identifies the specific steps in the process. Please see the separate policy relating to Academic Integrity for specific information.
3. Letter grading system and quality points
3.1. All work in the Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy is graded by letters. Each letter is in turn assigned a quality-point value according to the following:
Grade      Quality Points
   A                 4.0
   B                 3.0
   C                 2.0
   F         No Quality Points
3.2. The College has adopted a numerical scoring system where a 70% score is the minimum passing score. The following is the grading scale:
Grade        Numerical Score
   A               90 or above
   B                   80-89
   C                   70-79
   F               69 or below
4. Admission to the College is contingent on a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5. Student pharmacists accepted to the program with coursework still outstanding are expected to maintain this minimum GPA until the time of matriculation. Failure to do so will jeopardize the prospective student pharmacist’s seat in the program. A student may not enter the College while on academic warning status or academic suspension.
5. Early Identification of Academic Difficulty
5.1. During the P1, P2, and P3 years, the Academic Progression Committee will monitor student pharmacists’ academic performance each semester. As a step to identify early academic difficulty, the Academic Progression Committee will monitor progress throughout the semester and then perform a formal review at the end of each semester to determine if progression is warranted. The first step of the monitoring process is that faculty mentors will be notified of academic progress of their mentees after the first assessments of the semester are complete, or earlier if a problem is noted by faculty. Mentors will provide academic counsel to those student pharmacists with early academic struggles. After the midpoint of the semester assessments are completed, this same review will take place and student pharmacists with continued struggles will be sent to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for additional academic counseling. The Academic Progression Committee will use a delegate, normally the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, to convey their recommendations to the student pharmacist. At the conclusion of the semester, academic performance is once again reviewed by the faculty mentors and the Academic Progression Committee.
5.2. During the P4 year, student pharmacists’ academic performance will continue to be monitored by the Academic Progression Committee. Additionally, the Associate Dean for Experiential Education and the Experiential Education Committee will also evaluate student pharmacist/preceptor performance and this evaluation will take place at the end of each practice experience cycle.
5.3. Anyone identified as having less than “C” performance in any required course will receive written communication indicating the need for improvement and the need to meet with the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.
6. Academic Jeopardy: Student Pharmacists are considered to be in academic jeopardy if they 1) fail to have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.3; 2) fail to have a GPA of at least 3.0 in their advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) at the midpoint of the fourth professional year; and 3) have received a failing grade and subject to remediation. Additionally, student pharmacists with two or more failing grades at the semester midpoint are considered to be in academic jeopardy and are subject to the stipulations outlined in Article 6.6.
6.1. Academic Warning: A P1 student pharmacist with a GPA for the first semester below 2.3 will be placed on Academic Warning. This is a one-time warning available only to P1 student pharmacists finishing the first semester. Student pharmacists on Academic Warning who do not raise their GPA to 2.3 by the end of their next semester in school will be placed on academic probation. P1 student pharmacists on Academic Warning will be required to participate in Pharmacy Turning Point, a program designed to assist student pharmacists attempting to recover from difficult academic situations (Pharmacy Turning Point is an adaptation of a successful University counseling program).
6.1.1. Pharmacy Turning Point is a program designed to assist student pharmacists who are attempting to recover from difficult academic situations. This program is coordinated by the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and the Director of Admissions and Student Affairs and will involve faculty, staff, and outside educational resources. Participants will be expected to fulfill all program requirements, such as supervisory office visits with the coordinating staff (or faculty mentor), participation in tutoring labs and academic skills workshops, and monitoring of class attendance and academic performance.
6.2. Academic Probation: All student pharmacists must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.3, including incomplete grades. Student pharmacists with a cumulative GPA below 2.3 will be placed on academic probation for the following semester. Student pharmacists on academic probation must contact the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for a meeting before semester enrollment and complete a Probation Contract. The contract will be the result of an evaluation of the student pharmacist to determine the possible reasons for academic difficulty and development of a plan to address the areas contributing to academic difficulty. The Probation Contract is a useful way to address the academic problems the student pharmacist has encountered. Failure to sign a contract, by student pharmacist choice, results in academic dismissal from the College.
6.2.1. Student pharmacists on academic probation who earn a term GPA of 2.3 or higher but fail to raise their cumulative GPA to 2.3 or higher may be considered for a one-semester extension of their probation.
6.2.2. Student pharmacists on academic probation because of incomplete work can be removed from probation at any time the work is made up and a satisfactory GPA is recorded on the permanent record.
6.3. Failing Grades: A student pharmacist who receives a failing grade (F or U) in any professional course work must successfully complete an Academic Recovery Contract (i.e., remediation) developed by the course coordinator with input from the Department Chair / Vice Chair and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and approved by the Academic Progression Committee. The Academic Recovery Contract is similar to the Probation Contract; however, it deals more specifically with the coursework in which a failing grade was received. The Academic Recovery Contract discusses remediation and the need for demonstration of proficiency in the coursework in which a failing grade was received.
6.3.1. Student pharmacists will be required to remediate any class in which a failing grade (F or U) was received. The process for remediation will range from retaking the class the next academic year to “after-hours” coursework and assessment. After hours class work will consist of reviewing of video lectures, one-on-one discussion with faculty, and assessment(s). Remediation plans will be developed collaboratively by the course coordinator, department chairs/vice chairs, and the Academic Progression Committee (APC). In the context of this setting, “after-hours” is primarily considered to be the time periods between semesters. The decision for remediation will be made by the APC in consultation with the Dean.
6.3.2. Student pharmacists requiring course remediation must remediate any material for which they received a failing examination grade. Including additional remediation material is at the discretion of the faculty member coordinating remediation. If additional material that the student pharmacist previously earned a passing score is included, the score of the repeat attempt will be used to calculate the average remediation grade.
6.3.3. Student pharmacists must attend all meetings scheduled in the remediation contract unless the faculty member coordinating the remediation excuses them. An unexcused absence will result in termination of the remediation contract and remediation failure.
6.3.4. Successful remediation is defined as receiving a passing grade equal to or greater than 70% for the average of all assessments assigned under the remediation contract.
6.3.5. Remediated coursework performed in a successful manner will result in a grade change form being submitted to the University Registrar. The University’s academic record system will keep on file that the record contains a grade change due to remediation. The College also maintains records on all grades earned in the College and this record will be utilized for all honors, scholarships, and faculty recommendations from the College. The highest replacement grade that may be achieved secondary to remediation is a “70%” for a course grade.
6.3.6. The process for remediation of introductory and advanced pharmacy practice experiences will be coordinated through the Office of Experiential Education and the APC.
6.3.7. Remediation Contract and Content: the remediation course coordinator and any faculty members responsible for remediation content should agree on the plan set forth in the remediation contract presented to the student pharmacist and approved by the APC. This plan should include the time set aside for meetings between the faculty member and student pharmacist that may include informal assessment, answering questions regarding content, or other discussion. Remediation should be comparable in academic rigor to the original course. The remediation contract should include the following at a minimum:
6.3.7.1. Dates of assessments and expected completion date of the remediation;
6.3.7.2. Coordinator’s expectations for time allotted for individual study;
6.3.7.3. Course content to be remediated;
6.3.7.4. Expectations for the planned meetings between faculty and the student pharmacist;
6.3.7.5. General remediation principles outlined in Articles 6.3.1 through 6.3.5;
6.3.7.6. Statement of agreement of financial obligation for remediation fee;
6.3.7.7. Student pharmacist signature, course coordinator signature, and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs signature prior to the initiation of remediation.
6.3.8. A $1,500 fee will be paid by the student pharmacist for each remediation course. Remediation is both offered and designed to best prepare student pharmacists for professional practice and they are responsible for paying for this privilege. This fee will be paid to the College of Pharmacy for the support of academic and professional activities. Payment of this fee is required by the end of the semester following remediation or prior to graduation, whichever comes first. There will be no change in the grade on the transcript until this fee is paid in full.
6.3.9. If a student pharmacist does not successfully complete remediation as noted in 6.3.4, the student pharmacist will be academically suspended. Remediation a second time for the same course is not an option.
6.3.10. A failing grade during the P4 year will require re-taking the APPE experience. If possible, an attempt will be made to have the APPE during the student pharmacist’s open month if approved by the preceptor, the Associate Dean for Experiential Education, the Academic Progression Committee, and the Dean. If the failing grade takes place after the student’s open month has occurred, the student pharmacist’s graduation may be delayed pending successful remediation of the APPE experience.
6.3.11. If a student pharmacist receives two (2) or more failing grades (F or U) in any professional course work the student pharmacist will be dismissed from the program for scholastic deficiency. (Policy remains at 3 or more failing grades for Class of 2013, 2014, and 2015).
6.3.12. Any student pharmacist, who receives a grade of “I” (incomplete) at the end of an academic semester, must develop an academic plan with the course coordinators and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. The plan must be approved by the Academic Progression Committee. The plan must be in place at the start of the next semester with dates specified for the completion of the incomplete work which will be no later than the end of the next academic year. It is expected that incomplete coursework will be completed in a manner and timeframe as stated in the academic plan.
6.3.12.1. Failure to complete the academic plan will result in the course coordinator assigning a grade consistent with the academic work completed.
6.3.12.2. Any student pharmacist with a grade of “I” may not proceed to the APPE portion of the curriculum until the grade is recorded or the course is satisfactorily completed.
6.4. Academic Suspension: A student pharmacist on academic probation who fails to earn a GPA of at least 2.3 in any term that he or she is on academic probation will be academically suspended. Additionally, if the student pharmacist is on academic probation and professional/disciplinary probation at the same time, the student pharmacist will be suspended. Student pharmacists that are not successful in course remediation will be academically suspended. Readmission to the College will be available the next professional year pending approval by the Academic Progression Committee (APC) and the Dean. Both the suspension and readmission will be recorded on the student pharmacist’s permanent academic record. Student pharmacists who fail to earn a GPA of at least 3.0 during the fourth professional year will be academically suspended. The APC and the Dean in coordination with the Office of Experiential Education will approve readmission to the College.
6.4.1. A student pharmacist who returns from academic suspension will automatically be placed on academic probation. No academic coursework earned elsewhere during the suspension will be used either in the calculation of the student pharmacist’s academic status, nor transferred as credit toward a degree.
6.5. Academic Dismissal: If a student pharmacist is on probation as a result of having returned from an academic suspension, and fails to meet the 2.3 GPA retention standards for any semester (or 3.0 GPA in the fourth professional year), then he or she will be academically dismissed from the program. No student pharmacist shall be academically dismissed unless he or she has first been academically suspended, except in the case of the student pharmacist receiving two failing grades.
6.6. Student Pharmacist Involvement in College Activities during Academic Jeopardy: Student pharmacists that have been placed on academic warning, probation, suspension, or have received failing grades are restricted from involvement in student and/or professional organizations. This includes involvement in student pharmacist organizations, mission trips, health service projects, and attendance at professional meetings. Student pharmacists may still serve as members in professional organizations. Activities developed by professional organizations or extracurricular activities (e.g., intramurals) should be avoided due to time requirements and the subsequent loss of time that could be used for academic studies. Should a student pharmacist desire to participate in an activity of a professional organization or an extracurricular activity of the University, they shall request written permission of the Director of Admissions and Student Affairs.
6.6.1. Student pharmacists who failed one course are not eligible for holding a leadership position or attending professional meetings or events that coincide with class time until they successfully remediate and subsequently have a semester without a failing grade. The remediation period includes the time from when the student fails a course until the remediation is successfully completed.
6.6.2. Student pharmacists on academic probation may not be appointed to any College committee or elected to any office in any College or pharmacy professional organization during the period of probation. Likewise, student pharmacists are not eligible to attend professional meetings or events that coincide with class time until they are removed from academic probation.
6.6.3. Student pharmacists reinstated after an academic suspension will be placed on academic probation and therefore subject to the stipulations outlined in Article 6.6.2.
6.6.4. Student pharmacists in academic jeopardy who are currently serving in an organizational or College leadership role must relinquish their responsibilities. The Academic Progression Committee will provide notification of academic jeopardy to the Office of Student Affairs and the organization’s faculty sponsor. If/when the student pharmacist’s eligibility is regained, he/she may at that time, in consultation with the organizational sponsor, the Office of Student Affairs, and the Academic Progression Committee, be considered for a leadership position. However, the student pharmacist may not be automatically reinstated in the position vacated.
6.6.5. Student pharmacists who have made financial commitments prior to becoming ineligible through the stipulations noted above or those who have two failing grades in ongoing coursework at the semester midpoint forfeit the right to attend professional meeting and events regardless of their monetary loss. Professional meetings or events that occur outside of class or remediation are exempt from this policy. However, no college financial support will be given for attendance.
7. Repeating Coursework
7.1. Student pharmacists are not allowed to drop any classes within the College’s professional curriculum.
7.2. All failing grades (F or U) are subject to the remediation processes outlined in Article 6.3.
7.3. A course in which the student pharmacist receives a grade of “A”, “B”, or “C” may not be repeated unless required by the Academic Progression Committee as a stipulation for continued enrollment.
8. Grade Appeal: A student pharmacist has the right to file an appeal if there is disagreement with the final grade that has been awarded in a course. Concerns may relate, but are not limited to: failure to abide by stated requirements described in the course syllabus, a disputed test question, and discrimination based on age, sex, religion, race, marital status, national origin, or disability. The procedure for bringing an academic appeal is as follows:
8.1. A formal appeal must be initiated within 30 calendar days following the date that grades are posted. The appeal should be completed within 60 calendar days following the initiation of the process.
8.2. The student pharmacist must initiate the process by presenting the appeal in writing to the faculty member who serves as course coordinator of the course. The faculty member will render a decision in writing.
8.3. If the appeal is denied by the faculty member, the student pharmacist may present it in writing to the appropriate department chairperson. The department chairperson will render a decision in writing.
8.4. If the appeal to the department chairperson is not resolved to the student pharmacist’s satisfaction, the student pharmacist may present the appeal in writing to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. This must be done within 10 days of the decision of the department chairperson. The appeal must specify the grounds, as well as supporting facts and arguments. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will consult with the Dean of the College of Pharmacy and will review supporting documents as well as any new information that may not have been available to the department chairperson or course coordinator at the time of his/her determination. Discovery of any new information brought forward by the student pharmacist will be provided to the department chairperson and the involved faculty member for review and feedback. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will render a final decision in writing after consultation with the Dean. This step ends the appeal process.
9. Withdrawal: The policy for student pharmacist voluntary withdrawal is located within the Student Pharmacist Handbook. A enrolled student pharmacist requesting withdrawal should notify the Director of Admissions and Student Affairs and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Withdrawal may be granted for medical or other extenuating circumstances and are subject to the financial obligations outlined in the aforementioned policy. The College will follow University guidelines for transcript and grade reporting.
10. Professionalism, Punctuality, and Class Attendance: It is the responsibility of student pharmacists and faculty to maintain an atmosphere in classrooms and laboratories that are conducive to teaching and learning. Behavior is expected to adhere to professional standards and to contribute in a positive way to the learning process. Behavior that is rude, disruptive, or that infringes on the rights of faculty, staff, or student pharmacists to effectively engage in the teaching/learning process will not be tolerated. A critical part of student pharmacist professionalism is showing respect to faculty and the opportunity to gain knowledge.
10.1. As part of demonstrating this professionalism, student pharmacists are required to attend class. Student pharmacists can miss no more class hours within an individual course than twice the number of course credit hours without penalty (i.e., four class hours of absences for a two semester credit hour course).
10.1.1. Course coordinators and instructors have the authority to routinely or randomly monitor and document class attendance by any verbal, written, or electronic method utilized at the beginning, during, or end of the scheduled class period.
10.1.2. There are no excused or unexcused absences; student pharmacists suffering illnesses or if there is another valid reason for the absence can utilize the aforementioned days (i.e., no more than twice the number of course credit hours) for these absences.
10.1.3. The College strongly discourages missing class haphazardly and it is deemed to be a breach of professionalism. If the student pharmacist reaches the limit of allowed absences and then, due to illness, needs to miss an additional day, a penalty will be enforced.
10.1.4. Makeup of missed assignments will be allowed if the student pharmacist is within the allowed number of absences. Some graded assignments are not conducive to makeup (i.e., group projects, presentations) and in those cases the course coordinator will exercise judgment whether course content makeup can be performed. In some cases, a modified version of the missed assignment will be assigned for makeup and this is at faculty discretion. Makeup of missed coursework should not disrupt the overall course schedule.
10.2. Extended absences (over one week) must be validated and cleared through the Office of Academic Affairs. The student pharmacist should notify the course coordinator prior to the absence, if known, or promptly thereafter to inform the coordinator of the circumstances. It is likely that the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will require documentation of illness from your health care provider if illness is the reason for the extended absence. The course coordinator will help the student pharmacist develop a plan to makeup any missed class work or assignments. In cases where the absence is more extensive, the Academic Progression Committee will work collaboratively with the course coordinators to schedule the makeup process.
10.3. The policy for managing attendance issues for individual student pharmacists is as follows:
10.3.1. Student pharmacists who miss class more than two times the number of credit hours for an individual course will be required to meet with the Director for Student Affairs and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. The final letter grade for the course will be reduced by one letter grade and no makeup of missed graded assignments will be allowed. If course remediation is required, the plan will be developed by the course coordinator and approved by the Academic Progression Committee.
10.3.2. Student pharmacists who miss class more than three times the number of credit hours for an individual course will be required to meet with the Director for Student Affairs and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. The final letter grade for the course reduced by two letter grades and no makeup of missed graded assignments will be allowed. If course remediation is required, the plan will be developed by the course coordinator and approved by the Academic Progression Committee.
10.3.3. Student pharmacists who miss class more than four times the number of credit hours for an individual course will be required to meet with the Director for Student Affairs and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. The final letter grade for the course reduced by three letter grades. This will require remediation of the course content per the College’s Academic Policies. The plans for remediation will be developed by the course coordinator and approved by the Academic Progression Committee.
10.4. When attendance for the entire class falls below 80% in classes for more than two times the number of credit hours for an individual course, the course coordinator has the authority to discontinue the electronic availability of lectures on the audio/video lecture capture system for the remaining portion of the semester.
10.5. Student pharmacists are expected to be in class, on time, and to be prepared for discussing lecture content/material. Tardiness is disruptive to fellow student pharmacists and to the instructor. Punctuality and preparedness are characteristics of a professional and will be expected of course participants.
10.6. Student pharmacists should not leave during the class period. Student pharmacists who must leave class during a lecture or presentation will not be permitted to re-enter the classroom until the next scheduled hour unless prior arrangements have been made with the course instructor.
10.7. Professional standards include appropriate dress and proper attention to personal hygiene. In general, student pharmacists should dress so that their most conservative classmate, instructor, employer, client or patient would not be offended. Extremes in outfits, hairstyles, and cosmetics should be avoided. Additional information regarding professional behavior, conduct, and attire is provided in the College’s document on Professional Behavior Guidelines.
11. Examinations: Examinations and other assessments may be given via an electronic or paper format at the discretion of the course coordinator. The guiding principles regarding examinations and assessments are reasonableness and fairness.
11.1. Student pharmacists must report for examinations as scheduled. Additionally, student pharmacists arriving for the exam after peer student pharmacists have completed the exam will not be allowed to take the exam. A score of “0” will be recorded for the student pharmacist and the student pharmacist should be referred to the Office of Academic Affairs. Extenuating circumstances leading to tardiness to an exam should be communicated to the Course Coordinator as soon as possible so that an alternate exam time and location can be scheduled. The Course Coordinator in consultation with the Office of Academic Affairs will make a final decision of the validity of the circumstances involved leading to exam tardiness.
11.2. It is the responsibility of the course coordinator to describe in the syllabus the course policy for making up exams that are canceled due to class disruption.
11.3. Tests and examinations are to be prepared by faculty and staff members only. Student pharmacists are not allowed to assist in the preparation of tests and examinations. This means student workers cannot help in any aspect of the preparation, copying, handling, or distribution of assessments. Privacy laws, courtesy, and good judgment dictate that student pharmacists should not have access to the grades of their peers.
11.4. All regular classes should have more than two graded tests or other assessment points during a semester. As a general rule, it is recommended that a class should have at least one test or other major graded assignment during the semester for each hour of credit offered for the class.
12. Capstone Assessments: The College will utilize a variety of assessments, including capstones, as a means of documenting competency and curricular readiness to advance to advanced pharmacy practice experiences or graduation.
12.1. The College will implement the Pharmacy Curriculum Outcomes Assessment (PCOA) as offered by the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP) as a mechanism to analyze and evaluate performance in the curriculum and identify individual student pharmacists’ strengths, weaknesses, and progress from year to year. The College will also be able to evaluate overall curricular strength as compared to national benchmarks comprised of other participating colleges/schools of pharmacy. Benchmark data will be able to be broken down into four major content areas and thirty-five subtopic areas. The PCOA will serve as a low stakes assessment and will be administered annually in the spring semester. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will schedule this assessment and publish the date in the class calendars.
12.2. Prior to the completion of the first academic year, student pharmacists will be required to successfully pass a calculation capstone assessment. This assessment will be considered high stakes as student pharmacists will not be allowed to graduate from the College until successful completion occurs. Student pharmacists who fail to meet the 70% passing score will be required to remediate a calculations module during breaks between semesters and will continue this remediation until a successful score is achieved.
13. Degree Requirements:
13.1. Completion of the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum with a passing grade in each course, a passing score in the calculations capstone, and with a 2.3 cumulative grade point average in a maximum of six academic years, unless enrolled in a dual degree program.
13.2. Forty-six months residence in an accredited school of pharmacy, the final 24 months of which must be completed at Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy.
13.3. Recommendation by the faculty of the College through the Academic Progression Committee.
13.4. Payment of all financial obligations to the College.
13.5. Compulsory attendance at graduation exercises, unless granted an exception by the Office of the Dean.
14. Graduation Exercises: A commencement ceremony is held annually at the end of the spring semester. The College’s student pharmacists will be eligible to participate in the commencement ceremony when all degree requirements as outlined in Article 13 are met.
14.1. The traditional cap and gown, with or without an academic hood, is considered formal academic attire for ceremonial events, and the addition of any ornamentation is quite limited by customary etiquette. At commencement, the College will provide cords and ribbons for graduates to wear acknowledging membership in nationally recognized academic honor societies.
14.2. A purple and white cord shows membership in Rho Chi.
14.3. A green cord signifies membership in Alpha Chi.
14.4. Traditional hoods of academic regalia are bestowed upon the graduates at commencement. The hood is lined with the Lipscomb University colors of purple and gold and is trimmed in olive green, denoting pharmacy.
14.5. Candidates for Graduation of the College should also attend a private recognition ceremony held in conjunction with the graduation ceremonies for Lipscomb University. All awards for graduates will be awarded at this ceremony.
15. Dean’s List and Honor Roll: To qualify for the Dean’s List, a student pharmacist must achieve a GPA of 4.0 for the semester. To qualify for the Honor Roll, a student pharmacist must achieve a 3.5 or higher GPA for the semester.
16. Transfer Credits from other Colleges/Schools of Pharmacy: Student pharmacists requesting a transfer to Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy from another Doctor of Pharmacy program must follow College guidelines.
16.1. Each case will be individually assessed on its merit and potential transfer students are to be informed that it is likely that an additional semester or more is likely to fulfill all required coursework.
16.2. Student pharmacists must have an official transcript of their work from each school they have attended mailed to the College of Pharmacy’s Director of Admission and Recruitment office.
16.3. A recommendation to accept courses will be made by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs after consultation with the University Registrar, Department Chairs, and the Director of Admissions and Student Affairs. Final decision to accept or deny will reside with the Dean. Each course will be reviewed by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs to establish whether or not the course work fulfills existing requirements within the College’s curriculum. If components of a particular course that are deemed critical elements by the Department Chairs were not covered by the previous academic institution in their respective curriculum (for a similarly described course), then the transfer student pharmacist will be asked to repeat that particular course upon admission to the College. The Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will provide the transfer student pharmacist a full listing of his/her curricular requirements prior to enrollment thereby providing opportunity to accept the conditions for transfer.
16.4. Transfer candidates will be evaluated for transfer eligibility based on previous academic performance, professional behavior, on-campus interview, and, when applicable, recommendations from faculty from the previous college/school of pharmacy.
16.5. A grade of “C” or better must have been earned for each course for transfer.
16.6. At least fifty-percent of the credit hours required for the Doctor of Pharmacy degree must be earned in coursework at Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy; therefore, only transfer candidates in the earliest semesters of their respective pharmacy programs are eligible for transfer.
16.7. Credit must have been received from an Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) approved college/school of pharmacy before it will be awarded. Additionally, the prospective transfer student pharmacist must complete an onsite interview process arranged by the Director of Admissions and Student Affairs.
16.8. Transfer student pharmacists may also be asked to complete an assessment consistent with the level of coursework the student pharmacist should have completed prior to transfer. An assessment will be made on the score received to ascertain if the transfer should move forward and at what academic level within the College.
16.9. Additionally, all applicants, including transfers, to Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy must possess a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5 on a 4.0 scale on all previous college work. All previous academic work will be evaluated.
17. College-Wide Assessment: Assessment is an integral part of the College’s self-study and accreditation process. The College focuses its assessment program on both curricular and programmatic outcomes. The Education Assessment Committee (EAC) oversees all assessment activities within the College.
17.1. Curricular Assessment: As a part of the ongoing assessment, evaluation, and review of the College’s curriculum, student pharmacist and faculty information are used for evaluation and feedback to improve the program and to document student pharmacist and faculty progress. The EAC will use course evaluations, faculty evaluations, student progress assessment and feedback, faculty progress, surveys, videotaped encounters, and group work in this ongoing process. For student pharmacist assessment, data are primarily reported in the aggregate, and individual identification will be protected. There will be some instances when videotape review will be used to teach interviewing skills and group dynamics. All persons being videotaped will give their consent prior to any use of the videotaped material. When data are used for documenting and publishing about the curriculum and student pharmacist outcomes, appropriate institutional review will occur and aggregate data used. If the use of identifying information is needed, appropriate student pharmacist consent will be obtained.
17.2. Programmatic Outcomes: The College annually updates a Scorecard that tracks the College’s performance in admissions, graduation rates, licensure pass rates, retention, faculty scholarship, alumni employment, and satisfaction of faculty and staff.
18. CLEP/AP Credit Acceptance: Advanced placement (AP) and CLEP credit (credit by examination) may be used to satisfy prerequisite coursework provided that the credit is accepted by the applicant’s institution and is posted on the applicant’s official academic transcript. Acceptance of credit is at the discretion of Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy based upon course equivalency standards.
19. Non-traditional Doctor of Pharmacy Program: There will be no program at Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy by which baccalaureate pharmacists may earn the Doctor of Pharmacy degree. At this time, the only professional degree offered by Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy will be the entry-level Doctor of Pharmacy degree.
20. Student Pharmacist Records: The College follows University guidelines and regulations regarding access to student pharmacist records and is consistent with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Ordinarily, access to records is restricted to authorized personnel, such as deans, the Office of Student Affairs, and all University approved staff per the University policy (such as Provost, Registrar). Faculty must have legitimate academic interest to view student pharmacist records. That principally occurs when faculty serve as a student pharmacist’s academic mentor. Faculty also have implied consent to view a student pharmacist’s record if asked for a letter of recommendation, or if a student pharmacist asks a faculty member to act as an mentor on a research project. Student pharmacists wishing to deny faculty access to their records under either of the previously cited cases must notify the Office of Student Affairs of their wishes each time a request for faculty action is initiated. Faculty will have access to student pharmacist records in other circumstances only with permission from the College’s Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or the Director of Admissions and Student Affairs.
21. Textbooks: Student pharmacists will be provided a listing of all required and recommended textbooks well in advance of the next academic semester. The student pharmacists will be provided ISBN-13 identification numbers and are responsible for acquiring the textbook prior to the start of the next semester’s courses. Student pharmacists bear all responsibility regarding their purchases. The College will assure that the University Bookstore stock a sufficient number of textbooks to accommodate all student pharmacists desiring to purchase their books on campus. Student pharmacists in the Fall semester of the first professional year will have all required textbooks bundled and available for pickup prior to the start of the semester. The College may also utilize online textbooks (e-texts) as a part of course requirements. In such cases where an online textbook is used, the faculty must assure that sufficient access to the text can be achieved by any computer that meets the minimal requirements for personal notebook (laptop) as described by the College.
22. Computers and Computer Skills: Computer literacy is an entry requirement for Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy. Student pharmacists will not be able to complete the coursework in the Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) curriculum without a solid foundation in basic computer skills, which the College defines as competence in using: • Microsoft Word (or equivalent word processor) • Microsoft Excel (or equivalent spreadsheet program) • Microsoft PowerPoint • Adobe Reader • E-Mail • Internet Web Browsers (i.e., Internet Explorer 6.0 or higher, Mozilla) Student pharmacists will be required to document that they possess these minimal skills during orientation of the first professional year. Student pharmacists requesting supplemental training will be accommodated. All student pharmacists will be required to have a personal notebook (laptop) computer with wireless networking capability and software that meets a minimum set of specifications. Computer specifications are located on the College’s website under the “Computer Requirements” tab.
23. Grievance Procedure: Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education Accreditation Standards: Any student pharmacist may bring a grievance or complaint in reference to the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) accreditation standards. Details regarding this process are outlined in the Student Pharmacy Handbook.

 

Pharmacy Prerequisites

Pharmacy prerequisites include a minimum 64 undergraduate hours including:

Course Minimum Semester
Credit Hours
 
General chemistry with laboratories 8  
Organic chemistry with laboratories 8  
Biology with laboratories  8  
Microbiology with laboratories 4  
Calculus 3  
Statistics 3  
English Composition I and II 6  
Speech communication 3  
Micro or macro economics 3  
Electives-humanities and social science 12   
Additional electives 6  
TOTAL hours (minimum) 64   

 

 

 

 

Doctor of Pharmacy Curriculum (155 hours)

The following courses of study are designed to prepare a student for the Doctor of Pharmacy degree at Lipscomb University College of Pharmacy.

PHAD - Health Sciences Administration

PHAE - Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

PHIE -  Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences

PHPR - Pharmacy Practice

PHSC - Pharmaceutical Sciences

Professional Year 1

Fall - Semester 1

PHAD 1000   Dean’s Hour (0)

PHAD 1111     Applied Christian Values I (1) (S/U)

PHIE 1511      Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences I (1)

PHPR 1002    Foundations in Pharmacy Practice (2)

PHPR 1622    Pharmacy Calculations (2)

PHSC 1113    Physiological Basis of Therapeutics I (3)

PHSC 1213    Biomolecular Chemistry (3)

PHSC 1313    Microbiology and Immunology (3)

PHSC 1413    Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry (3)

PHSC 1512    Integrated Biomedical Sciences Lab I (2)

Semester Credit Hours: 20

Professional Year 1

Spring - Semester 2

PHAD 1303    Pharmacy Leadership and Management (3)

PHAD 1202    Biomedical Literature Analysis and Drug Information (2)

PHIE 1521      Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences II (1)

PHPR 1613     Pharmacy Compounding and Dispensing (3)

PHSC 1123     Physiological Basis of Therapeutics II (3)

PHSC 1423     Biopharmaceutics (3)

PHSC 1522     Integrated Biomedical Sciences Lab II (2)

PHSC 1613     Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics I (3)

Semester Credit Hours: 20

Professional Year 2

Fall - Semester 3

PHAD 2111   Applied Christian Values II (1) (S/U)

PHAD 2432   Communication Skills (2)

PHAD 2423   Concepts in Pharmacy Practice Administration (3)

PHIE 2511     Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences III (1)

PHPR 2312   Natural Medicine (2)

PHPR 2422   Introduction to Health Informatics (2)

PHPR 2903   Clinical Concepts of Disease I (3)

PHSC 2433   Advanced Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics (3)

PHSC 2623   Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics II (3)

Semester Credit Hours: 20

Professional Year 2

Spring - Semester 4

PHAD 2222   Principles of Health Care Delivery (2)

PHIE 2521     Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences IV (1)

PHPR 2703   Non-prescription Medications and Devices (3)

PHPR 2813   Pharmacotherapy I (3)

PHPR 2823   Pharmacotherapy II (3)

PHPR 2913   Clinical Concepts of Disease II (3)

PHSC 2633   Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics III (3)

Semester Credit Hours: 18

Professional Year 3

Fall - Semester 5

PHAD 3111    Applied Christian Values III (1) (S/U)

PHAD 3232    Pharmacoeconomics & Health Outcomes (2)

PHIE 3511     Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences V (1)

PHPR 3121   Practice Seminar I (1)

PHPR 3502   Medication Therapy Management (2)

PHPR 3512   Applied Pharmacotherapy I (2)

PHPR 3813   Pharmacotherapy III (3)

PHPR 3823   Pharmacotherapy IV (3)

PHAD 3nnV , or PHPR 3nnV , or PHSC 3nnV  Elective I (2)

PHAD 3nnV , or PHPR 3nnV  , or PHSC 3nnV   Elective II (2)

Semester Credit Hours: 19

Professional Year 3

Spring - Semester 6

PHAD 3443    Pharmacy Law and Ethics (3)

PHIE 3522      Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences VI (2)

PHPR 3131    Practice Seminar II (1)

PHPR 3522    Applied Pharmacotherapy II (2)

PHPR 3833    Pharmacotherapy V (3)

PHPR 3843    Pharmacotherapy VI (3)

PHAD 3nnV  , or PHPR 3nnV  , or PHSC 3nnV   Elective III (2)

PHAD 3nnV  , or PHPR 3nnV  , or PHSC 3nnV   Elective IV (2)

Semester Credit Hours: 18

Professional Year 4

Summer / Fall - Semester 7

PHAE 4nn4   Advanced Practice Experience I (4)

PHAE 4nn4   Advanced Practice Experience II (4)

PHAE 4nn4  Advanced Practice Experience III (4)

PHAE 4nn4   Advanced Practice Experience IV (4)

PHAE 4nn4  Advanced Practice Experience V (4)

PHAE 4nn4   Advanced Practice Experience VI (4)

Semester Credit Hours: 24

Professional Year 4

Spring - Semester 8

PHAE 4nn4   Advanced Practice Experience VII (4)

PHAE 4nn4   Advanced Practice Experience VIII (4)

PHAE 4nn4   Advanced Practice Experience IX (4)

PHAE 4nn4   Advanced Practice Experience X (4) 

PHPR 4900   Pharmacy Practice Review (0)

Semester Credit Hours: 16

Dual Degree: Doctor of Pharmacy and Master of Management (MM)

Because of the future demands of the health care industry, pharmacy professionals are needed to lead and manage people and situations. The Doctor of Pharmacy /Master of Management dual degree provides student pharmacists with practical business skills in addition to their clinical knowledge. The program will prepare student pharmacists for highly competitive management position in pharmacy, health care or business, as well as help improve skills in problem-solving, leadership, and communication.

The program will be offered over two summer semesters. Interested students will earn both the Doctor of Pharmacy and the Master of Management degrees at the completion of required course work. The two programs will run concurrently.

Note: College of Pharmacy students participating in a dual degree program must adhere to the admissions and academic policies of each graduate program that are consistent with policies for dual degree programs. For additional information see the Dual Degree Programs sections in this catalog.

Financial Information (MM)

Tuition and Fees for 2017-18*

Tuition  
Tuition per credit hour $1,200
Tuition to audit 50% of tuition
   
Fees  
Application fee $50
Application for Graduation $195
Returned payment fee $30
TouchNet payment plan enrollment fee (per semester) $60
Withdrawal fee $195

*Effective May 1, 2017

 

Courses from the College of Pharmacy Curriculum (155 hours):

See courses listed under the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum.

Fifteen hours of the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum are required courses, which apply toward the dual degree. Since these are required courses the costs are covered by the College of Pharmacy tuition.

Courses from the Master of Management (15 hours):

See the Master of Management (MM) course descriptions under the College of Business. College of Business tuition rates apply.

Master of Management Courses:

MMGT 5003   Becoming a Professional (3)

MMGT 5103   Managing Yourself and Others I (3)

MMGT 5113   Managing Yourself and Others II (3)

MMGT 5203   Managing for Results I (3)

MMGT 5213   Managing for Results II (3)

 

Dual Degree: Doctor of Pharmacy and Master of Science in Health Care Informatics (MHCI)

Health Care Informatics (HCI) is a growing and emerging discipline which evaluates the application of biomedical informatics methods and techniques utilized in the provision of health care services. Also included is the vital role HCI plays in enhancing the quality of care, reducing health care costs and addressing health issues.

Professionals who understand the relationship between people, health, information technology the health care system are in great demand.

For this reason, Lipscomb University is offering two innovative and exciting programs in HCI. We offer the dual degree program Doctor of Pharmacy and Master of Science in Health Care Informatics. Also offered is the Doctor of Pharmacy and Certificate in Health Care Informatics.

Career options are unlimited for pharmacists with this expertise and include such areas as health system pharmacy, hospital corporations, academia, community, managed care, regulatory and government, vendor, legal, consulting, entrepreneurial, clinical research, and the pharmaceutical industry.

Students will earn both the Doctor of Pharmacy and the Master of Science in Health Care Informatics degrees at the completion of required course work. The two programs will run concurrently, with students completing coursework in the HCI program during summers of the P1-P3 years and during the summer and fall of the P4 year.

Application and admission process: Student pharmacists apply for the dual program during the spring semester before coursework begins in the following summer semester.  The application process includes submission of an updated resume or CV, a 1-2 page goals statement describing goals for the dual program, and completion of an interview with the program director and faculty members.

Note: College of Pharmacy students participating in a dual degree program must adhere to the admissions and academic policies of each graduate program that are consistent with policies for dual degree programs. For additional information see the Dual Degree Programs sections in this catalog.

Financial Information (HCI)

Tuition and Fees for 2017-18*

Tuition  
Tuition per credit hour $1,030
Tuition to audit 50% of tuition
   
Fees  
Application fee $50
Application for Graduation $195
Returned payment fee $30
TouchNet payment plan enrollment fee (per semester) $60
Withdrawal fee $195

*Effective May 1, 2017

 

Courses from the College of Pharmacy Curriculum (155 hours):

See courses listed under the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum.

Seven hours of the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum are required courses, which apply toward the dual degree. Since these are required courses the costs are covered by the College of Pharmacy tuition.

These required courses are:

PHPR 2422    Health Informatics

PHPR 3nnV    Consumer Health Informatics

HCI 5033    Project Management (PHPR 3nnV )

 

Courses from the Master of Science in Health Care Informatics (27 hours).  

Select nine courses from the list below (must include HCI 5903 Capstone Project):

HCI 5003         Decision Support Systems (3)
HCI 5013         Information Systems Management (3)
HCI 5123         Ethical and Legal Issues in Health Care Informatics (3)
HCI 5133         Health Care IT Vendor Management (3)
HCI 5203         Leadership and Organizational Behavior (3)
HCI 5213         Operations in Health Care Organizations (3)
HCI 5253         Contemporary Issues in Health Care (3)
HCI 5903         Capstone Project (3)
ISEC 5113       Introduction to Information Security (3)
MITM 5023      Data and Knowledge Management (3)
MITM 5213      Predictive Analytics and Data Mining (3)

 

NOTE: MITM 5213 has prerequisites, which include a course in Statistics and also MITM 5023 - Data and Knowledge Management.

Degree - Certificate: Doctor of Pharmacy and Certificate in Health Care Informatics

Interested students will earn both the Doctor of Pharmacy and the Certificate in Health Care Informatics at the completion of required course work. The two programs will run concurrently.

Courses from the College of Pharmacy curriculum (155 hours):

See courses listed under the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum.

Courses from the Master of Science in Health Care Informatics (12 hours):

Select four courses from the list below:  

HCI 5003         Decision Support Systems (3)
HCI 5013         Information Systems Management (3)
HCI 5123         Ethical and Legal Issues in Health Care Informatics (3)
HCI 5133         Health Care IT Vendor Management (3)
HCI 5203         Leadership and Organizational Behavior (3)
HCI 5213         Operations in Health Care Organizations (3)
HCI 5253         Contemporary Issues in Health Care (3)
ISEC 5113       Introduction to Information Security (3)
MITM 5023      Data and Knowledge Management (3)
MITM 5213      Predictive Analytics and Data Mining (3)

 

 

 

Program of Study Requirements

    Doctor of PharmacyDoctor of Pharmacy/Master of Science in Health Care Informatics

    Return to {$returnto_text} Return to: All Graduate Programs